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“Grotta del Cane”

Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;}The present anonymous painting depicts the famous Grotta del Cane [it. Cave of Dogs]. It is located near Naples, by Lake Agname. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the cave was one of the tourist attractions of the region, visited by aristocrats and intellectuals travelling across Italy as part of so-called Grand Tour: a journey through the Old Continent, which was a traditional stage in the education of European elites.

“A Bust of Lenin” by Xawery Dunikowski

Xawery Dunikowski (1875–1964) is one of the greatest Polish sculptors of the 20th century. The present bust of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin comes from the post-war period in the artist’s work. After the WWII, the ideas of social realism carried Dunikowski away. However, ideological activities did not translate into the form of his works: he remained faithful to the expressive, simplified form he developed in the interwar period.

“Wild boar” – a plaster cast of an antique sculpture

The plaster statue of a wild boar in the collection of the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków is a copy of an ancient sculpture stored in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. This marble representation of a wild boar comes from Roman times and is a copy of the lost Hellenistic original probably made in Lysippos’circles. The Roman statue of a wild boar was presented to the Duke of Tuscany, Cosimo I de Medici (1519–1574) by Pope Pius IV (1499–1565). At the request of Cosimo de Medici, the sculptor Pietro Tacca (1577–1640) made a bronze copy, which contributed to the popularization of the statue. Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;}

A workbench for mural painting designed by Wacław Taranczewski

A wooden table on metal wheels, doubling as a palette for mural painting, designed by Wacław Taranczewski. In the years1948–1970, the artist held the post of a professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków, managing the faculty of decorative painting. Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;}

A sketch of a not created painting “Długosz and St. Kazimierz” by Jan Matejko

The presented pencil drawing by Jan Matejko is a sketch for the painting entitled Długosz and St. Kazimierz which was eventually left unpainted. On his paintings, Matejko often presented historical topics from the reign of the Jagiellonians. One can mention, among others, such paintings as: Stańczyk during a ball at the court of Queen Bona, in the face of the loss of Smolensk (1862), Union of Lublin (1869), The Hanging of the Sigismund bell (1874), or Prussian Homage (1880–1882).

A sketch for the painting “Stefan Batory at Pskov” by Jan Matejko

The drawing is a preparatory study for the oil painting by Jan Matejko Stefan Batory at Pskov, which can be found in the collection of the Royal Castle in Warsaw. The painting was completed in 1872, and the artist began sketching it three years earlier. This work loosely refers to the events of the three war campaigns against Moscow conducted over the years 1577–1581 by King Stefan Batory.

Small bottle in the form of a bull

The small porcelain perfume bottle is in the shape of a figurine showing an anthropomorphized bull or cow. The figure has a human body and an erect posture. The head has the shape of a cow’s or bull’s head, proportional to the whole body. The figure is dressed in a wide green coat ending behind the knees, white trousers and black shoes.

Ring for perfume

The massive ring is made of metal, painted in gold and decorated with a hemispherical ornament and a thin, striped ring around the socket. There is pearl inside the socket.

Bottle in the shape of a castle

Made of colourless glass, the perfume bottle has the surprising shape of a castle. The stopper, made of gilded glass, constitutes its roof. The style of the castle’s architectural form is the so-called French costume – a neo-Renaissance style with elements of Baroque, characteristic of the 2nd half of the 19th century.

Jan Hoeft, untitled (+ 48 XX XXX XXXXX)

Jan Hoeft initiated an artistic intervention taking place on the border of visibility: in the middle of a vast lawn in Kraków’s Błonia Park, he placed a ten-metre-long sculpture, made of stainless steel, deliberately resembling a scaled-up barrier (easily restored if necessary). Over its frame, a white and red scarf was slung, reminiscent of the colours sported by the fans of the nearby football clubs, Cracovia and Wisła. In place of the club’s name, a phone number was embroidered, the use of which resulted in drawing the caller into a remote performance, following the scenario prepared by the artist.

Honza Zamojski, “Modernism”

Honza Zamojski’s video, entitled Modernism, is an attempt to critically look at the phenomenon of modernism in architecture. The artist reduces the ideas underlying this trend to a simple pattern of repetitive action seen on the screen. As a result of a looped gesture of arranging round cookies, placing one on another, a kind of a tower is created, which, in a distant association, evokes materialized assumptions of modernist architecture, manifested in simple geometrical forms, abandoning decorativeness and ornamentation, reducing the body of the building to an abstract structure.

Lidia Krawczyk, Wojciech Kubiak, from the series “Genderqueer: M.”

The project Genderqueer was implemented by Lidia Krawczyk and Wojciech Kubiak in the period 2006–2008. The first comprehensive presentation of a series of paintings, photographs, films, and sculptures was the exhibition, Becoming, in Bunkier Sztuki Gallery (2008), which, at the same time, was the crowning touch for all the activities related to it. The themes of the exhibition focused on the topic of the constant need to declare one’s identity and sexuality. The subject of interest to the artists was an attempt to show the ambiguity of the relations formed between what is feminine and masculine. People who expressed their willingness to share their experiences, related to expressing their own gender identity that deviates from socially expected conventions and the traditional division of gender roles, have become the protagonists of images and photography.

Hubert Gromny, Xavery Wolski, “Crystal Skulls Are Modern Fakes? Adventure Movie”

Historical conspiracy theories – the Muhlenberg legend, spectral time hypothesis, the Protocols of the Elders of Zion – have occupied the minds of a large group of scholars and lovers of the past for centuries, being also one of the most controversial and, at the same time, interesting elements of contemporary culture. For Hubert Gromny and Xavery Wolski, they became an inspiration to create the installation Crystal skulls are modern fakes? Adventure Movie. Starting from the eclectic nature of conspiracy theories, drawing randomly from historical science, pop culture, and futurology, the creators tested their typical determinants and created a new conspiracy narrative. It questions the official theories referring to the origins of the Slavic peoples. In this attempt to mediate conspiracy theories, the artists created the character of Janusz “Johnny” Bzibziak PhD – a Polish Indiana Jones – associated with the Archaeological Museum of Kraków. The protagonist is a specialist in the field of research on nomadic peoples and a proponent of a theory postulating links between the ancestors of Slavs, Cimmerians, and Scythians.

Jakub Woynarowski, “Outopos”

Outopos is an interactive diagram, that works only in the form of a website. Its hypertext structure is based on a series of graphics, text, and animation. In its design, the diagram is a conceptual grid, which creates a variable, visual essay, on the subject of utopia as the perfect non-existent place, “non-place” (outopos). The virtual space, where the work is located, is particularly suited to contemporary reflection on the topic of utopia, fitting into the framework of the construction of the new world.

Maciej Chorąży, “Flashback Smurfs”

Maciej Chorąży’s work, Flashback Smurfs, contains an attempt to mirror perceiving the world from a child’s perspective and light criticism of consumer culture, which gives mass production objects symbolic meaning – sometimes even magical – always according to the standard algorithm of promoted values (such as beauty, youth, attractiveness, usefulness, and effectiveness). In realizing both these artistic assumptions, the ordinary object acquired from everyday surroundings play a central role.

Michał Jelski, “D.G./D.Y.60s0-0-0.4s”

The photographic work of Michał Jelski, DG/D.Y.60s0-0-0.4s, is an unusual record of issues focusing on conflict. Its sphere of presentation – patches of colour – whose smooth transitions are disturbed by a distinctive streak, primarily refers to the manipulation of materials applied on the surface of the artistic medium used. The photogram technique used by the artist involves irradiation of photo paper without the use of special devices designed for this purpose, such as a camera. The image is created here is the result of obscuring the photosensitive material with semi-transparent or opaque objects (in such a case, we talk about the technique of luxography).

Monika Niwelińska, “Lighting”

Doświetlanie [Illuminating], by Monika Niwelińska, was inspired by the system of natural lighting of the first floor at the BWA Exhibition Pavilion in Kraków – today’s Bunkier Sztuki Gallery of Contemporary Art. The artist made an analysis of the specific history and topography of the place in the form of an installation, which was once lit up by sun rays coming through the skylights in the ceiling, and it underwent a transformation in the early years of the institution’s operation due to architectural interference. An intriguing architectural solution, which was planned in the 1960s by the Gallery’s architect, Krystyna Tołłoczko-Różyska, turned out to be utopian. The roof began to leak quickly.

Nicolas Grospierre, “The House Which Grows”

The project by Nicolas Grospierre, The house which grows, tackles the problem of the gap between aesthetics and the functionality of architecture. In his work, the artist is interested in forms of modernist architecture and in how the very possibility of establishing universal public housing led to the fall of this utopian project.

Rafani, untitled (“On Invisible”)

The performance On Invisible by the Czech collective Rafani, was staged simultaneously in one of the exhibition halls of the Bunkier Sztuki Gallery and in the urban space. In the gallery spaces, it was witnessed by people who intentionally arrived at the event; these witnesses, however, met only the lecturer, a poet from Kraków, and the slammer, Jan Paweł Kowalewicz (a.k.a. Roman Boryczko), connected using the telephone conference method with five performers.

Tomasz Dobiszewski, from the series “Anecdotes”

The area of Tomasz Dobiszewski’s exploration is time and space, constraints of perception, illusion and interaction issues. In his works, which testify to the processes of taming the media, he does not limit himself to purely conceptual cognitive strategies but enriches the discourse with non-intellectual elements: sensual impressions and intuitive cognition. He combines messages which are legible to various human senses, and, while experimenting with the physiology of seeing or hearing, on the one hand he aims at fuller, more complete transfer, while on the other, he deprives the viewer of the possibility to learn about the essence of his work.