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Łukasz Surowiec, “Zbigniew, 60” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Łukasz Surowiec, “Piotr, 46” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Łukasz Surowiec, “Erwin, 48” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Łukasz Surowiec, “Eugeniusz, 63” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Łukasz Surowiec, “Zofia, 50” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Andreas Kaufmann, from the series “40 Gestures”

The artistic creativity of Andreas M. Kaufmann has evolved around such concepts as space, time, and the public sphere. It is manifested through a variety of means (both analogue and digital) and forms; the artist is particularly fond of using projection. The increasingly strong mutual penetration of the artistic sphere and technology has led the artist to undertaking reflections on the civilizational context in which current art functions.

Andreas Kaufmann, from the series “40 Gestures”

The artistic creativity of Andreas M. Kaufmann has evolved around such concepts as space, time, and the public sphere. It is manifested through a variety of means (both analogue and digital) and forms; the artist is particularly fond of using projection. The increasingly strong mutual penetration of the artistic sphere and technology has led the artist to undertaking reflections on the civilizational context in which current art functions.

Karol Radziszewski, “Study for the Wounded Insurgent”

Karol Radziszewski’s work consists of six photographs and a drawing made on their basis. The cycle is considered a preparatory study for the mural, which was to be created in 2009 at the Mur Sztuki Gallery, located in the Museum of the Warsaw Uprising. However, the work did not come to fruition, because it was considered too erotic and detrimental to the feelings of the museum’s public.

Michał Jelski, “D.G./D.Y.60s0-0-0.4s”

The photographic work of Michał Jelski, DG/D.Y.60s0-0-0.4s, is an unusual record of issues focusing on conflict. Its sphere of presentation – patches of colour – whose smooth transitions are disturbed by a distinctive streak, primarily refers to the manipulation of materials applied on the surface of the artistic medium used. The photogram technique used by the artist involves irradiation of photo paper without the use of special devices designed for this purpose, such as a camera. The image is created here is the result of obscuring the photosensitive material with semi-transparent or opaque objects (in such a case, we talk about the technique of luxography).

Nicolas Grospierre, “The House Which Grows”

The project by Nicolas Grospierre, The house which grows, tackles the problem of the gap between aesthetics and the functionality of architecture. In his work, the artist is interested in forms of modernist architecture and in how the very possibility of establishing universal public housing led to the fall of this utopian project.

Tomasz Dobiszewski, from the series “Anecdotes”

The area of Tomasz Dobiszewski’s exploration is time and space, constraints of perception, illusion and interaction issues. In his works, which testify to the processes of taming the media, he does not limit himself to purely conceptual cognitive strategies but enriches the discourse with non-intellectual elements: sensual impressions and intuitive cognition. He combines messages which are legible to various human senses, and, while experimenting with the physiology of seeing or hearing, on the one hand he aims at fuller, more complete transfer, while on the other, he deprives the viewer of the possibility to learn about the essence of his work.

“Camera/Mr Daguerre’s invention” (“Wielopole, Wielopole”, 1980)

Kantor observed some analogy between photography and shooting, between a group posing for a photograph and a group of recruits lined up in a row. This field of association was used in one of the images from Wielopole, Wielopole, a performance that continued the themes/motifs from Umarła klasa [The Dead Class].

Exakta Varex VX Camera

The Exakta Varex VX camera, version 4.3.1, was produced between July 1953 and June 1955 in the Ihagee Kamerawerk plant in Dresden. It is a single-lens reflex camera with a roll-film. 39 thousand units were produced of this version of the model.

Folding camera from 19th/20th century

Undoubtedly, Włodzimierz Puchalski’s struggles with photography were initiated by his father, Władysław, and his older brother, Roman. This mahogany folding camera was the first one that Włodzimierz Puchalski used. He got it from his grandfather, Hieronim Sykora, and as a 13-year-old boy he discovered a passion for photography.

Folding TRIX 185 camera

The Trix 185 camera was manufactured at the beginning of the 20th century, during the period 1902–1920, by the German company ICA (Internationale Camera Aktiengesselschaft). It was Włodzimierz Puchalski’s second camera and comes from a period when arduous work with the film and photo camera brought the young artist his first successes.

Membership card of the Polish Air Navigation Services Association of Adam Wojtyga

The Polish Aviation Society was founded on 11 December 1916 in Warsaw, the day the society's statute was submitted to the Provisional Council of State in Warsaw. The first meeting (organizational) took place on 1 February 1917 in Warsaw. From 26 February to 15 May 1917, the society ran flight courses, which were completed by 73 students.

Photograph “Tadeusz Pankiewicz in the company of four people in the duty room”

Dr Roman Glassner is sitting in a dark leather armchair in the middle; on the left is Helena Krywaniuk sitting back on an armchair, leaning against Aurelia Danek who is standing behind her. Dr Leon Glück is sitting back on the seat on the right. Tadeusz Pankiewicz stands behind the armchair in the background.

Photograph “Church in Mistrzejowice” by Stanisław Gawliński

Nowa Huta was exceptionally fortunate as it was home to a multitude of excellent photographers. Some of them had been resident in the district almost from the first day of its creation. Others were attracted by ‘constructionalism’ or simply were given a flat here. Even more photographers followed, in order to fulfil the assignments of the editorial offices or to find interesting topics, plenty of which Nowa Huta had to offer.

Photograph “Federation of Fighting Youth demonstration” by Stanisław Gawliński

Under the state of martial law, Nowa Huta was the largest bastion of the independent, self-governing Labour Union “Solidarity”, that was operating underground at the time. Huge demonstrations took place here, often turning into dramatic clashes with the authorities. With the passing of time, however, the activity of the underground began to diminish, and it eventually restricted its actions to publishing underground newspapers and self-help. The situation didn't change before the late 1980s, when a new generation of activists came to the fore. Its core were the young workers and students most often belonging to such organizations as the Confederation of Independent Poland, Fighting Solidarity, the Freedom and Peace Movement, and the Federation of Fighting Youth.

Photograph “John Paul II in Mistrzejowice” by Stanisław Gawliński

Jokingly, we can say that John Paul II owes his career to Nowa Huta. The troubles connected with the construction of the new church in Nowa Huta, created by the communists, had compelled Bishop Eugeniusz Baziak to take action. He appointed Karol Wojtyła, despite his young age, as his deputy.