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Wooden cassette with triptych by Józef Mehoffer

This consists of a wooden cassette, iron-shod with brass, with a two-winged hinged lid, a brass shield at the front, with “WIELICZKA” and a crown at the top. It contains a document granting honorary citizenship of the city of Wieliczka to Doctor Kazimierz Junosza-Gałecki.

Woman’s fan

The fan, originally designed as a cooling device, was elevated in modern times to a symbol of dignity. Over time, it became a very fashionable element of female attire. On the other hand, fan gestures became a conventional code used by men and women to communicate and flirt at the court.

Wojciech Gilewicz, “Revitalisations”

The project, Revitalisations, was implemented Wojciech Gilewicz in Sanok in 2007. The long-term marginalization of the city and its exclusion from comprehensive modernization projects prompted the artist to undertake his own, non-standard intervention, using the illusionistic potential of painting. The intention of the action was to repair the visual deficiencies of the urban fabric, to supplement its defects with the help of images, and by doing so, lead at least its temporary and provisional revitalization. During the artist’s several-week work in the public space of Sanok, pictorial mock-ups of reality covered the progressing degradation and neglect of buildings and streets. They replaced missing tiles of wall claddings, hid glaring dirt and lichen on elevations, filled plaster gaps, fitting perfectly into their shape.

Wilhelm Sasnal, untitled

Wilhelm Sasnal’s painting depicts, in a one-to-one scale, a 43-cm metal object, which comes from the hull of the continental aircraft which caused the crash of the Air France Concorde in 2000. Presented for the first time at the exhibition, Scene 2000, at the Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art in Warsaw, the picture is part of a series of canvases of the artist, connected with the subject of disasters and accidents. A few of them refer directly to the events related to the Concorde: apart from the two paintings belonging to the collection of the Bunkier Sztuki Gallery, the canvas is also divided into nine sections presenting the individual stages of the plane’s explosion.

Wilhelm Sasnal, untitled

The picture of Wilhelm Sasnal presents a view of the burning Concorde aircraft. The artist recreated the frame from an amateur film made from a car window, which was the only video recording of the disaster at Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris in 2000. Presented for the first time at the exhibition, Scene 2000, at the Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art in Warsaw, the picture is part of a series of canvases by this artist connected with the subject of disasters and accidents. Despite the fact that Sasnal created a few pictures concerning the subject of the Concorde catastrophe (shown in the Bunkier Sztuki Gallery at the exhibition POPelita), each of them should be perceived as a separate work, and not a specific work cycle. Sasnal’s deep fascination with recordings showing the course of the catastrophe may indicate the artist’s desire to reach the “truth”, to spot what was hidden under the layer of words, descriptions, and interpretations. This pursuit is driven by the awareness of the impossibility of achieving the goal.

Wedding chest

The chest was part of the dowry of a bride. The girl held in it her dowry – festive shirts, petticoats, skirts, aprons, scarves, true coral beads, homemade linen, and sometimes embroidered tablecloths. When it was “moved” to her husband's house, the lid of the chest was opened so that the neighbours could see the gathered dowry.

Vessel for potpourri – mixtures of dried flowers

The porcelain vase in the form of an urn, with openings in the lid, was intended for storing potpourris, i.e. scented mixtures made from dried herbs and flowers. The body of the vessel has a circular cross-section, is elongated, narrows at the base and turns into a round base on a square stand.

Vase for compositions made from dried flowers

This porcelain vase takes the form of a cup-shaped urn with holes in the lid. The dish is designed for making compositions from dried flowers. Its large, hemispherical body rests on a multi-stage stand with a circular cross-section, based on a square with bevelled corners.

Two creative sketches of the Manggha building by Arata Isozaki

According to legend, when Andrzej Wajda received a prize from the Inamori Foundation and promised that he would spend this prize on a new house of the Far East art collection, Arata Isozaki, the architect, declared that he would prepare the design of the future centre and donate it as a gift. And so it happened.

Two apothecary vessels

Vessels in the form of a monstrance for storing medicinal oils come from the convent pharmacy of Brothers Hospitallers of St. John of God in Cieszyn. The pharmacy began its functioning in the 1690s. At the time, the monastery in Cieszyn was founded, together with a hospital and a pharmacy run by monks. The vessels are decorated with white Rococo cartouches with gold borders. Inside the cartouches there are apothecary inscriptions in two-coloured majuscule: Ol. Cinnamomi — cinnamon oil — on one of the jars, and Ol. Macis — nutmeg oil — on the other.

Triptych “Family of Mary” from parochial church in Racławice Olkuskie

In the middle part of the triptych, the so-called “family of Maria” has been introduced, a multi-person image, based on the legend of the triple marriage of St. Anna (the Baby Jesus is standing on her knees) and the Blessed Virgin Mary are sitting on the bench in the centre of the painting. Behind the bench and St. Anna...

Tomasz Ciecierski, “Painter’s Palette”

A witty and ironic treatment of the colour-cum-symbol means available to painting. The artist plays with the shapes of splashes of colour, approaching colour in a free-flowing style. Sometimes, such splashes mean no more than the colour itself; at other times, they stand for an art trend or an object. Through such a naive colour game, one discovers the rich and diverse idiom of painting.

Tomasz Baran, untitled

The works made by Tomasz Baran seem to challenge the famous phrase emancipating the picture as an independent formal unit – they are a challenge to the flatness of the image and the order of colours that Denis recognized as one of the key properties. In his work, Baran analyses the issues of surface and colour, which are some of the basic elements building the form of the painting. By contradicting the traditional flatness of pictures, he brings painting closer to three-dimensional objects, he bends the loom, modifies the way it is attached to the canvas, trims painting edges in an irregular way, and creates spatial organisms by using them. In the work held in the Bunkier Sztuki collection, a sub-frame was created in a non-standard manner, which – apart from the place where canvas is stretched on a rectangular frame – was attached to two additional diagonally extending slats and to a cardboard layer covering the reverse of the painting, the elements inaccessible to the viewer’s eye. The outcome of this process is an uneven, spatial structure, consisting of convex and concave spots, usually absent from a smooth canvas plane.

Tiled stove, so-called amorial with coats of arms

The stove was manufactured in the maiolica factory in Nieborów, which was established in 1881 by Prince Michał Radziwiłł. It comes from the destroyed mansion in Krzyszkowice near Myślenice and it was renovated in 1977.

Tiled stove from manor house in Droginia

The tiled stove was moved to the Museum of the Vistula Ethnographic Park in Wygiełzów and the Lipowiec Castle as an element of the former furnishings of the manor house in Droginia. During the reconstruction it was located in the room constituting the museum exhibition where it performs a decorative function in the master’s room, although it used to be a source of heat in the Droginia manor where the Bzowski family lived for generations.

Tile with the Nałęcz coat of arms of Bishop Piotr Gembicki

In 1845, in A Souvenir from Kraków, Józef Mączyński mentioned the existence of two “ancient furnaces” inside the episcopal palace in Kraków. Furnaces built of tiles, decorated with the coat of arms of the bishops — Marcin Szyszkowski (Ostoja) and Piotr Gembicki (Nałęcz) — were already in poor condition in the middle of the 18th century, which had been noted in the inspection of the palace. However, thanks to the large, colourful tiles, those furnaces were certainly very decorative. Unfortunately, in 1850, the furnaces shared the fate of the episcopal palace, which burned down during the great fire of Kraków, and only single tiles and their fragments have survived to this day.

The “Christ on the Cross” icon

Helena Dąbczańska is a famous Lviv collector of incunabula, engravings, books, drawings, fabrics and furniture; the owner of a private museum organized in her own villa and the hostess on artistic Sunday mornings for representatives of the Lviv elite at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Teapot with lid

This early form of the teapot, the design of which is ascribed to Johann Jakob Irminger, was amended by a painted decoration outside the factory more than twenty years after the vessel had been finished. The linear, graphical method of painting was ascribed to Christian Daniel Buschow, who operated in Bayreuth.

Tabernacle (Kiwot)

The object comes from an Orthodox church in Jastrzębik, a village located to the south-west of Krynica. It is one of the two Orthodox tabernacles owned by the Museum in Nowy Sącz. These are extremely rare and valuable exhibits due to the time of their creation and rich painting decoration.

Red-figure pelike

The clay red-figure vessel comes from Kerch — a Greek colony situated on the Black Sea. It was made in the so-called Kerch style and is dated back to the 4th century BC. The edge of the vessel is trimmed with an ornament of an egg-and-dart encircling the figural scene. On the one side there is Arimaspian fighting with a gryphon. The warrior is dressed in a tunic and trousers — anaxyrides.