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Sculpture “Piper playing at the shrine” of Stanisław Wójcik

Intimate conversation One of the major institutions in Zakopane was the School of Wood Industry. It was founded upon the initiative of the Tatra Society in 1876 as a wood carving school “to support the poor highland population and local industry”, over time it became an important point on the cultural map of Zakopane because it educated many artists who made great contributions to its art.

Crystal radio receiver

“The whole country in the range of a detector” — it was a slogan of British radio operators from 1923. Six years later it was implemented by the Polish radio (Polskie Radio SA). Why a detector receiver? Why not a lamp receiver which gives better reception? There were several reasons, two of which were decisive: a much lower price and an independent source of power, which had to be important in a country like Poland where electricity was scarce in the 3rd decade of the 20th century.

Radio Elektrit Majestic (serial number 7578)

The Majestic radio receiver is an example of the production of one of the largest pre-war Polish radio companies — Towarzystwo Radiotechniczne Elektrit. This model was awarded the gold medal at the Radio Exhibition in Paris in 1936. Little wonder that a press advertisement from the 1930s described it as “the receiver for the most demanding”.

Polyphon

The presented exhibit is a musical instrument in the form of a music box made of wood. It is carved and has a glazed door. Inside the box is a playing mechanism with a metal disc.

Signal trumpet banner

The flame for the signal trumpet was a decorative element used during solemn speeches. A trumpeter was present in the full-time squadron of the cavalry regiment, as well as on the regular posts of infantry riflemen as well as medium machine gun and artillery units. In the field...

Hurdy-gurdy from Łękawka

Hurdy-gurdy was an instrument known across Europe whose history dates back to the Medieval period. In the Polish territories, as early as the beginning of the 20th century, the tradition of playing this instrument was in decline. A hurdy-gurdy was one of the instruments used to perform church, court and folk music. Hurdy-gurdy performances accompanied dances and songs.

Hurdy gurdy

A string and keyboard musical instrument. A rectangular box with keys and the complete playing mechanism is placed on the upper board. The shape of the instrument is similar to a violin. The upper board is made of coniferous wood, the bottom of beech wood.

Clavichord

We do not know much about this exhibit. It is a typical clavichord which — as a separate musical instrument — appeared in the 14th century. The use of clavichords spread in the 1st half of the 16th century. The one from the collection of the Museum of Ziemia Biecka came from the 18th century, from the time when the clavichord reached its final shape; among other features, it was equipped with legs.

“Polish” violin

The so-called “Polish” violin. Its original bow has not survived. The violin was made by Antoni Hybel from Ropa, a village situated close to Gorlice. The then press wrote about the instrument in 1925: “because of this invention, a complete reform of the structure of a violin took place.

“Heligonka” folk accordion

A heligonka is a folk variation of the accordion. The instrument was first mentioned in the eighteenth century, when—in 1829—the organ and piano master, Cyril Demain, was granted a patent for the manufacture of heligonkas in Vienna. Soon, their serial production had begun...

Bow harp

Between 1882 and 1885 (although Poland did not exist on world maps), the first Polish Research Expedition to Africa was conducted. It was the first Polish research project to ever have been run in Africa. The exhibition was curated by the exhibition originator Stefan Szolc-Rogoziński.

Tube gramophone

The mechanism of the gramophone is placed in a box made of oak wood in a natural colour. The casing is modestly decorated with simple mills, the front wall bears a metal brass secession plate depicting the muse, Erato.

Mikiphone pocket phonograph

The phonograph has a spring drive mechanism and is designed to play discs that have a diameter of 10 to 25 cm at 33 rpm. It is sometimes described as the walkman of the Victorian era and the great-grandfather of the iPod. It is an example of one of the first pocket-size and movable devices for playing music.

Urban Bell

In the upper part of the bell resonator is a date, “1382”, written in Roman numerals, which helped identify the date of the casting of the bell. It is also decorated with ornamentation. In the middle of the resonator is a frieze decorated with a curved line. Above it there are three plaques depicting the crucifixion scene placed at equal intervals.

Bagpipes

Podhale bagpipes — known in the local dialect as koza, dudy, dudzicki and gajdy. The Podhale bagpipes are a four-toned instrument from the reed aerophone group. They consist of a leather bag that is the air reservoir necessary to blow into the pipes, the bellows; a mouthpiece with which the piper blows into the instrument (duhac), a drone pipe (bąk), and a short triple melody and drone pipe on which the piper plays (gajdzica), set in a wooden casing resembling a goat’s head.

Zither

Coming probably from Turkey, a beautifully decorated zither from the turn of the 19th century; artistic handwork. A bottom board of a sound box is made of a coniferous tree wood, glued together out of three parts, painted dark brown. Veneered sides, the top part of the sound box from the edge to the tailpiece is covered with parchment leather; the string nodes are made of bone.

Under Window Tapestry with the figures playing the shells

It belongs to a series of fourteen tapestries designed to be hung under window sills. Most of them were damaged. After they had been taken to Russia in 1795, they were cut and sewn together to form semi-circular over-window or over-door tapestries. Upon their recovery from the Soviet Union in 1922, they were unstitched and put back together to reconstruct their original appearance. In the middle of the horizontal frieze, there is a metal vase supported on lion paws, filled with fruit and leaves. A huge eggplant and zucchini spill out of the vase. On both its sides, on a frame linking all the elements, two putti are perched, one of them with a bow and a quiver.

Under-Window Tapestry with Music-Making Figures

On the central axis of the tapestry, there is a large vase with fruit and flowers entwined with snakes, which support it. On either side of the vase, a putto is cradled in the framework of decorative strips. Each is props himself up with one hand on the frame and the other on the body of a snakes. In the corners of the tapestry, two musicians are depicted – an older bearded man playing the hurdy-gurdy and a young blonde woman holding a drum.

Statuette of a Singing Monkey of the “Monkey Orchestra” series

Monkeys were the subject matter of an iconographic genre called Singerie and so were a popular depiction in the 18th century. The genre was based on the art of Jean Berain which was published in 1711. Scenes of dancing, playing and hunting monkeys wearing fashionable clothes decorated the interiors of royal palaces in Marly, Anet or Chantilly. Realistic looking monkeys were often modelled by Kändler.

Statuette of a Monkey Playing the Horn of the “Monkey Orchestra” series

Monkeys were the subject matter of an iconographic genre called Singerie and so were a popular depiction in the 18th century. The genre was based on the art of Jean Berain which was published in 1711. Scenes of dancing, playing and hunting monkeys wearing fashionable clothes decorated the interiors of royal palaces in Marly, Anet or Chantilly. Realistic looking monkeys were often modelled by Kändler.