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“Model worker” by Andrzej Wróblewski

The portrait entitled Model worker represents a man dressed in blue work clothes with the collar of a white shirt poking out. The model is rendered en trois quarts. His short hair is neatly combed, smoothly clinging to the head, and his face seems emotionless.

Interior view of the Franciscan cloisters in Kraków

Ferdynand Olesiński received the second competition prize of 20 guilders in 1875, awarded by the management of the Society of Friends of Fine Arts for a perspective drawing. Olesiński then made a pencil sketch depicting the cloisters at the Franciscan church in Kraków. Perspective drawing was one of the subjects taught at the second branch of the Kraków School of Fine Arts. The students also learned drawing still life, copying and drawing head contours.

Łukasz Surowiec, “Erwin, 48” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Łukasz Surowiec, “Eugeniusz, 63” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Honza Zamojski, “Modernism”

Honza Zamojski’s video, entitled Modernism, is an attempt to critically look at the phenomenon of modernism in architecture. The artist reduces the ideas underlying this trend to a simple pattern of repetitive action seen on the screen. As a result of a looped gesture of arranging round cookies, placing one on another, a kind of a tower is created, which, in a distant association, evokes materialized assumptions of modernist architecture, manifested in simple geometrical forms, abandoning decorativeness and ornamentation, reducing the body of the building to an abstract structure.

Jan Hoeft, untitled (+ 48 XX XXX XXXXX)

Jan Hoeft initiated an artistic intervention taking place on the border of visibility: in the middle of a vast lawn in Kraków’s Błonia Park, he placed a ten-metre-long sculpture, made of stainless steel, deliberately resembling a scaled-up barrier (easily restored if necessary). Over its frame, a white and red scarf was slung, reminiscent of the colours sported by the fans of the nearby football clubs, Cracovia and Wisła. In place of the club’s name, a phone number was embroidered, the use of which resulted in drawing the caller into a remote performance, following the scenario prepared by the artist.

Rafani, untitled (“On Invisible”)

The performance On Invisible by the Czech collective Rafani, was staged simultaneously in one of the exhibition halls of the Bunkier Sztuki Gallery and in the urban space. In the gallery spaces, it was witnessed by people who intentionally arrived at the event; these witnesses, however, met only the lecturer, a poet from Kraków, and the slammer, Jan Paweł Kowalewicz (a.k.a. Roman Boryczko), connected using the telephone conference method with five performers.

Young-hae Chang Heavy Industries, bez tytułu (Aneta. Monument for Kraków)

Aneta. Monument to Kraków – this is an example of a work related to the current of internet art and concrete poetry. The Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries duo, who are responsible for its creation, consistently uses one visual form in its creative work. It consists of words animated and displayed on a white background, in a characteristic font. In subsequent works, only the rhythm in which words appear on the screen changes, and the content of words that become a visual poem. The texts are read by a lector or are synchronized with accompanying jazz music. In the case of work carried out for the Bunkier Sztuki Gallery, we deal with a record without a musical background. We only hear the voice that reads the words – alternately in Polish (by the poet and slammer Jan Kowalewicz) and English (by a member of Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries – Marc Voge).

Wojciech Doroszuk, “Reisefieber”

A project by Wojciech Doroszuk called Reisefieber concerns the problem of economic migration. During his stay in Berlin, the artist played the role of a newcomer from the East and was employed in the service sectors which are usually entrusted to emigrants. Based on his experience, five films and photography have been created, that form a multi-layered story of everyday, ordinary life in a foreign country, including both paid work and leisure activities, for example, participation in mass events organized in the city space. In each situation, the hero is shown as a stereotypical stranger, deprived of the will and the possibility of joining indigenous members of the community.

Cecylia Malik, Piotr Pawlus, “6 rivers”

The movie 6 rivers, made in 2012, by the artist and camera operator Piotr Pawlus, is a record of an unusual journey along a waterway. It recalled the names of the six rivers of Kraków and showed their endangered beauty. The winding tributaries of the Wisła—Rudawa, Wilga, Dłubnia, Prądnik — which meander through narrow channels across post-industrial areas, burned stubble and riparian forests, echoing with bird song, pose quite a challenge for potential travellers. It is only during the last leg of their journey, that Malik and Pawlus navigate through settlements, housing estates and allotment gardens, more readily recognizable to Kraków’s inhabitants. In a boat of her own making, the artist negotiates mist-shrouded tunnels with branches hanging low above the water and echoing passageways; she goes through clusters of rubbish and the trunks of fallen trees; she struggles with fast stream currents, to finally sail out into the lazily sprawling waters of the Wisła. Using poetic imagery ranging between a documentary, a musical clip, and video work, she creates an obscure and atmospheric image of Kraków, in which the city’s outskirts get the upper hand over its centre.

Łukasz Surowiec, “Piotr, 46” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Łukasz Surowiec, “Zofia, 50” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Łukasz Surowiec, “Zbigniew, 60” from the cycle “Carts”

Łukasz Surowiec’s activities focus on the area of important social problems such as exclusion, homelessness, and poverty. The artist explores the relationships within marginalized groups and the perception of their representatives by other members of society. He creates prototypes of radical social actions, thanks to which he interferes with the reality of people functioning outside the capitalist system.

Janek Simon, “Ryugyong Hotel”

Janek Simon’s interests include theories and models as well as scientific disciplines, such as geography and economics, which are subject to evolution along with civilizational changes. His works have an experimental and anarchic character, reflecting the clash of scientific theories with the reality of everyday life. His works are prototypes, models, and complicated electronic systems, created according to the principle Do It Yourself by the artists himself. He incessantly seeks extra-systemic solutions, which allow him to break away from contemporary art of a capitalist character.

Karol Radziszewski, “Study for the Wounded Insurgent”

Karol Radziszewski’s work consists of six photographs and a drawing made on their basis. The cycle is considered a preparatory study for the mural, which was to be created in 2009 at the Mur Sztuki Gallery, located in the Museum of the Warsaw Uprising. However, the work did not come to fruition, because it was considered too erotic and detrimental to the feelings of the museum’s public.

Little Warsaw, “Yellow House”

As part of the project implemented in the Bunkier Sztuki Gallery, the Little Warsaw collective initiated a two-day public situation held inside the Gallery. For the performance, Gálik and Havas invited a group of over a dozen previously selected participants, with whom they commenced an artistic and research process. The latter referred to the titular Yellow House, which was the name locally assigned to the Lipótmező hospital, founded in 1868 in Budapest.

Karolina Kowalska, “A window onto the winter”

The motifs of urban everyday life as an illusory sign of economic prosperity prevail in Karolina Kowalska’s works. Streets, blocks of flats, and office buildings appear next to intimate apartment interiors and impersonal infrastructure. The architectural and media indicators of capitalism determine the area of human activity, rendering the world of nature a luxurious addition. The artist manipulates their images, pushing them into everyday realities and, with a hint of irony, transforming them. Thus, her photographs, films, installations, and objects reveal in a nuanced, jocular manner, the influence of urban cityscape on individuals and relationships and propose slightly improved variants. The projects realized by the artists combine music, visual art, and text at times.

Nicolas Grospierre, “The House Which Grows”

The project by Nicolas Grospierre, The house which grows, tackles the problem of the gap between aesthetics and the functionality of architecture. In his work, the artist is interested in forms of modernist architecture and in how the very possibility of establishing universal public housing led to the fall of this utopian project.

Barbara Bańda, “Daily news”

The cycle Everyday news is a visual record of press cuttings, processed by the artist. Basia Bańda was inspired by the headlines from local, internet news portals of Lesser Poland (Kraków.wyborcza.pl, gazeta.pl), which became titles of thirty collages. Tragic events prevail amongst them: unfortunate accidents (The passenger lost her leg under the wheels of the train), acts of violence (A man from the coast beat a woman in Nowy Targ), disappearances (She disappeared around Wielka Krokwia), murders (Murder on Budryk Street. The police are looking for the stabber), incidents of devastation (He damaged 36 cars. Prosecutor: prison and damage repair). People’s dramas intertwine with equally catastrophic information from the world of nature (Dead fish in the Biała river – investigation discontinued). Most misfortunes chosen by the artist and described in the press concern individuals, and their impact on the life of the local community is negligible.

Two creative sketches of the Manggha building by Arata Isozaki

According to legend, when Andrzej Wajda received a prize from the Inamori Foundation and promised that he would spend this prize on a new house of the Far East art collection, Arata Isozaki, the architect, declared that he would prepare the design of the future centre and donate it as a gift. And so it happened.