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Drawing for the performance “Wielopole, Wielopole” by Tadeusz Kantor

This invaluable drawing presents the scene: “Properly handling the invention of Mr. Daguerre: the military way” of the first act of the work, Wielopole, Wielopole, directed by Tadeusz Kantor. The drawing has watermarks. The composition was made with ink and pencil and placed in a black cardboard passe-partout. The outline of the female photographer is marked in black ink. The woman is absorbed in the action of photographing/shooting.

Painting “Szymanowski's portrait” by Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz

Karol Szymanowski met Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz in Zakopane in the summer of 1904. The acquaintance quickly turned into many years of friendship. In March and April 1905, they travelled around Italy together and met in Zakopane on many occasions. Szymanowski dedicated his I Piano Sonata in C minor Op. 8 composed in the period 1903—1904 “to Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz” (it was published in print in 1910).

Painting “Portrait of a woman” by Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz

On women and other demons... The art collection from the Tatra Museum features several dozens of works by Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz, aka Witkacy. These include landscapes, drawings and portraits. Among the works depicting by Nena Stachurska, Bronisława Włodarska, Janina Turowska-Leszczyńska and Józef Fedorowicz, there are two images of a lady whose first and last name is unknown.

Painting “Caricature of Stanislaw Witkiewicz” by Kazimierz Sichulski

A well-known Polish proverb says that laughter is good for you. Hence, ancient theatre already knew comedies and the art of caricature. Artur Schrőder wrote that the caricature "must recreate the real, true features of the model, exaggerated and accentuated in a specific, comical way, but in a way that the audience could easily recognise. A caricaturist must be an excellent psychologist."

Painting “Caricature of Jacek Malczewski” by Kazimierz Sichulski

Zakopane, located at the foot of the Tatra Mountains, surrounded by a picturesque landscape, used to be a paradise for all kinds of artists. Besides inspirations they could come across at every turn, they could also experience true creative and intellectual freedom there.

Painting “Helenka with a Vase” by Stanisław Wyspiański

Portraits of children occupy a special place in Wyspiański’s artistic oeuvre. Without the unnecessary sentimentalism, treated in a natural, affectionate manner with a great dose of sensitivity and realism, and captured in new and unexpected depictions, they refreshed the usual connotations related to this genre.

Painting “Self-portrait with wife” by Stanisław Wyspiański

Wyspiański left twelve self-portraits. Every one of them is a fascinating record of the physical change and current emotional state of the artist according to his often-repeated belief stating that “man (...) changes irretrievably; they are changed by their experiences and thoughts. A portrait is a reflection of a moment, an artistic reflection seizing things in their very essence.”

“Golden Pavillon in Kyoto” — a drawing by Andrzej Wajda

On 10 November 1987, Andrzej Wajda received the Kyoto Prize for his lifetime achievements in the field of the arts. During a few days spent in Kyoto, the former capital city of Japan, he sketched more than a dozen drawings depicting the places he had visited. They included two views of Kinkakuji (Jap. Golden Pavillon), one of the most exquisite places of the city. The name of the building is derived from the decoration of the walls which are covered with petals of gold.

“Stanisław Lem — Lifelike” — a drawing by Andrzej Wajda

In the collection of the Manggha Museum, there are 242 portraits by Andrzej Wajda in the Familiar faces series. One of them is a drawing signed by the author — Stanisław Lem — Lifelike. Indeed, the author has captured the resemblance perfectly using hatching and many strong lines, as in the case of the many other drawings of the series sketched on notebook pages or graph paper.

“Fish” — a drawing by Andrzej Wajda

In Japan, carps are a symbol identified with boys, who wish to become as strong and persistent as those fish. Each year, during Japanese Children's Day, which formerly was solely Boys' Day, parents hang kites on flagpoles located near their houses resembling wind socks that indicate the strength and direction of the wind. They are in the shape of carps, and the colour of each carp is related to the person it symbolises: the black carp is for the father, the red one — for mother, other colours are for children. According to old beliefs, flags are hung high in order to attract the attention of protective gods that are high in the sky.

“Kiyomizu-dera, the Shrine of Clear Water” by Andrzej Wajda

In Kyoto, the former imperial capital city, you can find Kiyomizu–dera (清水寺), a complex of Buddhist shrines whose name derives from the waterfall of the river flowing on the hillside of Mount Higashiyama. The main pavilion of the shrine is dedicated to Goddess Kannon (a bodhisattva personifying compassion), and it is one of the most popular tourist attractions, famous for its vantage point based on a six-storey structure. Crowds of visitors come to this place both in spring, when the cherry trees are in bloom, and in autumn, when the maple leaves turn red.

Two creative sketches of the Manggha building by Arata Isozaki

According to legend, when Andrzej Wajda received a prize from the Inamori Foundation and promised that he would spend this prize on a new house of the Far East art collection, Arata Isozaki, the architect, declared that he would prepare the design of the future centre and donate it as a gift. And so it happened.

“Fugu” — a drawing by Andrzej Wajda

The fish depicted in the drawing is fugu (Latin Takifugu rubripes — a pufferfish), famous for the poison which can be found in its entrails (in particular, in its liver and ovaries), and spawn. The poison is tetrodotoxin, whose toxicity is many times stronger than the toxicity of cyanide. Because of the risk one takes while eating dishes made of fugu, this fish has a crowd of enthusiasts — those who gladly order fugu dishes prepared by qualified chefs, and artists who think about this fish as a motif in films and literature, an instrument of crime or suicide...

Dan Perjovschi, “MOCAK Kraków Notebook”

Minimalism of style and verbal content, linked by an ingenious concept. The drawings allude to social, economic and artistic issues. The stance is critical: witty but also marked by bitterness.

Karol Radziszewski, “Study for the Wounded Insurgent”

Karol Radziszewski’s work consists of six photographs and a drawing made on their basis. The cycle is considered a preparatory study for the mural, which was to be created in 2009 at the Mur Sztuki Gallery, located in the Museum of the Warsaw Uprising. However, the work did not come to fruition, because it was considered too erotic and detrimental to the feelings of the museum’s public.

“Borghese gladiator” by Antoni Stopa

Antoni Stopa, a painter, writer and agrarian activist, was born on 5 August 1849 in a peasant family living in a hamlet on Mount Ostrysz near Maków (now Maków Podhalański). Stopa created under many pseudonyms, many of which related to his ancestry: AS, As, Antoni Sygoń, Antoni Sygoń of Babia Góra, Pauper of Maków, Boruta, Peasant from Babia Góra, Peasant from a village, Świtoniec, Jan Kwaśny, Jantek of Ostrysa, Jaźwiec, Kitaj, LM, Leszczak, Walenty Sygoń, Ostrysiak and Racławiak.

“Interior view of the Franciscan cloisters in Kraków” by Ferdynand Olesiński

Ferdynand Olesiński received the second competition prize of 20 guilders in 1875, awarded by the management of the Society of Friends of Fine Arts for a perspective drawing. Olesiński then made a pencil sketch depicting the cloisters at the Franciscan church in Kraków. Perspective drawing was one of the subjects taught at the second branch of the School of Fine Arts in Kraków. The students also learned drawing still life, copying and drawing head contours.

“Naked young man” by Stanisław Radziejowski

Stanisław Józef Rafał Dominik Radziejowski was born to a landowning family in Zegartowice near Wieliczka. He probably started studying at the School of Fine Arts in Kraków in the academic year 1874/1875 and he is thought to have only studied for one year. However, this information has not been confirmed. Certainly, Radziejowski studied at the School of Fine Arts during the period 1880–1885 and 1888–1891 in the composition department of Jan Matejko. During his studies, he received several awards...

“A fragment of the design of a mural” by Karol Kamieński

Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;}The painter Karol Kamieński, also mistakenly called Dominik, was the son of Maciej Kamieński, a Polish composer of Slovakian origin. We have sparse information about the artist’s life. What is known is that in 1792 he lived at Piwna Street in Warsaw. Thanks to the help of his father, he managed to find his way into the court of King Stanisław August Poniatowski.

“Interior design” by Karol Kamieński

Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;}The painter Karol Kamieński, also mistakenly called Dominik, was the son of Maciej Kamieński, a Polish composer of Slovakian origin. We have sparse information about the artist’s life. What is known is that in 1792 he lived at Piwna Street in Warsaw. Thanks to the help of his father, he managed to find his way into the court of King Stanisław August Poniatowski.