List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Objects
all museums
Clean selection
Show filters
Hide filters

Fishskin jacket

A jacket sewn of tanned sea fishskin as protective wear for an Aleut child. Jackets and waterproof capes made of fishskin or intestines of sea mammals were worn over clothes made of seal or reindeer leather. The jackets provided protection against wind and water, being a necessary element during seal hunting trips.

The “Christ on the Cross” icon

Helena Dąbczańska is a famous Lviv collector of incunabula, engravings, books, drawings, fabrics and furniture; the owner of a private museum organized in her own villa and the hostess on artistic Sunday mornings for representatives of the Lviv elite at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Esther’s scroll in a cover

Megilla it's a parchment scroll with a Hebrew manuscript of the Book. It was designed for individual reading at home and in a synagogue in the period of the early spring holiday of Purim.

Icon “Our Lady Hodegetria surrounded by prophets and saints”

This icon is the oldest in the collection of Nowy Sącz. The exhibit was added to the collection in 1977, after a sale offer was made by people living in Nowa Wieś, on a farm which was assigned to Polish settlers after the deportation of the Lemkos in 1947.

Hanukkah lamp

Chanukija is an oil lamp designed for lighting symbolical lights to commemorate the renewal of the cult in the Temple of Jerusalem after the victorious Maccabean Revolt in 165 BC.

Icon “St. Nicholas”

St. Nicholas is one of the most popular saints in Rus and Greece. He was the bishop of Myra in Asia Minor. His iconic representation was shaped at the beginning of the second millennium. The complex series which illustrate his life come from the 12th century. In panel painting, the story of his life was presented in the strip surrounding the main field of the painting, containing several smaller paintings. The central figure of St. Nicholas was presented as an old man, in bishop’s attire, in the half-figure or full-figure portrait depiction.

Sheepskin coat (lachowski)

An outfit was one of the ways of proving your wealth in one village of the Lendians (Lachowie). In winter, on holidays, Sundays, and fair days, the wealthiest farmers wore Hungarian sheepskin coats made from white tanned leather. Coats were long, with a fold at the waist, and a large semi-circular collar made from black lambskin falling down the back, with which they wrapped their heads during blizzards.

Pulpit with images of the Holy Fathers of the Church

The exhibit comes from an Orthodox church in the village of Królowa Ruska (after the displacement of the Lemkos, it was named Królowa Górna). Originally, the pulpit consisted of three parts: a canopy with an image of the Holy Spirit, a basket and a casing of the stairs with a balustrade in the form of a rhomboid board, with a painted representation of a two-horse cart with the prophet Elijah rising to the sky on a fiery cloud.

Etrog tin

An etrog tin in the shape of a pomegranate with three leaves, oxidised and open in the middle. The exhibit presumably belonged to rich Jews, as only they could afford such a decorated, silver container, used to carry the etrog to a synagogue on the holiday of Sukkot.

Torah scroll

The parchment scroll containing text of the Five Books of Moses, i.e. the Books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy was hand-written in Hebrew, rolled onto two sticks; the so-called ace(i) chaim [shafts of life] made of oak wood was furnished at the ends with pairs of wooden plates with a diameter of 17.5 cm, and handles for rolling the scrolls. The handles are profiled, with a head decorated with ivory buttons in the upper part and an ivory sleeve at the bottom.

The Babylonian Talmud

The Talmud is the most important compilation of the oral Torah, that was revealed to Moses on Mount Sinai. It is a commentary, an explanation, and a discussion. Before the Talmud, there was the Mishnah, to which Talmud is an extension. There are two Talmuds—the Jerusalem Talmud and the Babylonian Talmud—whose 1831 edition is presented in our collection. The process of editing the former was completed in the 4th century AD in Palestine, in the academies of Caesarea, Sepphoris, and Tiberias. The latter was completed a little later, at the beginning of the 6th century AD in Babylonia, in the academies of Sura, Nehardea, and Pumbedita. It is far more extensive than the Jerusalem Talmud.

Manuscript “Divrei David” of Dawid ben Jakub

The words of David. Commentary on the Jewish calendar. In the introduction the author writes that the knowledge concerning the Jewish calendar is scattered in the papers of Rishonim and Acharonim (medieval and later scholars), and from generation to generation slowly fades away due to the small number of those who could understand and practice in this area.

Bonnet of a Jewess

The bonnet has been in the collection since 1960, yet is not known how came to be included there. Four photographs from the exhibit are preserved in the Museum’s archives, purchased in the late 1960s or early 1970s. On the reverse side there is a note stating that the bonnet's owner was Ludwika Popardowska from Brzezna, a village near Nowy Sącz, and it was her mother’s memorabilia.

Lemko corset

The presented corset comes from the village of Rozdziele. Corsets (lajbyky) were worn by Lemko women – brides and young married women. They were worn over blouses.

Lemko coif (“czepec”)

A coif (czepec) was an obligatory headgear for married Lemko women. It has the form of a shallow cap consisting of a horseshoe-shaped bottom folded in the bottom part and a surrounding rim with rounded edges.

Lemko skirt “kabat”

SA Lemko skirt, or kabat, was made of modrotrotnik – thin printed factory fabric with a pattern of small yellow flowers and small green stars. It was hand-sewn at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. Such fabrics were made in the towns of the southern part of the Carpathians, in Bardiov, as well as in Krynica and Muszyna.

Hanukkah lamp

The eight-branched candelabrum made in honour of the Hanukkah festival – the victorious Maccabean Revolt. The festival – recorded in the books of Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) – is over 2,000 years old.

Orava clock

This is a domestic wall clock with a pendulum, having an escapement with a drive and a signalling mechanism chiming the hours. It is also equipped with a weight drive. The whole mechanism is placed in a wooden casing with a bell and a hammer at the top.

Women’s outfit lendian

Kęty and its surrounding areas had been inhabited by the Lendians for centuries. Female costume is one of the few examples of Lendian culture which have survived to the present day, n examples of which are presented at the museum in Kęty. Single examples of such costumes could still be seen on the streets of Kęty in the 1970s.

Manuscript “The privilege of Stanisław Koniecpolski for Jews from Tarnów” with a seal

Jewish settlements in Poland began during the period of the Piast dynasty and increased in the 14th-16th centuries. At first, Jews settled in larger towns, in search of better living conditions. The first Jews arrived in Tarnów in the mid-15th century. The proof of this is the mention of Kafel, a Jew, which can be found in the court files of Lviv from 1445.