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Zoomorphic vessel (Chimú culture)

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger from 1876. It has two circular bellies and two beaks: one in the shape of a bird’s head, the other one tall and straight, both conjoined with a curved handle. On the belly, there are panels with straps of...

Zoomorphic vessel (Chancay Culture)

The vessel comes from the 1876 Peruvian collection of Władysław Kluger. The hollow, zoomorphic figurine most likely represents a llama. It was made of a ceramic material, then coated with a light-coloured slip and white paint, which is most noticeable on the muzzle of the animal.

Zoomorphic vessel

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger, it is from 1876. It has the shape of the lama head with wide outflow.

Wooden apothecary boxes from 18th century

Drewniane puszki apteczne pochodzą z drugiej połowy XVIII wieku. Naczynia wykonane z drewna lipowego zostały pokryte warstwą polichromii w kolorze czerwonym. Na brzuścu w owalnym, rokokowym, ozdobionym złotym ornamentem kartuszu umieszczono nazwy surowców, do których przechowywania były...

Włocławek cup

The Włocławek cup is the most precious and one of the oldest exhibits of decorative art from the collections at the National Museum in Kraków. It was made in the 1st half of the 10th century, presumably in a workshop located on the territory of Lorraine or Alemannia.

Wineskin with a lug

The ceramic wineskin with a lug has a bulky body and a simple spout. The vessel has been formed by hand in a primitive workshop.

Welcoming goblet

Welcome cup was a decorative container for drinking beer in guild inns during important celebrations. Its Polish name wilkom comes from the German greeting willkommen [welcome]. Each newly arrived guest had to empty the cup filled with an alcoholic beverage in honour of the guild. The production of such cups developed in Germany in the 2nd half of the 16th century, and later spread throughout Europe.

Wedding goblet of Marcin Mikołaj Radziwiłł of the “Trąby” coat of arms and Aleksandra née Bełchacka of the “Topór” coat of arms

The glassworks in Naliboki, in the estate of the Nieśwież line of the Radziwiłł family, was founded in 1722 by Anna née Sanguszko Radziwiłł, the widow of Karol Stanisław. The glass factory was very modern, superbly organised, and was no worse a plant than European ones.

Vessels for fragrant substances

The presented vessels have the shape of small amphoras and are made of clay. The former is decorated with primitive plant patterns and the lug has been, it seems, knocked off, with the body extending at the top. The latter vessel has a pair of lugs and a body extending at the bottom, on which a relief representation of two figures occupied by an object is visible. The irregularities in the shape of the vessels and their primitive ornamentation indicate the early period of their creation and the simple craftsmanly workshop.

Vessel with an openwork lid for potpourri compositions made from dried flowers

This porcelain vase in the form of an urn, with openings in the lid, is intended for storing potpourris, i.e. scented mixtures made from dried herbs and flowers. This vessel with a circular cross-section and a body expanding at the top is covered by a lid with tear-shaped openings, crowned by a handle in the form of a flower bud.

Vessel with an artistic representation of symplegma

A man and a woman in an erotic scene are shown on the chest which imitates a bed. Both figures are naked, with their long hair reaching down to their shoulders with strongly marked eyes, noses and half-open mouths. The stirrup-shaped ear connects the back of the man with the side-surface of the bed, which is covered with a geometric ornament.

Vessel in the shape of the Polish Eagle

At present, the tableware of the Polish royal court is known to us almost exclusively from archive materials. The majority of preserved single items or their designs come from Augsburg – the most important centre of the European goldsmithery in the 17th and 18th centuries. Among these items, the most outstanding is the state set of John Casimir Vasa.

Vessel in the shape of a warrior’s head

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger from 1876. It has the shape of a warrior’s head with a band. On its sides there are large protruding ears with earrings. The eyes of the warrior are almond-like, with slightly hooded eyelids. The face is of a geometrised shape.

Vessel for vaseline

The porcelain vaseline vessel has a cylindrical shape and a metal lid. The body of the vessel has been painted on the glass into cobalt-coloured patterns. The black inscription “Vaselinum” is flanked by swans positioned alternately.

Vessel for potpourri – mixtures of dried flowers

The porcelain vase in the form of an urn, with openings in the lid, was intended for storing potpourris, i.e. scented mixtures made from dried herbs and flowers. The body of the vessel has a circular cross-section, is elongated, narrows at the base and turns into a round base on a square stand.

Vase for compositions made from dried flowers

This porcelain vase takes the form of a cup-shaped urn with holes in the lid. The dish is designed for making compositions from dried flowers. Its large, hemispherical body rests on a multi-stage stand with a circular cross-section, based on a square with bevelled corners.

Two apothecary vessels

Vessels in the form of a monstrance for storing medicinal oils come from the convent pharmacy of Brothers Hospitallers of St. John of God in Cieszyn. The pharmacy began its functioning in the 1690s. At the time, the monastery in Cieszyn was founded, together with a hospital and a pharmacy run by monks. The vessels are decorated with white Rococo cartouches with gold borders. Inside the cartouches there are apothecary inscriptions in two-coloured majuscule: Ol. Cinnamomi — cinnamon oil — on one of the jars, and Ol. Macis — nutmeg oil — on the other.

Tin mug

The tin mug has a profiled base and bottom part of the body; slightly expanded at the top. The vessel is devoid of decorations.

Teapot with lid

This early form of the teapot, the design of which is ascribed to Johann Jakob Irminger, was amended by a painted decoration outside the factory more than twenty years after the vessel had been finished. The linear, graphical method of painting was ascribed to Christian Daniel Buschow, who operated in Bayreuth.

Tea container

Along with the growing popularisation of overseas beverages such as coffee, tea and chocolate, European manufactories also designed vessels used to hold them. At the beginning, they were modelled on familiar Chinese or Japanese forms, but then, gradually, the models took on new shapes unknown to the East.