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Siberian ski

It is worth paying attention to the unusual shape of the ski. Its width and length (204 cm), as well as the square-cut back, indicate that it is a type intermediate between the arctic and southern ski. It comes from the western part of the USSR. What is also interesting, is the hole in the front of the ski, which allows for a string to be threaded through it, in order to pull the ski behind, while supporting oneself with a pole if need be.

Siberian birch ski

It is worth noting the characteristic shape (side carving) and the material—birch wood—which is exceptionally light, but, due to its lack of durability, was used very rarely for the production of skis; ash wood, beech wood, or—in special cases—hickory wood was usually used instead.

Sneakers of Karol Wojtyła

Sneakers are usually an attribute of children’s games. The ones in the collection of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums are big (size 44!). Judging from the state of preservation, they were used by Karol Wojtyła many times when hiking. His love for sport was inculcated in Karol by his brother, 14 years older Edmund, who played in a football team. Very often Karol accompanied him; however, due to the age difference he could not run on a football pitch.

Register of the flights of a lieutenant pilot Stefania Wojtulanis-Karpińska (“Barbara”)

Stefania Wojtulanis-Karpińska “Barbara” was actively involved in all types of aviation sports, starting with her participation — as a navigator — in the National Balloon Competition in 1936. In 1938, she participated — also as a navigator — in the 8th National Air Competition; in May 1939, Stefania competed in the Ninth National Balloon Championships as a balloon pilot.

Bike

Tadeusz Seweryn (1894–1975) — Director of the Ethnographic Museum in Kraków — describes this bike in the scientific catalogue sheet as follows: ”A bike made of wood by a cattleman, Franciszek Gucwa. The full wheels (spokeless) are connected with wooden ploughs. The front one has handlebars, heavily fitted with iron at the place where it is connected to the axis of the bike.

Mountain ski from Norway

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Paddle of Karol Wojtyła

The presented object is a wooden paddle, joined in the middle (screwed-on, detachable), which served Karol Wojtyła during canoeing trips with young people. The ends of the paddle are covered with metal; it is coloured brown and made of natural wood.

Priest Karol Wojtyła’s canoe

Pelikan II tourist canoe used by Priest Karol Wojtyła during holiday trips with academic youth. The so-called Kamyk [pebble] was financed by Teresa Życzkowska (using the name Heydel at that time) and Priest Karol Wojtyła. It was used for the first time during a canoeing rally down the Słupia River in 1956.

“Telemark” ski from the end of 19th century

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Adam Małysz ski

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Jumping ski

The history of ski jumping in Poland dates back to the early 20th century. The first world records were beaten by Sondre Norheim from Norway (30.5 m in 1860). These days, jumps have lengths of more than 240 metres (Adam Małysz has jumped 225 m; in the 2012/2013 season, Piotr Żyła and Kamil Stoch reached lengths of 232.5 m).

“Henryk Jordan’s Park”

The photograph shows an alley in Henryk Jordan’s Park with two distant busts of famous personalities. The white marble-sculpted busts are a noteworthy detail, the Barthesian punctum, or the intriguing elements of the picture. The bushes make up an evenly trimmed hedge. It is a stereoscopic photograph, a single print with two separate shots.

Ski-boots of Karol Wojtyła

Czarne skórzane buty narciarskie należały do Karola Wojtyły. Lewy but z pary jest bardziej zniszczony.

Mountain ski from Scandinavia

Normal 0 21 false false false PL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Standardowy; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; border:none;} A characteristic feature of the northern skis—used in the Scandinavian Peninsula and in Finland—was the disproportion in the length of two skis in one pair: one was longer (the one exhibited in the collection of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums measures 260 cm) and is additionally equipped with a sliding groove; the other, shorter one was used for pushing off (in the case of the present exhibit, the other ski has not survived).

“Telemark” ski from 1919

A characteristic feature of telemark skiing was the release of the foot: the shoe was attached to the ski only with the tips of the toes. The ski — which is in the collection of the Małopolska’s Virtual Museums — is a special type of telemark ski, because of the innovation that the creator of a new type of binding, Bilgeri...

Priest Karol Wojtyła’s sports shoes

Walking shoes used by priest Karol Wojtyła during trips. The shoes are made of a brown patent leather with cotton shoelaces...

Karol Wojtyła's skis with poles

The burgundy skis, presented in the MVM collection, belonged to Karol Wojtyła. Their characteristic features include the white and blue strip running through the centre, leather straps, and Markeh Automatic fittings.