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“Hydria” apothecary vase

A hydria type apothecary vase. Majolica. Savona (Italy). The 2nd half of the 17th century. Handles in the shape of (fantastic) animal heads on massive bent necks. In the front, at the bottom, there is a relief of a gargoyle. In its mouth there is an opening to pour out the content of the vase, plugged with a standard cork. There are smaller gargoyles without openings on the sides of the vessel, under the handles.

Photograph “Tadeusz Pankiewicz in the company of four people in the duty room”

Dr Roman Glassner is sitting in a dark leather armchair in the middle; on the left is Helena Krywaniuk sitting back on an armchair, leaning against Aurelia Danek who is standing behind her. Dr Leon Glück is sitting back on the seat on the right. Tadeusz Pankiewicz stands behind the armchair in the background.

Wooden apothecary boxes from 18th century

The wooden apothecary boxes come from the 2nd half of the 18th century. The vessels are made of linden wood and covered with red polychrome. On the bellies, in oval Rococo cartouches decorated with gold ornaments there are names of the materials they were to contain.

Apothecary majolica vessel — “albarello”

This is a Maiolica pharmacy albarello vessel, elliptically concave, created in Faenza (Italy) in the mid-sixteenth century. It has blue, green, yellow, and orange figural and plant decoration; its human figure is a herbalist with a headscarf for herbs on her back. The inscription on the banderole reads: Aloe patico.

Majolica apothecary vessel

The maiolica pharmacy jug is decorated with an orange, blue, and green plant ornament. It is worth noting the unusual handle – parallel (not perpendicular) to the jug’s body – thanks to which it was possible to lift and carry such a large and heavy vessel using a lowered hand. Under the handle, there is a mascaron head, resembling that of a lion.

Sister Konstancja Studzińska’s master’s degree diploma

Konstancja Studzińska (1787–1853) was the first woman in Europe to complete a master’s degree — she majored in pharmacy. The fact that a woman completed pharmaceutical studies in the 1st half of the 19th century, when women had no possibility to study, must be recognised as exceptional. At the time, Konstancja Studzińska worked in a pharmacy run by nuns at St. Lazarus hospital in Kraków.

Percolator

A percolator is a device used to extract raw vegetable materials by the method of continuous, slow flow of a solvent through the raw material layer. This method is called percolation (from the Latin percolo, flow) or, less often, displacement. Due to this, extracts that are much richer in active substances than obtained by simple maceration (soaking) are produced.

Pharmaceutical mortar

A late Renaissance mortar in the shape typical of the Low Countries and with a unique silvery colour. The mortar was made by one of leading casters of Deventer, Gerrit Schimmel, and it is part of a pair. The other is dated from 1688 and signed by the same author. It is at present being exhibited in a museum in Rotterdam.

Pharmaceutical tablet maker machine

A hand-held tablet press was used in a pharmacy for the production of tablets obtained by compressing a powdered drug substance using a piston. The presented object comes from the beginning of the 20th century. This tablet press was produced in the Austrian company Kahnemann-Krause-Vienna...

Pill gilding box

The round wooden box presented here was used in a pharmacy for silvering and gilding pills. In this way, their unpleasant taste was made more palatable and they were protected against drying and spoiling. The method of gilding pills may be found in Heinrich and Fabian’s Farmacya (Warsaw, 1835): “Pills, hard, dry and cleaned from powder are put on a pill rolling disc, moistened with a few drops of gum arabic or a regular syrup and, by spinning them a few times, they are covered with the liquid.

Apothecary jar for the dissected human skull

An apothecary jar made of milk glass, decorated in a Rococo style (2nd half of the 18th century). The label is surrounded by a gold ring decorated with a reddish-brown chaplet, buckled in the middle. In the middle of the label there is an inscription in two-colour capital letters: CRAN: HUMN: PPT — a dissected human skull.

Two apothecary vessels

Vessels in the form of a monstrance for storing medicinal oils come from the convent pharmacy of Brothers Hospitallers of St. John of God in Cieszyn. The pharmacy began its functioning in the 1690s. At the time, the monastery in Cieszyn was founded, together with a hospital and a pharmacy run by monks. The vessels are decorated with white Rococo cartouches with gold borders. Inside the cartouches there are apothecary inscriptions in two-coloured majuscule: Ol. Cinnamomi — cinnamon oil — on one of the jars, and Ol. Macis — nutmeg oil — on the other.

Alembic

Alembic (Latin: alembicum) is a part of the apparatus required for distillation (distillation from Latin: distillare—drip, fall by drops). It consists of three separate parts: a boiler in which substances for distillation are placed, a helmet covering the boiler, and a cooler that connects the boiler to the receiver; namely, the place where the liquefied (distilled) liquid flows down.

Stained glass door a mortar surrounded by medicinal plants

The stained-glass window comes from one of the Wrocław pharmacies, for which it was made around 1900, by the workshop of stained-glass windows that belonged to Adolf Seiler in Wrocław. In the centre of the stained-glass window, there is a pharmacy mortar, around which medicinal plants are placed: aconite (Aconitum L.), belladonna (Atropa belladonna L.), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), and purple foxglove (Digitalis purpurea L.).

Marble mortar

18th-century mortar made ​​of red marble, used for grating medicinal ointment.

Pharmaceutical vessel

Pharmaceutical wooden box from 19th century for storing medicinal herbs.

Apothecary vessel

The vessel comes from the 2nd half of the 18th century and is made of colourless glass. There is a little white lettering piece on it with a signature in two-coloured majuscule: ESS. THERIACALIS (Essentia theriacalis) syn. Tinctura theriacalis. The medicine contained, among others, theriac.

Faience apothecary vessel

This is a faience pharmacy vessel with two handles in the shape of mutton heads. On the shard, there is a black italic shelf mark – Syrupus opiatus – water with a sugary, poppy syrup. The preparation was obtained by dissolving poppy extract – opium (Extractum Opii) – in an appropriate amount of concentrated sugar solution.

Pharmaceutical tablet maker machine

Pharmaceutical tablet maker machine from 19th century.

Laboratory press

Prasa apteczna tłokowa służyła do wytłaczania (expressio) surowców roślinnych, wymagających dużej siły nacisku. Otrzymywano w ten sposób soki z owoców, liści i korzeni lub oleje z nasion. Prasa tłokowa składała się z drewnianej podstawy, do której przytwierdzony był...