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Icon “St. Nicholas”

St. Nicholas is one of the most popular saints in Rus and Greece. He was the bishop of Myra in Asia Minor. His iconic representation was shaped at the beginning of the second millennium. The complex series which illustrate his life come from the 12th century. In panel painting, the story of his life was presented in the strip surrounding the main field of the painting, containing several smaller paintings. The central figure of St. Nicholas was presented as an old man, in bishop’s attire, in the half-figure or full-figure portrait depiction.

Pulpit with images of the Holy Fathers of the Church

The exhibit comes from an Orthodox church in the village of Królowa Ruska (after the displacement of the Lemkos, it was named Królowa Górna). Originally, the pulpit consisted of three parts: a canopy with an image of the Holy Spirit, a basket and a casing of the stairs with a balustrade in the form of a rhomboid board, with a painted representation of a two-horse cart with the prophet Elijah rising to the sky on a fiery cloud.

Icon “St. Michael Archangel”

The icon was originally located in an Orthodox church in Szczawnik, a village situated to the north of Muszyna. Its central part is filled with a whole-figure depiction of St. Michael the Archangel, shown en face, who is holding a sword up in his right hand; in his left hand, he is holding a scabbard. The figure is dressed as an armed warrior, with a short tunic, armour and a tied above his left shoulder.

Pyx

The pyx was purchased for the collection in 1998. Probably it is from an unknown village in the Gorlice region. After the war, she was kept at the family of a priest from a local village, as a unused. A pyx (Latin: ciborium, pyxis) is a container used to carry the consecrated host. It takes the form of a cup with a matching lid.

Altar cross (napriestolnyj) with the scene “Crucifixion” and “Resurrection”

The cross comes from an Orthodox church in Bogusza, a village located to the south-east of Nowy Sącz. It is one of the five Lemko napierstolny crosses [altar crosses], which can be found in the Museum in Nowy Sącz. Due to its decorative form, it is displayed in the permanent exhibition of the Orthodox church art.

Tabernacle (Kiwot)

The object comes from an Orthodox church in Jastrzębik, a village located to the south-west of Krynica. It is one of the two Orthodox tabernacles owned by the Museum in Nowy Sącz. These are extremely rare and valuable exhibits due to the time of their creation and rich painting decoration.

Retable in the shape of the iconostasis

The retable comes from an Orthodox church in Izby, a village located near the Slovakian border, to the east of Krynica. It has a unique form modelled on the arrangement of the Subcarpathian iconostasis, though in an architectural frame typical of the altars of the Roman church. It is an example of westernisation, which involves adapting western patterns to eastern culture.

Icon “Crucifiction”

The exhibit comes from an Orthodox church in Szczawnik, a village situated to the north of Muszyna. In the centre of the depiction there is a cross placed on a rock with a skull of Adam, the symbolic Golgotha.

Processional cross with scenes of “Crucifixion” and “Baptism of Christ”

The cross comes from an Orthodox church in Łosie near Krynica. It is one of the nine Orthodox processional crosses in the Museum's collection. Due to the richness of the depictions and its artistic value, it is one of the most valuable among the crosses and is displayed in the permanent exhibition of the Orthodox church art. Like most Lemko processional crosses, it is painted on both sides. On its one side there is a representation of Crucified Christ, on the other – the Baptism of Christ.

Wall-mounted figure “Pietà”

The figurine comes from an Orthodox church in Dubno, a village located near the Slovakian border, to the south-east of Muszyna. It is one of the few examples of folk Orthodox church sculptures in the collection of the Museum in Nowy Sącz. It is worth noting that it was made by a highly skilled folk artist.

Icon “St. Demetrios the Martyr”

This icon comes from an Orthodox church in the village of Czarna in the Beskid Sądecki. It presents a whole-figure depiction of St. Dmitry, shown en face, with a cross in his right hand and with his left hand making a gesture of profession of the Christian faith. The saint is shown in ancient robes, without attributes of a soldier's profession. His name is inscribed above his head in the Cyrillic alphabet.

Icon “The Mother of God” (“Pokrow”)

The icon comes from an Orthodox church in Maciejowa, a village located between Nowy Sącz and Krynica. This type of presentation named Pokrov depicts the Mother of God, who is extending a veil over the world, which is hanging from her outstretched arms over figures clustered at her feet. Two legends are the sources of this theme.