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Piotr Lutyński, “Bird column”

The work The Bird Column was created in 2003 in the Bunkier Sztuki Gallery and functioned as an exhibition in the process. The titular Bird Column, called by Lutyński “an animated sculpture” and “a large nest full of birds”, took the form of an installation: it was a developed construction, inside which there were paintings and objects made of wood and the birds, whose singing was heard throughout the Gallery from microphones placed nearby. In the next room, there was a goat with its kids. The whole exhibition was accompanied by texts referring to the teachings of St Francis of Assisi, the patron of animals, ornithologists, and bird breeders.

Urban Bell

In the upper part of the bell resonator is a date, “1382”, written in Roman numerals, which helped identify the date of the casting of the bell. It is also decorated with ornamentation. In the middle of the resonator is a frieze decorated with a curved line. Above it there are three plaques depicting the crucifixion scene placed at equal intervals.

“Polish” violin

The so-called “Polish” violin. Its original bow has not survived. The violin was made by Antoni Hybel from Ropa, a village situated close to Gorlice. The then press wrote about the instrument in 1925: “because of this invention, a complete reform of the structure of a violin took place.

Bow harp

Between 1882 and 1885 (although Poland did not exist on world maps), the first Polish Research Expedition to Africa was conducted. It was the first Polish research project to ever have been run in Africa. The exhibition was curated by the exhibition originator Stefan Szolc-Rogoziński.

Radio Elektrit Majestic (serial number 7578)

The Majestic radio receiver is an example of the production of one of the largest pre-war Polish radio companies — Towarzystwo Radiotechniczne Elektrit. This model was awarded the gold medal at the Radio Exhibition in Paris in 1936. Little wonder that a press advertisement from the 1930s described it as “the receiver for the most demanding”.

Philips 7-39 radio (serial number 1549)

This 7–39 radio set was produced by Polskie Zakłady Philips in the penultimate season of its production (1938/39) that was interrupted by the outbreak of World War II. Polskie Zakłady Philips was the largest radio manufacturing plant in Poland between World War I and World War II. It was established by a Dutch company of Philips in 1922 as Polsko–Holenderska Fabryka Lampek Elektrycznych S.A. (The Polish-Dutch Plant of Electric Lamps). It was renamed to Philips in 1928.

The Marconi radio set — 4-LS/I model (serial number 7163)

The Marconi radio set is a high quality luxury battery-operated radio set produced by Polskie Zakłady Marconi S.A. This Warsaw branch of the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company Ltd. London, the company established by the undisputed inventor of radiophony, Guglielmo Marconi, was established in 1928.

Polyphon

The presented exhibit is a musical instrument in the form of a music box made of wood. It is carved and has a glazed door. Inside the box is a playing mechanism with a metal disc.

Zither

Coming probably from Turkey, a beautifully decorated zither from the turn of the 19th century; artistic handwork. A bottom board of a sound box is made of a coniferous tree wood, glued together out of three parts, painted dark brown. Veneered sides, the top part of the sound box from the edge to the tailpiece is covered with parchment leather; the string nodes are made of bone.

“Dancing Satyr” – a plaster cast of an antique sculpture

The plaster cast, located in the corridor of the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków, represents a dancing satyr, playing on small plates similar to castanets and tapping out a rhythm on the scabellum (Gr. κρουπέζιον, pronunciation: krupézion, Latin scabellum): a type of percussive instrument in the form of a sandal made of wood with a double, movable sole fitted with small plates.

Under Window Tapestry with the figures playing the shells

It belongs to a series of fourteen tapestries designed to be hung under window sills. Most of them were damaged. After they had been taken to Russia in 1795, they were cut and sewn together to form semi-circular over-window or over-door tapestries. Upon their recovery from the Soviet Union in 1922, they were unstitched and put back together to reconstruct their original appearance. In the middle of the horizontal frieze, there is a metal vase supported on lion paws, filled with fruit and leaves. A huge eggplant and zucchini spill out of the vase. On both its sides, on a frame linking all the elements, two putti are perched, one of them with a bow and a quiver.

Under-Window Tapestry with Music-Making Figures

On the central axis of the tapestry, there is a large vase with fruit and flowers entwined with snakes, which support it. On either side of the vase, a putto is cradled in the framework of decorative strips. Each is props himself up with one hand on the frame and the other on the body of a snakes. In the corners of the tapestry, two musicians are depicted – an older bearded man playing the hurdy-gurdy and a young blonde woman holding a drum.

Tube gramophone

The mechanism of the gramophone is placed in a box made of oak wood in a natural colour. The casing is modestly decorated with simple mills, the front wall bears a metal brass secession plate depicting the muse, Erato.

Sculpture “Dance” by Maria Jarema

Maria Jarema — born in an artistic family, the daughter of a Lviv pianist — explored the problem of dynamics, rhythm, and the musicality of a work of art both in paintings and in sculptures throughout her whole artistically devoted life.

Hurdy-gurdy from Łękawka

Hurdy-gurdy was an instrument known across Europe whose history dates back to the Medieval period. In the Polish territories, as early as the beginning of the 20th century, the tradition of playing this instrument was in decline. A hurdy-gurdy was one of the instruments used to perform church, court and folk music. Hurdy-gurdy performances accompanied dances and songs.

Clavichord

We do not know much about this exhibit. It is a typical clavichord which — as a separate musical instrument — appeared in the 14th century. The use of clavichords spread in the 1st half of the 16th century. The one from the collection of the Museum of Ziemia Biecka came from the 18th century, from the time when the clavichord reached its final shape; among other features, it was equipped with legs.

Sculpture “Piper playing at the shrine” of Stanisław Wójcik

Intimate conversation One of the major institutions in Zakopane was the School of Wood Industry. It was founded upon the initiative of the Tatra Society in 1876 as a wood carving school “to support the poor highland population and local industry”, over time it became an important point on the cultural map of Zakopane because it educated many artists who made great contributions to its art.

Hurdy gurdy

A string and keyboard musical instrument. A rectangular box with keys and the complete playing mechanism is placed on the upper board. The shape of the instrument is similar to a violin. The upper board is made of coniferous wood, the bottom of beech wood.

“Heligonka” folk accordion

A heligonka is a folk variation of the accordion. The instrument was first mentioned in the eighteenth century, when—in 1829—the organ and piano master, Cyril Demain, was granted a patent for the manufacture of heligonkas in Vienna. Soon, their serial production had begun...

Mikiphone pocket phonograph

The phonograph has a spring drive mechanism and is designed to play discs that have a diameter of 10 to 25 cm at 33 rpm. It is sometimes described as the walkman of the Victorian era and the great-grandfather of the iPod. It is an example of one of the first pocket-size and movable devices for playing music.