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Krokus enlarger

In 1954, with the launch of production of a twin-lens reflex camera Start, the production of photo processing accessories commenced in the Warsaw Photo-Optical Works. One such device was an enlarger named Krokus. This name was given to subsequent models of enlargers produced until the 1990s. Enlargers of this family bore additional digital marking, e.g. Krokus 3, 4 N Color, 44, 69S, and were produced for various negative formats. Enlargers from Warsaw Photo-Optical Works satisfied the needs of amateur photographers in Poland and many other countries, being a perfect export product for years.

Osa M50 scooter

Osa M50 oraz M52 to jedyne w historii polskiej motoryzacji seryjnie produkowane skutery. Prace nad stworzeniem polskiego skutera były prowadzone w Dziale Postępu i Sportu Warszawskiej Fabryki Motocykli przez inżynierów Krzysztofa Bruna, Jerzego Jankowskiego i Tadeusza Mathia już od 1951 roku.

“Magic Lantern” — slide projector from Austro-Hungary

“Magic Lantern” – a projector for large-format transparencies framed in glass frames with a maximum format of 15 x 15 cm. The projector was produced over the years 1890–1918 by an unknown manufacturer in Austro-Hungary. Magic lanterns were devices known since the Renaissance times, used for projecting pictures painted on glass onto the screen. Later, they began to be used for displaying photographic images – diapositives.

Detective camera by V. Bischoff Company

The detective camera was produced around 1890 by V. Bischoff from Munich (Germany). It is a very rare camera, with a hand-held 9x12 cm disc changer, that allows you to quickly take 12 photos.

Ensign Midget (model 55) — a miniature camera

Ensign Midget Model 55 — a miniature camera designed to take the Ensign E 10 type of film and deliver photographs in the 3.5 x 4.5 cm format. The camera was manufactured between 1934 and 1940 by a London-based company called Houghton (UK).

Atelier camera, R.A. Goldmann Company

This is an atelier camera made between 1890 and 1900 at the R.A. Goldmann company in Vienna. It has been meticulously manufactured and records photos on “dry” glass plates with a maximum format of 18 x 24 cm. It is equipped with a portrait lens, produced in 1897 by Voigtländer & Sohn from Braunschweig (Germany).

Atelier camera produced in Germany

This is an atelier camera for “dry” glass plates with a maximum format of 18 x 24 cm, produced in the 1880s by an unknown manufacturer in Germany. The lens is from a later date (an 1890–1920 Aristostigmat 7 6.5/360), produced by Meyer...

Stereoscopic camera by Heinrich Ernemann A.G. Company

This is a stereoscopic camera with a folding (scissor) structure for cut films, with a 5.5 x 12.5 cm format. The camera is equipped with two lenses: the Doppel Anastigmat DAGOR III 6.8/80, by CP Goerz of Berlin. The camera for stereoscopic photos was made between 1905 and 1910...

Duchessa Stereo — stereoscopic camera by Contessa Nettel A.G. Company

This is a foldable stereoscopic camera for glass discs, with a 4.5 x 10.7 cm format. The camera is equipped with two lenses — Tessar 1: 4.5 f = 6.5 cm—by Carl Zeiss from Jena. It took pictures (stereo-pair) on a 4.5 x 10.7 cm....

Stereoscope viewer from Austro-Hungary

The stereoscopic viewer of Brewster’s system for stereoscopic photos (slides), in the single 7 x 7 cm image format, was manufactured in Austria-Hungary in the early twentieth century...

The “Mercury” Stereoscope viewer by Underwood & Underwood

The “Mercury” Stereoscope is a Holmes system stereoscopic viewer for stereoscopic photographs, with a single 7 x 7 cm image, produced in 1900–1920 by Underwood & Underwood from New York (USA). One of the simplest designs of stereoscopic viewers was the “open” viewer system, invented by Oliver Wendell Holmes in 1861. This was an extremely simple design, equipped with an eyepiece with lenses, including an appropriately curved wooden or metal sun visor. The Underwood & Underwood Company sold millions of stereoscopic photos, thanks to this very cheap production model of the viewer.

Coronet Midget — minature camera by Coronet Camera Company

The Coronet Midget is a miniature 16 mm film camera, with frame format of 13 x 18 cm, produced in 1935 by the Coronet Camera Company from Birmingham (Great Britain). The camera is equipped with a Taylor Hobson lens...

Primar Reflex camera

The Primar Reflex is a single-lens reflex camera for film and glass plates, in the format of 9 x 12 cm, produced in the years 1900–1918 by Curt Bentzin from Gőrlitz (Germany). The camera is equipped with a Carl Zeiss Jena Triotar 3.5 / 180 lens. The large body of the camera...

Ernoflex — camera by Heinrich Ernemann A.G. Company

The Ernoflex (Model II) is a single-lens reflex camera with a folding structure, for cut film and glass discs, with a 9 x 12 cm format, produced in 1910–1920, by the company Heinrich Ernemann AG from Dresden (Germany). The camera body is double-folded, made entirely of metal, and covered with black leather with a decorative texture.

Pathé Baby film projector

Pathé Baby (COQ D'OR) — is an amateur cinematographic projector for a 9.5 mm film strip, produced in 1937–1940 by the Pathé Frères works in Paris. Founded in 1896, Société Pathé Frères...

Ring — film projector produced in Germany

The Ring is an amateur cinematographic projector for 35 mm wide tape, made in 1900–1919 in Germany (Bavaria). The construction of the cinematograph constructed by the Lumière brothers in 1895 and the rapid development of film art ...

“Magic Lantern” — slide projector by ICA

“The magic lantern” is a slide projector made on 8 x 8 cm diaphragm glass plates, produced by the ICA company from Dresden, in the years 1909–1926. Established in 1909 from the merger of several Dresden photographic equipment factories, the large ICA (Internationale...

Folding TRIX 185 camera

The Trix 185 camera was manufactured at the beginning of the 20th century, during the period 1902–1920, by the German company ICA (Internationale Camera Aktiengesselschaft). It was Włodzimierz Puchalski’s second camera and comes from a period when arduous work with the film and photo camera brought the young artist his first successes.

Folding camera from 19th/20th century

Undoubtedly, Włodzimierz Puchalski’s struggles with photography were initiated by his father, Władysław, and his older brother, Roman. This mahogany folding camera was the first one that Włodzimierz Puchalski used. He got it from his grandfather, Hieronim Sykora, and as a 13-year-old boy he discovered a passion for photography.

Polyphon

The presented exhibit is a musical instrument in the form of a music box made of wood. It is carved and has a glazed door. Inside the box is a playing mechanism with a metal disc.