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Hoard from Nowa Huta — Pleszów

It was discovered in August 1961 in the settlement of Pleszów. A part of the deposit was put in a clay pot with a volume of about 2 litres. The remaining part was scattered across a fairly large space. The treasure contains silver objects: coins and their fragments — 608 items, 129 fragments of ornaments, 341 cast pieces of silver and 8 pieces of lead. The treasure was hidden after 1037 and it weighs 2 532 g.

Cash register with a counting machine

A heavy, massive cash register for counting decorated with garlands and floral motives is an extremely valuable exhibit, considering its origin. The National Cash Register company from Dayton (in Ohio State) specialised in the production of counting machines, and gained a monopoly in this field within the territory of the United States in the late 19th and early 20th century.

Commemorative box with coins and a banknote from the times of the November Uprising of 1831

At the time of the November Uprising, which broke out in Warsaw in 1830 to oppose Tsarist Russia, the National Government ordered a series of new coins to be made including a 3 copper groschen, a 10 coin groschen, silver two- and five-zloty coins and gold Dutch ducats.

Glass necessity money

The glass necessity money issued by Galicyjskie Akcyjne Zakłady Górnicze [Galician Mining Stock Company] in Siersza. The reverse is smooth; there is a convex inscription on the obverse: “1 KGR MIESA WOLÓWEGO Z. S.” [“1 KG OF BEEF Z. S.”], denoting the value of the blue coin back then.

Glass feudal coin

A bright green coin made of glass which constituted as a substitute for legal tender within the territory of the dominion of the Koryciński family of the Topór [Axe] coat of arms from Jodłowa. Inside a glass disc there was the Koryciński coat of arms in the shape of an embossed axe; above it there is a crown with nine tops.

Hoard from Witów

A treasure of four gold Roman coins from the 5th century AD was found in Witów. It contains three solidi of Emperor Theodosius II (402–450) and one solidus of Emperor Valentinian II (424–455). The first group of coins presents a bust in an armour on the obverse. The name of the emperor is inscribed on the rim — DN THEODOSI-VS P.F. AVG.

Strongbox

A safe for storing the salt company’s accounting documents is the heaviest and largest exhibit at the Wieliczka Salt Works Castle and one of its few original items that has been preserved to our times. It was purchased by the Wieliczka Salt Mine Board in January of 1910 in Lviv. The well-known manufacturer put the labels with its name on the safe’s top and close to the internal fixing of the lock: “C. K. Uprzywilejowana pierwsza krajowa Fabryka Kas Ogniotrwałych W. Kosiba & W. Chudzikowski Lwów” (The First Imperial and Royal Authorised National Factory of Fireproof Strongboxes W. Kosiba & W. Chudzikowski, Lviv).

Mirosław Bałka, “7+1”

The sculpture 7+1 consists of salt cylinders sitting in concrete containers. The last of those turns independently. The cylinders were made of salt from the Kłodawa salt mine, noted for its brownish impurities, which give each cylinder its individual appearance.

Greek ostrakon – receipt of payment of the Jewish tax

In AD 72, after suppressing the Jewish uprising in Palestine, the Romans levied a Jewish tax (ioudaikon telesma) on all Jews living in the Roman Empire. It exceeded 8 drachmas and was a considerable burden on the mostly poor residents of the Jewish district in Apollinopolis Magna. This document is a receipt for only part of the yearly burden.

Greek ostrakon – receipt of payment of “laografia”

Receipt of payment of laografia (head tax). In Roman times, Jews inhabited district IV in Apollinopolis Magna. The regular head tax in the 1st-2nd century was 16 drachmas a year. Receipt for payment of 8 drachmas (as in this document) or 4 drachmas are proof of the tax having been paid in installments.

Greek ostrakon

An ostracon from the collection of the Field Museum No. 2 which was established thanks to the Independent Carpathian Rifle Brigade that fought in the Middle East during the World War II and reached Egypt where they managed to obtain museum exhibits.

Greek ostrakon – receipt of tax payment in cash

Receipt of tax payment in cash. Date: November 5, AD 108. “Bokchoris son of Iosepos, [as] payment of k... tax for the 12th year [of the reign] of Trajan, our lord. Year 12, Hathyr 9.” Commentary: Iosepos is a variant of the name of Josephus. The name of the tax is preserved but illegible.

Mining weight

A weight for the town mining scales, once standing on the market square in Olkusz. The ore and melted metal were weighed on it to calculate the tax due to the crown treasury.

Byzantine solidus

Solidus (Lat. solidus, i.e. solid) was a Roman gold coin introduced by Constantine the Great at the beginning of the 4th century and used as the main Byzantine trade coin. Coins with images of emperors were minted during their reign.

“Brunsviga 13” calculating machine

Brunsviga 13 is a manual mechanical calculating machine (arithmometer) with a 13-position counter. Arithmometers were patented in the 19th century in France and were designed to perform addition and subtraction, whereas multiplication and division could be conducted by several operations of adding and subtracting. They were driven manually (with a crank or a lever).