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Spoon rack

Spoon rack — a small narrow wooden shelf with holes for spoons, covered in the front with a decoratively carved board, used for storing spoons; hung on the wall of the room. It comes from Józef Lesiecki’s collection created in Zakopane in the years 1912–1914, and was transferred to the collections of the Tatra Museum in 1920.

Toiletries

The set of toilet accessories consists of: a folding razor, a brush, a folding knife, a spoon and two spatulas for applying creams.

Decorative travelling box

The decorative travelling box with a lock has the form of a chest and is made of wood, varnished in black. On the outside of the lid, there is a round plaque with a decorative border and no inscriptions.

A cologne bottle made of milk glass

Made of milk glass, the bottle in the form of a cylindrical decanter with a stopper is decorated with a floral ornamentation and a painted plate which reads “COLOGNE”.

Kraków’s bed

Kraków’s bed made from soft wood has signature 1 in the collection of the Seweryn Udziela Ethnographic Museum in Kraków. It was the first object, which started museum’s collection.

Zakopane style cupboard

Wojciech Brzega was a designer of furniture which can be found in the collection of the Pieniny Museum, and which was made in the Zakopane style at the request of Jan Wiktor, a writer. The most impressive exhibit is an oak sideboard. It is one of the elements of a full set of furniture in the Zakopane style which can be found in the Pieniny Museum.

Fan with a court scene

The fan is made of a hand-painted fabric. In the fan’s folds, richly decorated fields with various floral patterns featuring a palette of blues and pinks, coloured using paint gouache, arranged vertically, are clearly visible. Through the floral compositions, there diamond-shaped ornaments, sewn in using golden thread, with the addition of sequins and beads at the corners. Along the fan, runs a strip of alternating brown and azure-blue panels, with white and pink flowers running respectively, in various compositions.

Fan with a tortoiseshell holder

The fan is made of paper/leather, painted to show depictions of garden scenes in three separate fields. In the central, largest field, a scene containing a depiction of drinking tea in a garden has been painted. Two ladies are talking with an officer in a blue uniform at a set table. In the background, a garden wall and vegetation are visible.

Fan with a romantic scene

The fan is made of paper, with an ivory handle and ribbing. On the paper, there are scenes drawn using a visual technique, painted with gouache. The main scene on the fan shows a couple embracing on a bridge in an English garden. At the couple’s feet, a cupid is pointing to a rose. An expansive landscape including an aerial view, turning into an amply painted gold ornament featuring vegetal tendrils with purple flowers constitutes the scene’s background.

Marcin Maciejowski, “The Doctor Said…”

The works by Marcin Maciejowski reveal interest in the present and everyday life of a human being. His pictorial commentaries on reality are the result of insightful and multifaceted observation of Polish society. The artist analyses customs, explores stereotypes and cultural patterns. He deals with media topics, presenting figures known from the first pages of newspapers (politicians, journalists, celebrities), topics of sensational events, as well as social and economic problems. He devotes much attention to the social reception of art and the role of the artist.

Karolina Kowalska, “A window onto the winter”

The motifs of urban everyday life as an illusory sign of economic prosperity prevail in Karolina Kowalska’s works. Streets, blocks of flats, and office buildings appear next to intimate apartment interiors and impersonal infrastructure. The architectural and media indicators of capitalism determine the area of human activity, rendering the world of nature a luxurious addition. The artist manipulates their images, pushing them into everyday realities and, with a hint of irony, transforming them. Thus, her photographs, films, installations, and objects reveal in a nuanced, jocular manner, the influence of urban cityscape on individuals and relationships and propose slightly improved variants. The projects realized by the artists combine music, visual art, and text at times.

Zakopane style chair

On utility and artistic national duty... Apart from paintings and sculptures, the collections of the Art Division at the Tatra Museum also include a rich collection of furniture. Visitors pay the greatest attention to the ones in the Zakopane style. The permanent exhibition at the Museum of Zakopane Style in the Koliba villa features, among others, a desk and a chair designed by Wojciech Brzega.

Biedermeier style night chair

In the manor house from Droginia (moved to the Museum in Wygiełzów), in which the apartment interiors of a wealthy noble family were recreated, the more intimate side of life was also included. The bedroom, located in the alcove, equipped with 19th century furniture, also included a night-chair which served as a privy.

Cranked butter churn

In peasant farmhouses butter was usually made by whipping cream in wooden stave churns. However, this must have been an exhausting activity: hands fainted and the back numbed. Nonetheless, whoever has ever tried real cottage butter shall never regret the effort.

Device — coffee roaster

Only a few of those who have visited the museum in Kęty are able to determine what the presented object was designed for. It is similar in shape to tea brewers, which were popular until recently, but its considerable size excludes this function. The device dates back to the 2nd half of the 19th century...

Bottles for cologne

Three perfume bottles with labels of the Fryderyk Puls brand.

Orava pitcher

The presented object is a spherical pitcher with a short, narrow neck to which a convex handle is attached. Its lower edge reaches only down to the upper part of the body, without disturbing the graceful spherical shape. In this type of narrow-necked pitchers usually beverages like mead and wine were served. Upper Orava – in the part located on the Polish side – did not have its own pottery workshop, but it was easily supplied with these products at nearby fairs until World War I, mainly in Trzciana (Tyrstyna).

“Chypre” perfume bottles in a cardboard case

The cuboidal cardboard case is covered with imitation leather and comes with a lid. The size of the case is matched to three perfume bottles. The three bottles are shaped like cuboidal decanters, with stoppers made of colourless glass.

Perfume bottle with a coat of arms

The glass perfume bottle has a form similar to a cone. The wide bottom of the vessel’s body transitions to the narrow upper part in a straight line. Under the neck of the bottle, there is a wide bevelled strip of concavity.

Perfume bottle with a chain

The glass perfume bottle has the form of a high vial with a hexagonal cross-section and is made of azure solid-coloured glass. The walls of the bottle are decorated alternately with a white simplified rocaille motif on the background of azure glass or painted over in gold...