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Small vase “kantharos”

In the Korzec collection in Tarnów, which numbers 450 inventory items, a small vase of the kantharos type deserves special attention. Vases of this type served as decorations and were produced on the occasion of anniversaries or other events. The excellent quality of the product and the elegance of its form and decorations prove the high level of manufacturing quality in the 1st two decades of the 19th century. In Polish museum collections, a similar small vase can be found in the collection of the National Museum in Warsaw.

Vase with a dance circle motif

A vase with a flat bottom and a belly gradually widening upwards. Around the vessel a decorative ornament presenting a circle of dancing figures holding each other’s hands, also serving as a vase handle. The pottery and tile ware factory, J. Niedźwiecki and Co. in Dębniki, was also famous for the production of artistic faience in the years 1900–1910.

“Hydria” apothecary vase

A hydria type apothecary vase. Majolica. Savona (Italy). The 2nd half of the 17th century. Handles in the shape of (fantastic) animal heads on massive bent necks. In the front, at the bottom, there is a relief of a gargoyle. In its mouth there is an opening to pour out the content of the vase, plugged with a standard cork. There are smaller gargoyles without openings on the sides of the vessel, under the handles.

Porcelain salt cellar with a figure of black woman with a basket

This is a figurine-shaped porcelain salt shaker with a container for salt. A very decorative figure of black woman with a basket was created in the oldest European porcelain workshop in Meissen, near Dresden. It was made according to the model developed by Johann Friedrich Eberlein in 1741.

Chinese porcelain salt shaker

The presented salt shaker is an example of early white-blue pottery, which is decorated with cobalt blue. It is a rare form of Far Eastern porcelain imported to Europe. The object has come a long way to the collection of the Wieliczka Museum, because it was made in China during the Kangxi period (1662–1722).

Tiled stove, so-called amorial with coats of arms

The stove was manufactured in the maiolica factory in Nieborów, which was established in 1881 by Prince Michał Radziwiłł. It comes from the destroyed mansion in Krzyszkowice near Myślenice and it was renovated in 1977.

Tiled stove from manor house in Droginia

The tiled stove was moved to the Museum of the Vistula Ethnographic Park in Wygiełzów and the Lipowiec Castle as an element of the former furnishings of the manor house in Droginia. During the reconstruction it was located in the room constituting the museum exhibition where it performs a decorative function in the master’s room, although it used to be a source of heat in the Droginia manor where the Bzowski family lived for generations.

Red-figure pelike

The clay red-figure vessel comes from Kerch — a Greek colony situated on the Black Sea. It was made in the so-called Kerch style and is dated back to the 4th century BC. The edge of the vessel is trimmed with an ornament of an egg-and-dart encircling the figural scene. On the one side there is Arimaspian fighting with a gryphon. The warrior is dressed in a tunic and trousers — anaxyrides.

Zoomorphic vessel (Chimú culture)

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger from 1876. It has two circular bellies and two beaks: one in the shape of a bird’s head, the other one tall and straight, both conjoined with a curved handle. On the belly, there are panels with straps of...

Zoomorphic vessel (Chancay Culture)

The vessel comes from the 1876 Peruvian collection of Władysław Kluger. The hollow, zoomorphic figurine most likely represents a llama. It was made of a ceramic material, then coated with a light-coloured slip and white paint, which is most noticeable on the muzzle of the animal.

A vessel with an anthropomorphic bust on the cast

The exhibit comes from the 1876 Peruvian collection of Władysław Kluger and was created during the period of Chimú culture. The vessel consists of two separate pieces, whose bodies were conjoined with a wide tunnel. They also feature a common handle connecting their necks.

Vessel with an artistic representation of symplegma

A man and a woman in an erotic scene are shown on the chest which imitates a bed. Both figures are naked, with their long hair reaching down to their shoulders with strongly marked eyes, noses and half-open mouths. The stirrup-shaped ear connects the back of the man with the side-surface of the bed, which is covered with a geometric ornament.

Zoomorphic vessel

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger, it is from 1876. It has the shape of the lama head with wide outflow.

Frog-shaped vessel

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger, it is from 1876. Anatomical details of the frog and decorations made ​​in the form of zigzags are painted with red paint around the vessel.

Anthropomorphic vessel

The vessel from Władysław Kluger’s collection comes from Peru, from the pre-Columbian period. The specimen was made of clay by shaped in a mould. Some elements were manually modelled (nose, ears, hands), then the vessel was fired to a bright red color. The surface is matt.

Vessel in the shape of a warrior’s head

The vessel comes from the collection of Władysław Kluger from 1876. It has the shape of a warrior’s head with a band. On its sides there are large protruding ears with earrings. The eyes of the warrior are almond-like, with slightly hooded eyelids. The face is of a geometrised shape.

A vessel rolled on a potter’s wheel

A vessel thrown on a potter’s wheel with a profiled, conical neck, of light grey colour, comes from the late Roman imperial period, i.e. 3rd–4th century AD. It was discovered at the multicultural site no. 1 in Witów.

“Terra sigillata” vessel

The terra sigillata vessel in the form of a bowl on a foot comes from the cremation tomb accidentally discovered in Lisów (Opatów district). The vessel was imported from a province of the Roman Empire. The form of the vessel is typical of the pottery workshop in Rheinzabern (south-western Germany), the largest centre producing vessels of this type in the northern provinces of the Roman Empire (Germania Superior), operating in 190–220. The vessel was made of clay, sealed in the matrix with a negative decoration, and subsequently baked in a furnace in the pottery workshop of Primitivus I.

A spherical vessel with a reclining figure on the spout

The object comes from Władysław Kluger’s 1876 Peruvian collection. It is an oval vessel whose upper part (spout) is formed into an anthropomorphic shape.

Clay vessel from Bilche Zolote

The vessel is part of the rich collection of monuments from Bilcze Złote, from the Werteba Cave. The objects come from excavations, conducted with breaks from 1876 to 1907, by Adam Honory Kirkor, Gotfryd Ossowski, and Włodzimierz Dematrykiewicz. The collections of Prince Leon and Teresa Sapieh were handed over by agreement in 1904 to the Museum of Skills Academy in Kraków.