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The “Christ on the Cross” icon

Helena Dąbczańska is a famous Lviv collector of incunabula, engravings, books, drawings, fabrics and furniture; the owner of a private museum organized in her own villa and the hostess on artistic Sunday mornings for representatives of the Lviv elite at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Esther’s scroll in a cover

Megilla it's a parchment scroll with a Hebrew manuscript of the Book. It was designed for individual reading at home and in a synagogue in the period of the early spring holiday of Purim.

Icon “Our Lady Hodegetria surrounded by prophets and saints”

This icon is the oldest in the collection of Nowy Sącz. The exhibit was added to the collection in 1977, after a sale offer was made by people living in Nowa Wieś, on a farm which was assigned to Polish settlers after the deportation of the Lemkos in 1947.

Hanukkah lamp

Chanukija is an oil lamp designed for lighting symbolical lights to commemorate the renewal of the cult in the Temple of Jerusalem after the victorious Maccabean Revolt in 165 BC.

“Triptych of Saint Mary Magdalene” from Moszczenica Niżna near Stary Sącz

The painting, Triptych of Saint Mary Magdalene, from Moszczenica Niżna near Stary Sącz is preserved in a rare state of completeness. The essence of the retable can be investigated based on this example. At the end of the 15th century, the retable constituted an expanded structure composed of an immovable main panel, the movable wings attached to it; a predella, which served as a basis for the wings, the main panel, and a finial.

Icon “St. Nicholas”

St. Nicholas is one of the most popular saints in Rus and Greece. He was the bishop of Myra in Asia Minor. His iconic representation was shaped at the beginning of the second millennium. The complex series which illustrate his life come from the 12th century. In panel painting, the story of his life was presented in the strip surrounding the main field of the painting, containing several smaller paintings. The central figure of St. Nicholas was presented as an old man, in bishop’s attire, in the half-figure or full-figure portrait depiction.

Sculpture “Crucified Christ” from 14th century

The sculpture depicts the Crucified Christ. The Saviour has dark hair falling on his shoulders, a short beard and moustache. The figure’s hands were completely destroyed.

Shrine with a scene of the Scourging of Christ

Shrine of the cabinet type, intended for hanging, with three figures presented in the scene of the Scourging of Christ. The shrine comes from the Podhale region but we do not know the name of its creator, the time of production and its exact place of origin. It was bought by Maria and Bronisław Dembowski for their collection during the years 1887-1893.

Feretory depicting St. Anne and Christ crowned

The monument dates back to the1st half of the 18th century and comes from a wooden church in Szczawnica, which was built in 1550 and demolished in 1894. The procession float which can be found in the collection of the Pieniny Museum is placed on a base in the shape of an elongated rectangle, wound around with a plait.

Pulpit with images of the Holy Fathers of the Church

The exhibit comes from an Orthodox church in the village of Królowa Ruska (after the displacement of the Lemkos, it was named Królowa Górna). Originally, the pulpit consisted of three parts: a canopy with an image of the Holy Spirit, a basket and a casing of the stairs with a balustrade in the form of a rhomboid board, with a painted representation of a two-horse cart with the prophet Elijah rising to the sky on a fiery cloud.

Painting “Adoration of the Child” by Lorenzo Lotto

A joyful scene of the adoration of the Child (with saints: John the Baptist, Francis of Assisi, Joseph and Catherine of Alexandria) is a hidden allusion to Christ’s future fate. The Child’s deep sleep may be associated with the Redeemer’s martyr death through ancient references — Sleep (Hypnos) in the Greek mythology is the brother of Death (Thanatos).

Etrog tin

An etrog tin in the shape of a pomegranate with three leaves, oxidised and open in the middle. The exhibit presumably belonged to rich Jews, as only they could afford such a decorated, silver container, used to carry the etrog to a synagogue on the holiday of Sukkot.

Cup from Michael Wissmar workshop

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Chalice and paten

The chalice was made in a Roman workshop around 1360. It is set on a ten-leaved foot base with a pedestal, decorated with a geometric decoration strip. The chalice foot is covered with a smooth coat, with an applied medallion containing an engraved coat of arms surrounded by laurel leaves in the field and on the opposite side of the coat with an enamelled cameo showing a Crucifixion Group. The upper base is finished with a ring with a strip of geometric decoration analogous to the base.

The figurine of St. Kinga by Józef Janos

The sculpture was made by the folk artist Józef Janos from Dębno Podhalańskie, a known holy-image maker, author of numerous roadside shrines and church figures.

Hanukkah lamp

The eight-branched candelabrum made in honour of the Hanukkah festival – the victorious Maccabean Revolt. The festival – recorded in the books of Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) – is over 2,000 years old.

Chasuble of the Lubomirski Foundation

A white chasuble with an embroidered purple column. The type of embroidery dates this back to around 1600. It was made, among the others, with a gold and silver thread and stitches partially on an underlay of silk fabric with a lancé of gold wire. At the bottom of the vestment, the Lubomirski-Szreniawa coat of arms was gently but legibly incorporated into the chasuble column. The jacquard side fabric with a damask effect is from the 19th century.

Long stole of a late Renaissance set of vestments

The stole is part of the liturgical vestment worn during the liturgy of many Christian Churches. This long strip of fabric is placed around the priest’s neck, and its ends fall freely on the chest (in the case of a deacon it is put on diagonally: from the left shoulder to the right side). A stole has been used since the beginning of the Middle Ages as an element included in the set of vestments. It symbolizes the priesthood as God’s yoke.

Short stole of a late Renaissance set of vestments

The short stole, like the longer stole from the same set of vestments, was made of red silk satin with a floral pattern brocaded with a gold thread. The end is trimmed with a gold 1.2 cm wide border (galloon) with a geometric pattern. It was decorated with crosses made of gold border at the ends and in the central part. In addition, in the 20th century, a collar made of a piece of lace was sewn in the middle.

Dalmatic of a late Renaissance set of vestments

The dalmatic was worn by the Greeks and Romans as a loose garment extended to the feet worn by lay people with long, wide sleeves and two vertical purple stripes, also known as clavi. In the 2nd century, it was adopted in Western Europe through Byzantium in today’s Dalmatia during the Merovingian and Carolingian period. The dalmatic has been functioning as a liturgical vestment since the 5th century, when it disappeared from lay people’s clothing.