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Wooden sculpture “Highlander”

Full wooden sculpture depicting a man’s figure dressed in a folk outfit similar to outfits worn by Podhale highlanders in the 2nd half of the 19th century. It was purchased for the Tatra Museum’s collection in the 1990s. There is no information about its author, place, or time of completion.

Womens’s corset for Kraków costume

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Women’s shoes from Mników

Boots featuring multiple folds at ankle height, which is a characteristic feature of women’s shoes made in the village of Mników near Kraków at the turn of the 19th and 20th century.

Women’s outfit lendian

Kęty and its surrounding areas had been inhabited by the Lendians for centuries. Female costume is one of the few examples of Lendian culture which have survived to the present day, n examples of which are presented at the museum in Kęty. Single examples of such costumes could still be seen on the streets of Kęty in the 1970s.

Women’s folk — the Szczawnica highlanders

Today’s female folk costume of the Szczawnica highlanders consists of a corset made of black velvet with large floral patterns embroidered with silk threads on the back and the front, which is put on a white shirt, a skirt from green tybet fabric printed in large red flowers, an embroidered tulle apron and kierpce (hard-soled leather moccasins) put on white socks. In the past married women covered their heads with coifs and later with scarves. In the winter they wore cloth slippers and long sheepskin coats with sleeves.

Women's shoes with uppers from Mników

Women's calf-length boots made from black leather from the Krakow costume are an example of Hungarian style boots. These are the oldest type of boots, which were characterised by stitching two pieces of leather together on the sides. The upper layers of the boots are stiffened at the top, and in the lower part the skin is characteristically concertinaed (“bellows”).

Women's shoes hungarian style for Kraków costume

A pair of women's boots in a Hungarian style for the Kraków costume, made of black tanned leather, stiffened inside with pale cow skin. These boots have two-piece uppers stitched on the sides and stiffened at the top; in the lower part, at the ankles, the skin is characteristically concertinaed (“bellows”).

Women's shirt for Bronowice costume

A women's blouse for the Kraków costume made of white cotton, decorated with handmade embroidery white, hole and satin stitch. Cut with yoke, without a collar. In the middle of the front, a slit about 27 cm long, fastened under the neck with a button. Long sleeves, gathered at the top, finished with embroidered cuffs.

Women's cropped jacket

A few kinds of cropped jackets were used around Kraków, though the most popular and liked ones were those worn by Kraków women in the Young Poland time. Cropped jackets emerged as a popular piece of women's attire in the 1960s and 1970s, though their history dates back to as far as the 19th century.

Woman’s fan

The fan, originally designed as a cooling device, was elevated in modern times to a symbol of dignity. Over time, it became a very fashionable element of female attire. On the other hand, fan gestures became a conventional code used by men and women to communicate and flirt at the court.

Woman’s dress from Sudan

This women’s outfit from Sudan is probably dated to the 19th century. It is made of red silk embroidered with gold and silver threads and trimmed with a lace ribbon. The robe is 109 cm long, and measures 109 cm at its widest.

White woollen apron

An apron to match the Kraków costume made of two gores of white thin woollen fabric with motifs of green twigs, roses and other pink and red flowers, and blue and pink tiny flowers and buds printed over it.

White sukmana coat — Bronowice costume

A men's sukmana coat with a mandarin collar, made of white cloth. The sleeves are finished with small trapezoid lapels, with two oblique pocket holes on the front, fastened with a brass hook and eye. The collar, sleeve lapels, and a slit on the front are lined with red cloth; the edges are finished with a red trim. The sukmana coat is adorned with amaranthine silk cord appliqués and similar motifs of thread bundles embroidered with silken threads.

White sukmana coat — “chrzanówka”

The sukmana coat, formerly known as an outer garment, was commonly worn on Sundays and festivals by the inhabitants of Kraków villages. It was made of white cloth formerly manufactured, for example, by drapers from Chrzanów (even in the early 20th century, about a dozen families living in Chrzanów were still involved in this craft). Cloth made of spun wool was purchased from merchants from Biała. Depending on the recipient, tailors used a various finish of sukmana coats.

White cucha jacket

White cucha jacket, in local dialect: cucha bioła — a kind of traditional outer clothing worn by men in Podhale. The cucha jacket on display constituted an element of the Sunday best outfit. It was sewn and most likely decorated in 1966 by Czesław Styrczula-Maśniak, a well-known folk tailor from Dzianisz. A year later it was purchased for the collections of the Dr. Tytus Chałubiński Tatra Museum in Zakopane.

Wedding scarf from Raciborowice

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Wedding scarf from Pogórze

In the past wedded women were not supposed to show themselves with an uncovered head. They usually wore small percale scarves or flowery scarves made of tybet fabric (Polish fabric made of Tibetan sheep wool); while on holidays and during various ceremonies, they made a wedding headscarf from a tulle scarf. Such a wedding scarf was worn by a bride during the unveiling and capping ceremony, which was an important moment at every wedding.

Wedding scarf for Kraków costume

A White headscarf tied into a bonnet for the Kraków costume, decorated with flat and punch embroidery. Two sides of the scarf are cut in an openwork teeth style with small holes, the other two sides are more richly decorated. Above the openwork teeth there is a frieze composed of hemstitched and punched cone motifs. Moreover, in the spaces between the cones, there are six-petal punched flowers and embroidered small branches with leaves.

Wedding scarf

The head scarf was the most important and most valuable covering of married women; it was an indispensable element of women’s folk costume in Kraków. It was put on women for the first time during the traditional wedding ceremony called Oczepiny, to indicate the change in her marital status. Scarves were worn by married women throughout their entire future life.

Wedding kimono “uchikake” with a motif of cranes in flight

The level of a kimono's formality is determined by the type, design and colour of its fabric, as well as the adjustment necessary for the occasion the kimono is intended for. At present, most women wear kimonos when practising traditional Japanese arts such as the ikebana and the tea ceremony, or during important family meetings. One such event is a Japanese wedding of Shinto rite. One of the kimonos included in the set of kimonos worn by the bride on that day is a red outer kimono uchikake.