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Long stole of a late Renaissance set of vestments

The stole is part of the liturgical vestment worn during the liturgy of many Christian Churches. This long strip of fabric is placed around the priest’s neck, and its ends fall freely on the chest (in the case of a deacon it is put on diagonally: from the left shoulder to the right side). A stole has been used since the beginning of the Middle Ages as an element included in the set of vestments. It symbolizes the priesthood as God’s yoke.

Short stole of a late Renaissance set of vestments

The short stole, like the longer stole from the same set of vestments, was made of red silk satin with a floral pattern brocaded with a gold thread. The end is trimmed with a gold 1.2 cm wide border (galloon) with a geometric pattern. It was decorated with crosses made of gold border at the ends and in the central part. In addition, in the 20th century, a collar made of a piece of lace was sewn in the middle.

Dalmatic of a late Renaissance set of vestments

The dalmatic was worn by the Greeks and Romans as a loose garment extended to the feet worn by lay people with long, wide sleeves and two vertical purple stripes, also known as clavi. In the 2nd century, it was adopted in Western Europe through Byzantium in today’s Dalmatia during the Merovingian and Carolingian period. The dalmatic has been functioning as a liturgical vestment since the 5th century, when it disappeared from lay people’s clothing.

Chasuble of a late Renaissance set of vestments

The chasuble evolved from a Roman outer garment, which was a kind of sleeveless coat with only one small hole for the head. The chasuble was worn during all priestly acts. Beginning in the 13th century, the chasuble began to be shortened on the sides, so that it would not constrict hand movement, until the 17th century, when only two sheets of fabric remained: front and back. At the same time, the chasuble came to be decorated with increasingly rich embroidery.

Cope of late Renaissance set of vestments

A cope is a long and wide cloak, worn over shoulders and fastened on the chest during the Liturgy of the Hours, the celebration of the sacraments outside the Holy Mass, and the exposition of the Blessed Sacrament. The only ones authorized to wear it are bishops, presbyters, and deacons who received permission from the Holy See.

Russian headdress piece – a prop from the School of Fine Arts

A headdress piece stiffened with wires, made of strips forming a diagonal chequered pattern. It is embroidered with imitation pearls and laced with metal threads, forming a convex plant ornament. The crown is placed at the back. The whole piece was covered with fabric, and straps were sewn into it at the head for fastening. The object was used as a prop in the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków.

Fragment of a decorative fabric – a prop from the School of Fine Arts

A fragment of decorative fabric was used as a prop in the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków – at the school of historical painting of Jan Matejko.

Epaulettes – props from the School of Fine Arts

The presented epaulettes were used as props at the Matejko school of historical painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków.

Scale helmet

A helmet created from overlapping circular scales ornamented with rosettes, riveted down to a leather base. On the top, there is a multi-leaf medallion topped with a high tip. The hatband consisting of a few belts of metal sheet is ornamented with a turban made of raspberry-coloured silk and trimmed with golden braid.

Chasuble of Wadowice

A chasuble in a dark red colour with the addition of elements in turquoise and blue with a motif of a six-leaf rose in a net arrangement and pomegranates in the middle. There are two columns (initially a cross-shaped orphrey) sewed on brocade, laced with colourful silk as well as silver and gold threads with flat and satin stitches.