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White sukmana coat — “chrzanówka”

The sukmana coat, formerly known as an outer garment, was commonly worn on Sundays and festivals by the inhabitants of Kraków villages. It was made of white cloth formerly manufactured, for example, by drapers from Chrzanów (even in the early 20th century, about a dozen families living in Chrzanów were still involved in this craft). Cloth made of spun wool was purchased from merchants from Biała. Depending on the recipient, tailors used a various finish of sukmana coats.

Tadeusz Kościuszko’s sukmana coat

The homespun sukmana coat is traditionally believed to belong to Tadeusz Kościuszko, sewn of ashen cloth, with long sleeves lined at the end with red fabric, widening from the waist down. The upright collar is sewn with a red fabric inset. On the collar, along the hook-and-eye clasp, at the waist and the coat tail cut, there are brown braids of woollen string. At the bottom of the right coat tail there are four horizontal zones of blue and yellow embroidered with wool.

White sukmana coat — Bronowice costume

A men's sukmana coat with a mandarin collar, made of white cloth. The sleeves are finished with small trapezoid lapels, with two oblique pocket holes on the front, fastened with a brass hook and eye. The collar, sleeve lapels, and a slit on the front are lined with red cloth; the edges are finished with a red trim. The sukmana coat is adorned with amaranthine silk cord appliqués and similar motifs of thread bundles embroidered with silken threads.

Tafetta skirt

Skirt of silk taffeta brocaded with a silk thread – an element of a woman's festive dress from the Podhale region. The skirt comes from Zakopane or its vicinity. Its fabric dates back to the second half of the 18th century. The time when the skirt was made and the period of its use are unknown.

“Berloce” straw shoes

Presented exhibit does not resemble winter boots. It was weaved from straw and intricately bound with string. Shape presented berlocy associated rather with straw baskets that can be purchased at the folk fairs. How could they go?

Epaulettes – props from the School of Fine Arts

The presented epaulettes were used as props at the Matejko school of historical painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków.

Statute of the Great Guild in Koszyce given by the City Council

The City Council, the mayor and his deputy played a significant role in the development and functioning of the city. The City Council had the right to issue statutes of guilds.

Major Wyrwa's sheepskin coat

The sheepskin coat was a guerrilla’s personal uniform at the end of activities — in the winter of 1944/1945. Legend has it that the sheepskin coat protected Major Wyrwa against the cold while in a Public Security Office prison. The owner was Józef Wyrwa a.k.a. Furgalski or Stary (b. 1898), a teacher by profession...

Bagpipes

Podhale bagpipes — known in the local dialect as koza, dudy, dudzicki and gajdy. The Podhale bagpipes are a four-toned instrument from the reed aerophone group. They consist of a leather bag that is the air reservoir necessary to blow into the pipes, the bellows; a mouthpiece with which the piper blows into the instrument (duhac), a drone pipe (bąk), and a short triple melody and drone pipe on which the piper plays (gajdzica), set in a wooden casing resembling a goat’s head.

Bogusław Bachorczyk, “Limahl”

The Glamour of the Hollywood world, fashion, and celebrities constantly fascinates artists. It was irresistible to Andy Warhol, who, already in his teens, had created his own collection of photos autographed by celebrities, and, in later years, passionately perused tabloids and magazines for teenagers. He developed his youthful interests in a series of portraits of superstars, such as Marylin Monroe, Elvis Presley, Liz Taylor, and Mick Jagger. To accomplish this, Warhol used photos taken from glossy magazines, newspapers, and commercials, transforming them into series of repeated iconic images.