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Corset

Corset – an element of the traditional women’s outfit in Podhale, made of home-spun brown fabric with a characteristic triangular indent, the so-called szczytek, cut out in the middle of the top front and back parts. The corset comes from the Dzianisz village in the Podhale region, situated north of Zakopane. It was here that in the years 1887–1893 a highlander named Styrczula sold it to the married couple of collectors, Maria and Bronisław Dembowski. In this way, the presented item entered one of the largest and most interesting 19th-century ethnographic collections from Podhale. In 1922 this collection became the property of the Dr. Tytus Chałubiński Tatra Museum in Zakopane by way of legal bequest.

Bonnet of a Jewess

The bonnet has been in the collection since 1960, yet is not known how came to be included there. Four photographs from the exhibit are preserved in the Museum’s archives, purchased in the late 1960s or early 1970s. On the reverse side there is a note stating that the bonnet's owner was Ludwika Popardowska from Brzezna, a village near Nowy Sącz, and it was her mother’s memorabilia.

Men’s shirt for Kraków costume

Shirts were an indispensable element of men’s underwear. Every day, shirts made of linen or hemp homespun fabric were worn, and on special occasions usually ones tailored from well-bleached linen or cotton fabrics, usually factory-made, were used at the end of the 19th century.

Bogusław Bachorczyk, “Limahl”

The Glamour of the Hollywood world, fashion, and celebrities constantly fascinates artists. It was irresistible to Andy Warhol, who, already in his teens, had created his own collection of photos autographed by celebrities, and, in later years, passionately perused tabloids and magazines for teenagers. He developed his youthful interests in a series of portraits of superstars, such as Marylin Monroe, Elvis Presley, Liz Taylor, and Mick Jagger. To accomplish this, Warhol used photos taken from glossy magazines, newspapers, and commercials, transforming them into series of repeated iconic images.

Aset-iri-khet-es mummy cartonnage

The gilded cartonnage was found during the excavations conducted in 1907 in el-Gamhud by the first Polish Egyptologist, Tadeusz Smoleński. The openwork cartonnage is made up of several layers of linen stuck together. On the front and on the reverse, chalk undercoat was placed as the base for polychrome.

Costume “Easter Monday Dziad” by Piotr Opach

Easter Monday Dziad (dziad śmiguśny, dziad śmigustny or słomiak), a costume for a boy or a young man walking on Easter Monday from home to home as part of the śmigus dyngus tradition in Małopolska, in villages around Limanowa. The wooden frame, a dummy imitating a standing person.

Tafetta skirt

Skirt of silk taffeta brocaded with a silk thread – an element of a woman's festive dress from the Podhale region. The skirt comes from Zakopane or its vicinity. Its fabric dates back to the second half of the 18th century. The time when the skirt was made and the period of its use are unknown.

Alms pouch

A small pouch made of a long piece of fabric sewn in half, reinforced on the sides with a silk tape, with a binding in the top part and a hole for a string used to tighten and loosen the pouch. At the bottom, there are decorative elements (tassels) consisting of gold circles made of thread and long single tassels. The whole pouch is embroidered with split stitch, long and short stitch and fishbone stitch. On one side, there are four human figures among thin trees with palmate leaves resembling oak leaves. On the other side, the same young woman is being led up a hill by the old man. Although interpretation of the scenes on the alms pouch is not certain, it is most likely they depict episodes from the story of Tristan and Iseult. The tale of unhappy love of brave Tristan to beautiful Iseult, the wife of king Mark of Cornwall, was written down for the first time in the 12th century and has been reappearing since then in many countries and language versions. Scenes embroidered on the pouch, enrooted in the Arthurian tradition, depict the clash of a sophisticated world of courtly ways (young and beautiful lovers) with wild forces of nature (the old men). There are only several alms pouches with similar decorations preserved until now.