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Krokus enlarger

In 1954, with the launch of production of a twin-lens reflex camera Start, the production of photo processing accessories commenced in the Warsaw Photo-Optical Works. One such device was an enlarger named Krokus. This name was given to subsequent models of enlargers produced until the 1990s. Enlargers of this family bore additional digital marking, e.g. Krokus 3, 4 N Color, 44, 69S, and were produced for various negative formats. Enlargers from Warsaw Photo-Optical Works satisfied the needs of amateur photographers in Poland and many other countries, being a perfect export product for years.

Speed Graphic Camera

Speed Graphic cameras were first used in the 1930s. During the following decades, American photojournalists used large, reporter cameras, equipped with a rangefinder, usually in the format of 3¼ x 4¼ inches or 4 x 5 inches. These were usually the products of the American label of Graflex photographic equipment. The history of this company begins in 1887, as the company of William F. Folmer and William E. Schwing, producing gas lamps and bicycles. Ten years later in New York, Folmer & Schwing Manufacturing Co. began the production of cameras, which soon became its main product. In the years 1907–1926, the company belonged to Eastman Kodak (F.&S. Division of Eastman Kodak Co.), based in Rochester. The manufacturing plants re-established themselves, taking the name Folmer Graflex Corporation, and then, in 1945, Graflex Inc.

Casket containing a set of three porcelain perfume bottles

This wooden casket with a lock is made of dark wood wrought using the technique of intarsia and was used to store three small porcelain bottles. The vessels have the form of decanters imitating decorative pillows with fringes.

Roger&Gallet packagings

Three Roger&Gallet packagings: two cardboard pouncet-boxes and a glass bottle.

COTY powder packaging

A round metal (?) pouncet-box covered in its entirety with a pattern composed of powder brushes on a brick-coloured background. The paintbrush holders were moulded to form a convexity. The lid is slightly convex.

Vessel for vaseline

The porcelain vaseline vessel has a cylindrical shape and a metal lid. The body of the vessel has been painted on the glass into cobalt-coloured patterns. The black inscription “Vaselinum” is flanked by swans positioned alternately.

Oval snuffbox

The oval snuffbox has been made from bovine bone. The lid of the snuffbox is mounted on metal hinges. Around the body and on the lid, rivets and traces of folding/securing the bone plates to the body of the container are visible.

Snuffbox in the shape of a heart

The heart-shaped snuffbox has been made from bovine bone. The lid of the snuffbox is mounted on metal hinges. Around the body and on the lid, rivets and traces of folding/securing the bone plates to the body of the container are visible.

Miner’s axe

The parade miner’s axe inlaid with a bone base. The shaft ornamented with inlay in the form of plates with plant and geometrical motifs. The miner’s emblem (crossed hammers) and the inscription “17 DS 01” engraved on the base, on the other side there is the coat of arms of the Elector of Saxony.

Toy “Wooden locomotive”

This wooden steam train was made by Tadeusz Matusiak in the German prison camp, Luckenwalde (Stalag III-A), in 1944. Tadeusz Matusiak, who was born in Kęty in 1907, was a house painter by profession; from an early age, he painted pictures and carved in wood with great passion. He was a very talented artist.

“Trolley” — prototype (“Let the Artists Die”, 1985)

Wózeczek stał się w spektaklu symbolem wspomnienia dzieciństwa. Czytamy w Przewodniku po spektaklu: „Idziemy ku przodowi w przyszłość, / równocześnie zagłębiając się w rejony / PRZESZŁOŚCI, czyli ŚMIERCI. (...) / Siedzę na scenie, / JA — rzeczywisty, lat 70... / nigdy już nie stanę się na nowo / chłopcem, gdy miałem 6 lat... / wiem o tym, ale pragnienie jest / nieprzeparte, / nieustanne, / napełnia całe moje istnienie... / W drzwiach zjawia się / MAŁY ŻOŁNIERZYK — dziecko / JA — GDY MIAŁEM 6 LAT, / na dziecinnym wózeczku / (na moim wózeczku!)”.

“Bike”/“Manikin of a child on a bike” (“The Dead Class,” 1975)

Bike is an exhibit from Tadeusz Kantor’s performance Umarła klasa [The Dead Class].The premiere took place in the Krzysztofory Gallery in Kraków in November 1975. In the play was a prop of an “old man with a bicycle” going round and round, saying goodbye and leaving in step to the François waltz. The old man was played by Andrzej Wełmiński.

Cranked butter churn

In peasant farmhouses butter was usually made by whipping cream in wooden stave churns. However, this must have been an exhausting activity: hands fainted and the back numbed. Nonetheless, whoever has ever tried real cottage butter shall never regret the effort.

Repository for different part of herbs

Prezentowana szafa, pochodząca z apteki szpitalnej, służyła do przechowywania ziół. Na szufladach zaopatrzonych w żelazne barokowe uchwyty, umieszczone są nazwy surowców leczniczych: „HB. HEDER” ziele bluszczu pospolitego (Hedera helix L.), „HB. HYOSCIAMI” — ziele lulka...

Fan with a court scene

The fan is made of a hand-painted fabric. In the fan’s folds, richly decorated fields with various floral patterns featuring a palette of blues and pinks, coloured using paint gouache, arranged vertically, are clearly visible. Through the floral compositions, there diamond-shaped ornaments, sewn in using golden thread, with the addition of sequins and beads at the corners. Along the fan, runs a strip of alternating brown and azure-blue panels, with white and pink flowers running respectively, in various compositions.

Detective camera by V. Bischoff Company

The detective camera was produced around 1890 by V. Bischoff from Munich (Germany). It is a very rare camera, with a hand-held 9x12 cm disc changer, that allows you to quickly take 12 photos.

Ensign Midget (model 55) — a miniature camera

Ensign Midget Model 55 — a miniature camera designed to take the Ensign E 10 type of film and deliver photographs in the 3.5 x 4.5 cm format. The camera was manufactured between 1934 and 1940 by a London-based company called Houghton (UK).

Stereoscopic camera by Heinrich Ernemann A.G. Company

This is a stereoscopic camera with a folding (scissor) structure for cut films, with a 5.5 x 12.5 cm format. The camera is equipped with two lenses: the Doppel Anastigmat DAGOR III 6.8/80, by CP Goerz of Berlin. The camera for stereoscopic photos was made between 1905 and 1910...

Duchessa Stereo — stereoscopic camera by Contessa Nettel A.G. Company

This is a foldable stereoscopic camera for glass discs, with a 4.5 x 10.7 cm format. The camera is equipped with two lenses — Tessar 1: 4.5 f = 6.5 cm—by Carl Zeiss from Jena. It took pictures (stereo-pair) on a 4.5 x 10.7 cm....

Coronet Midget — minature camera by Coronet Camera Company

The Coronet Midget is a miniature 16 mm film camera, with frame format of 13 x 18 cm, produced in 1935 by the Coronet Camera Company from Birmingham (Great Britain). The camera is equipped with a Taylor Hobson lens...