List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 1921
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

The chalice foot is made on a six-leaf plan, the foot coat and a hexagonal sleeve are decorated with a grapevine spike on a gold-plated background, with six silver medallions with engraved scenes: the Birth of Christ, the Last Supper, the Risen Christ, the Gathering of Manna, the Grape Harvest, the Harvest.

more

The chalice foot is made on a six-leaf plan, the foot coat and a hexagonal sleeve are decorated with a grapevine spike on a gold-plated background, with six silver medallions with engraved scenes: the Birth of Christ, the Last Supper, the Risen Christ, the Gathering of Manna, the Grape Harvest, the Harvest. It has a pear-shaped nodus with an analogical decoration in the form of grape vines, covered with profiled rings. The goblet has been placed in a basket, which is decorated, just like the rest of the goblet, with a single plant motif: the lush tangles of grape vine. At the edge of the goblet, we can find the “800” trial mark, and there are two hallmarks on the base of the foot.
The chalice is dated to 1738 and comes from the workshop of goldsmith Michael Wissmar from Wrocław.

Elaborated by Cardinal Karol Wojtyła Archdiocesan Museum in Kraków, editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

less

“Horror vacui” or “amor vacui” – reflections on the attitude to emptiness

The problem of emptiness has been an important issue in the history of thought. The first attempts to define it and, above all, to prove its existence or non-existence date back to the 5th century BC. Among the many philosophical assumptions, there was the view maintained for a very long time, right up until the 16th century, which was in line with the Aristotelian concept formulated as: nature abhors a vacuum, or horror vacui. Aristotle understood emptiness as a space devoid of a body (matter); however, he rejected its existence, not seeing any reason for it.

more

The problem of emptiness has been an important issue in the history of thought. The first attempts to define it and, above all, to prove its existence or non-existence date back to the 5th century BC. Among the many philosophical assumptions, there was the view maintained for a very long time, right up until the 16th century, which was in line with the Aristotelian concept formulated as: nature abhors a vacuum, or horror vacui. Aristotle understood emptiness as a space devoid of a body (matter); however, he rejected its existence, not seeing any reason for it.
In Aristotelian terminology, specifying the relationship between matter and space has been transposed into an aesthetic principle concerning the relationship between decorations and the surface. Horror vacui meant the fear of an empty space, so its antonym was amor vacui – worship of emptiness. The former defined a trend towards a comprehensive coverage of the surface area with a multitude of motifs, ornamentation or architectural decoration; the latter was just the opposite – oriented towards an almost complete lack of it.
The concept of horror vacui in the context of fine arts was used for the first time in the 19th century by an art and literary critic of Italian origin, Mario Praz. He used it in his critical opinion on Victorian households which – as he wrote – were characterised by untidiness and a stifling atmosphere. The typical features of the Victorian style included a multiplicity of pieces of furniture covered by a multitude of diverse motifs and designs, which, when situated in one space, evoked feelings of heaviness and excess, according to the views of that time. Although the term is used in the history of art, it is not burdened with any aesthetic judgement, and it only defines some indicated qualities of a design.
Depending on the aesthetic principles of a particular artistic period, the amount of decoration used with regard to the plane changed. We can notice a continuous oscillation between these two poles over the centuries. An explosion in decoration can be seen in the artistic periods which departed from the principles associated with classical Vitruvian decorum (appropriateness/suitability of the form in relation to the destination of the work) towards exuberance and a multitude of forms, as well as exaggeration.
Undoubtedly, the relation of the ornamentation to the surface depended on the form of ornamentation. The situation was different in the case of classical ornamentation such as cymatium, meanders, and garlands, which emphasised some elements of a structure in a linear way, and in the case of auricular or rocaille ornamentation, which could outline the contour or fill in entire fields.
Aesthetics and an attitude towards emptiness also differentiate various cultures. Minimalism and purism suggesting amor vacui (see the sculpture Miroir Rouge D by Aliska Lahusen), typical of the art of Japan, may not be found in Arabic art, which sees beauty in a multitude of designs that cover the surface (see the brass vessel – the treasure box from Afghanistan).
At present, the principle less is more, espoused by the modernists, seems to be the predominant aesthetic characteristic, a still-popular term coined by Adolf Loos in the text Ornament and Crime. However, the aesthetic pleasure lies in diversity as variatio delectat (from Latin there's nothing like change), hence both purism and an excess of ornamental forms have evoked a continuous experience and a feast for the eyes through subsequent periods.

Elaborated by Paulina Kluz (Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

See also:
Horror vacui: Throne for a church monstrance, Stipo (studiolo, scrigno) a bambocci writing cabinet with a table, Cup from Michael Wissmar workshop.
Amor vacui: Porcelain vase with a wooden base

less

Jeweller’s code

Objects derived from noble metals were usually marked with signs, so-called features. Their appearance on goldsmith’s products, their number and significance were related to regulations issued by craftsmen’s guilds, then also by city and state authorities. These small marks with numbers and symbols in various shapes, which often remind us of cavities, are an extremely valuable source of information about the artwork. It is possible to specify several types of symbols when recognizing their elements and functions.

more

Objects derived from noble metals were usually marked with signs, so-called features. Their appearance on goldsmith’s products, their number and significance were related to regulations issued by craftsmen’s guilds, then also by city and state authorities. These small marks with numbers and symbols in various shapes, which often remind us of cavities, are an extremely valuable source of information about the artwork. It is possible to specify several types of symbols when recognizing their elements and functions. However, we should remember that their form has changed over the course of history, differing according to location, which makes things difficult because of their quantity.
The first group of features is formed by the individual marks of particular masters as well as workshops. These could include the full name of the master; however, they often appeared in the forms of the majuscule initials. In this case, there was a risk of repeating the monograms, hence — to make a distinction — they were placed in various fields, sometimes with a very fanciful form. In some cases, the mark of the workshop or the later company was also a house mark (in stonemasonry, the signature of the author in a form of a symbol on the stone’s surface).
However, the most common were hallmarks that indicated the percentage of silver contained in the material used for a given goldsmith product. There were many marking schemes, depending on the time, territory, and ruling power, and they were governed by strict regulations. Thanks to this, however, it is possible to determine the approximate time and place of the creation of the work by properly recognizing the features. Hallmarks began to use digital symbols from approximately the nineteenth century (the unit of weight was Lot, hence the lot system), whereas earlier, the town mark itself indicated that the then applicable amount of silver had been used in the alloy.
Town marks support combining products with specific centres. As a sign, they took the form of the coat of arms of the city (or its fragment), sometimes also the entire name of the city, or its first letter.
To check the quality of the products, the works were also marked in state hallmarking centres, hence their name. The hallmark features, made according to the given pattern, contained information about the silver's purity, and sometimes also the date and the letter of the city. At the end of the 18th century, they appeared on the territories of the former Republic of Poland, initially introduced in the Austrian partition.
Furthermore, the contribution features are an interesting example. They marked works which — according to the Austrian contribution (1806) — had been confiscated, and which were then bought up and given back to the owners. That’s why they could be found even on very old products. Such features primarily had a letter indicating the hallmarking centre of a given territory.
Among many additional markings and types of features (there are also customs or reserve features, hallmarks or pawnbroker’s marks, and even marks indicating the dates); the above-mentioned ones constitute their basis.
It should, first of all, be realized that goldsmith marks are a very functional tool thanks to which we are able to — sometimes even with high accuracy — date the work, determine the place of its creation, its author, and trace its history. The goldsmith features — just like any cipher — have their own codification. Catalogues of marks are the best source to learn how to recognize them; nevertheless, they are still not fully drafted.

Elaborated by Paulina Kluz (Editorial team of Małopolskas Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Bibliography:
Michał Gradowski, Dawne złotnictwo: technika i terminologia, Warszawa 1980;
Michał Gradowski, Znaki probiercze na zabytkowych srebrach w Polsce, Warszawa 1988;
Michał Gradowski, Znaki na srebrze: znaki miejskie i państwowe używane na terenie Polski w obecnych jej granicach, Warszawa 1994.

less

Niezwykły program dekoracji kielicha z kolekcji Muzeum Archidiecezjalnego w Krakowie

W Muzeum Archidiecezjalnym Kardynała Karola Wojtyły w Krakowie znajduje się wyjątkowy obiekt związany z winem: to kielich mszalny, podarowany muzeum w 2006 roku przez księdza kardynała Franciszka Macharskiego. Kielichy to najważniejsze i najstarsze naczynia liturgiczne, wykonywane ze szlachetnych metali, a od XVII wieku tylko ze srebra i złota. Związek tego akurat dzieła z winem wynika nie tylko z jego funkcji, ale także z bardzo interesującego programu dekoracji. Dzięki znakom umieszczonym na stopie kielicha wiemy, że powstał on w 1738 roku, w warsztacie złotnika Michaela Wissmara z Wrocławia.

more

W Muzeum Archidiecezjalnym Kardynała Karola Wojtyły w Krakowie znajduje się wyjątkowy obiekt związany z winem: to kielich mszalny, podarowany muzeum w 2006 roku przez księdza kardynała Franciszka Macharskiego. Kielichy to najważniejsze i najstarsze naczynia liturgiczne, wykonywane ze szlachetnych metali, a od XVII wieku tylko ze srebra i złota. Związek tego akurat dzieła z winem wynika nie tylko z jego funkcji, ale także z bardzo interesującego programu dekoracji. Dzięki znakom umieszczonym na stopie kielicha wiemy, że powstał on w 1738 roku, w warsztacie złotnika Michaela Wissmara z Wrocławia (zobacz także: Złotniczy szyfr Pauliny Kluz).

Kielich z warsztatu Michaela Wissmara, 1738, Wrocław, Muzeum Archidiecezjalne im. Kardynała Karola Wojtyły w Krakowie. Digitalizacja: RPD MIK, domena publiczna


Kielich został udekorowany owocującą winną latoroślą: motyw ten odnosi się nie tylko do samego wina, które podczas mszy trafia do kielicha, ale także do biblijnych wzmianek dotyczących winnic. Przede wszystkim sam Chrystus wielokrotnie odwoływał się w swoim nauczaniu do uprawy winorośli. W przypowieściach o robotnikach pracujących w winnicy zawarł zarówno zapowiedź swej męki (Łk 20,9-19, Mt 21,33-46; Mk 12,1-12), jak i naukę o nagrodzie w Niebie (Mt 20, 1-16), a ponadto w Ewangelii według świętego Jana zostało zapisane jego stwierdzenie: „Ja jestem krzewem winnym, wy – latoroślami. Kto trwa we Mnie, a Ja w nim, ten przynosi owoc obfity” (J, 15,5).

Na Eucharystię składają się chleb i wino, które w ofierze mszy stają się Ciałem i Krwią Zbawiciela. Sześć srebrnych medalionów, zdobiących stopę kielicha, odnosi się właśnie do Ciała i Krwi, w przedstawieniach symbolicznych oraz w scenach staro- i nowotestamentowych.

Słowo stało się Ciałem

Kielich z warsztatu Michaela Wissmara – detal: medalion ze sceną Bożego Narodzenia


Scena Bożego Narodzenia w sposób szczególny eksponuje Ciało Chrystusa: nagie Dzieciątko leży na tkaninie, rozpostartej przez Marię. Ikonografia tej kompozycji wywodzi się z późnośredniowiecznych przedstawień Adoracji Dzieciątka, które rozwinęły się dzięki popularności objawień św. Brygidy Szwedzkiej (1303–1373). W jednym ze swych tekstów Brygida opisała mistyczną wizję Bożego Narodzenia, wedle której w grocie w Betlejem Dzieciątko w cudowny sposób przeniknęło przez łono brzemiennej Marii. Ona zaś położyła je na ziemi, a blask bijący z ciała Mesjasza przyćmił światło świecy, którą do groty przyniósł św. Józef. W tego typu przedstawieniach Jezus jest nie tyle nowonarodzonym dzieckiem, ile raczej Słowem, które stało się Ciałem: Hostią otoczoną promieniami, przed którą Maria i Józef padają na kolana. Choć w XVIII wieku popularniejsze były przedstawienia Bożego Narodzenia oparte na przekazie ewangelicznym (z Dzieciątkiem złożonym w żłobie), to w tym przypadku artysta sięgnął do średniowiecznej formuły niewątpliwie po to, aby uwypuklić eucharystyczną symbolikę tej sceny. Dodatkowo, nowonarodzony Jezus nie ma pępka, a zatem został przedstawiony jako Nowy Adam (starotestamentowy Adam miał nie mieć pępka, ponieważ się nie urodził – zaś Mesjasz jest Nowym Adamem, który przychodzi, by odkupić grzech, popełniony przez pierwszego Adama).

Kielich z warsztatu Michaela Wissmara – detal: medalion z przedstawieniem postaci przy żniwach


Po drugiej stronie stopy kielicha zobaczymy postać przy żniwach; jest zatem czytelne, że prezentowane na tkaninie Ciało Mesjasza w Bożym Narodzeniu to zarazem chleb z mszalnej ofiary. Trudno powiedzieć, czy w tym przypadku owa postać przy żniwach nie miała być właśnie starotestamentowym Adamem, w pocie czoła pracującym po wygnaniu z raju. Być może jednak jest to raczej odniesienie do apokaliptycznego opisu żniw, których miał dokonać „Siedzący na obłoku, podobny do Syna Człowieczego”, który „miał złoty wieniec na głowie, a w ręku ostry sierp” (Ap 14,14-15; za tę wskazówkę interpretacyjną dziękuję panu Sławomirowi Stanowskiemu). Apokaliptyczne żniwa to alegoria Sądu Ostatecznego, w odniesieniu do tych, którzy dostąpią Zbawienia.

Manna z nieba

Kielich z warsztatu Michaela Wissmara – detal: medalion z przedstawieniem manny spadającej z nieba


W średniowiecznej sztuce dużą popularnością cieszyły się zestawienia typologiczne scen ze Starego i Nowego Testamentu: zakładano, że wydarzenia starotestamentowe stanowiły zapowiedź konkretnych scen nowotestamentowych. Z Ostatnią Wieczerzą łączono między innymi epizod z Księgi Wyjścia (Wj 16,4-18): oto w drodze do Ziemi Obiecanej Bóg nakarmił Izraelitów na pustyni manną, która spadła z nieba. W Księdze Mądrości manna została określona jako pokarm anielski i chleb z nieba (Mdr 16,20), a jednocześnie Chrystus siebie określił jako chleb, który zstąpił z nieba (J 6,41) – stąd też starotestamentowa manna była interpretowana jako zapowiedź Eucharystii. Po przeciwnej stronie stopy kielicha, zapewne w odniesieniu do sceny zbierania manny, widzimy przedstawienie Ostatniej Wieczerzy – w momencie, kiedy Chrystus błogosławi chleb.

Kielich z warsztatu Michaela Wissmara – detal: medalion ze sceną Ostatniej Wieczerzy

 

Gigantyczne winne grono i źródło życia

Wydaje się, że cztery z sześciu scen dekorujących kielich odnoszą się do eucharystycznego chleba – dwie pozostałe koncentrują się jednak na winie. Jedna z tych scen ukazuje kolejny epizod starotestamentowy, związany z wyjściem Izraelitów z Egiptu i wędrówką do Ziemi Obiecanej. Owa ziemia obiecana to był kraj Kanaan. Jak możemy przeczytać w Księdze Liczb, Mojżesz wysłał tam zwiadowców, którzy wrócili z wielką obfitością owoców, zrodzonych przez tę ziemię: na drągu przynieśli olbrzymie winogrona rosnące na winnym krzewie. Był to znak, że ziemia, którą Bóg obiecał Izraelitom, jest niezwykle urodzajna.

Kielich z warsztatu Michaela Wissmara – detal: medalion z przedstawieniem zwiadowców powracających z winogronami


Tym razem scena starotestamentowa nie została zestawiona z wydarzeniem z Nowego Testamentu, lecz z przedstawieniem o charakterze symbolicznym: to Chrystus jako Źródło Życia (łac. Fons Vitae). Zbawiciel zasiada opierając się o krzyż, na głowie ma cierniową koronę, zaś z pięciu jego ran wytryskują strumienie krwi, niczym z fontanny. W późnym średniowieczu rozwinęły się różne odmiany przedstawień umęczonego Chrystusa, mające symbolikę eucharystyczną: mógł to być Mąż Boleści prezentujący swoje rany (łac. Vir Dolorum), Chrystus w Tłoczni Mistycznej, którego krew staje się winem, albo właśnie Fons Vitae, często w formie kamiennej studni, z krwią tryskającą z ran Chrystusa Ukrzyżowanego lub trzymającego krzyż. Wszystkie te przedstawienia ukazywały Mesjasza w koronie cierniowej, zatem nie był to Chrystus Zmartwychwstały (korona cierniowa została mu zdjęta przed Złożeniem do grobu). W przypadku medalionu z naszego kielicha jest to zarazem przedstawienie Chrystusa Dobrego Pasterza: otaczają go owce pijące ze zbiornika wypełnionego ową tryskającą z ran krwią. Niewątpliwie przedstawienie to można odnieść do fragmentu z Ewangelii wg św. Jana (J 7,37-38): „W ostatnim zaś, najbardziej uroczystym dniu święta, Jezus stojąc zawołał donośnym głosem: »Jeśli ktoś jest spragniony, a wierzy we Mnie - niech przyjdzie do Mnie i pije! Jak rzekło Pismo: Strumienie wody żywej popłyną z jego wnętrza«”.

Kielich z warsztatu Michaela Wissmara – detal: medalion z przedstawieniem Chrystusa jako Źródła Życia


Kielich przechowywany w Muzeum Archidiecezjalnym Kardynała Karola Wojtyły w Krakowie to niewątpliwie unikatowy zabytek; jego dekoracja to niezwykła opowieść o Eucharystii i Zbawieniu, którą warto zgłębić – nie tylko w porze winobrania.

Opracowanie: dr Magdalena Łanuszka
Ten utwór jest dostępny na licencji Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska.

dr Magdalena Łanuszka – absolwentka Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie, doktor historii sztuki, mediewistka. Ma na koncie współpracę z różnymi instytucjami: w zakresie dydaktyki (wykłady m.in. dla Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego, Akademii Dziedzictwa, licznych Uniwersytetów Trzeciego Wieku), pracy badawczej (m.in. dla University of Glasgow, Polskiej Akademii Umiejętności) oraz popularyzatorskiej (m.in. dla Archiwów Państwowych, Narodowego Instytutu Muzealnictwa i Ochrony Zbiorów, Biblioteki Narodowej, Radia Kraków, Tygodnika Powszechnego). W Międzynarodowym Centrum Kultury w Krakowie administruje serwisem Art and Heritage in Central Europe oraz prowadzi lokalną redakcję RIHA Journal. Autorka bloga o poszukiwaniu ciekawostek w sztuce: www.posztukiwania.pl.

 

less

Cup from Michael Wissmar workshop

Pictures


Recent comments

Add comment: