List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 1614
(Votes: 3)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

Mount Fuji is a major symbol of Japan and is placed even on banknotes. It is a holy mountain, the place where, according to beliefs, the protective gods of the country live. An expedition to its peak is like an entrance to a heavenly land bathed in golden light through a thick layer of clouds.

more

Mount Fuji is a major symbol of Japan and is placed even on banknotes. It is a holy mountain, the place where, according to beliefs, the protective gods of the country live. An expedition to its peak is like an entrance to a heavenly land bathed in golden light through a thick layer of clouds.
At present, when we fly by planes on a daily basis, touching the sky is not a unique experience anymore. New technologies obscure a traditional way of seeing the world. Is Mount Fuji, as a symbol, going to become just an element of tradition?
The Winter poster of the Disappearing Japan series may be interpreted in two ways. Firstly, it may be understood literally, as a depiction of a mountain fading away in a snowstorm. The mountain cone looms in the gloom. Small snowflakes, obscuring the view, reflect the light of the moon which is depicted in the background with an unusual precision. But if we looked at Mount Fuji as a concept of Japan, this vanishing mountain could become an image of tradition hidden behind the inconsequential affairs of the present day. Was this intended by the artist?
In his artistic works, Koichi Sato repeatedly took up subjects related to the traditional Japanese culture. In the collection of the Manggha Museum, there are posters created by this author depicting tea ceremony, buyō dance, or related to woodcuts of the famous artist Sharaku created in the years 1794–1795.

Elaborated by Aleksandra Görlich (The Manggha Centre of Japanese Art and Technology), editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

less

“Winter” — a poster by Koichi Sato from the “Disappearing Japan” series

Pictures


Recent comments

Add comment: