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A Hanaire [花入], which is a flower vase used during the tea ceremony, can have many forms — standing, hanging, with a broad spout, or imitating a thin bamboo stem. Hanaire creators are not limited in terms of materials they can use, either. In tea rooms, one can encounter vases made of wicker, hollow calabash, and every kind of ceramic. Those lighter materials are used during summer gatherings; while heavier ones are chosen in winter.

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A Hanaire [花入], which is a flower vase used during the tea ceremony, can have many forms — standing, hanging, with a broad spout, or imitating a thin bamboo stem. Hanaire creators are not limited in terms of materials they can use, either. In tea rooms, one can encounter vases made of wicker, hollow calabash, and every kind of ceramic. Those lighter materials are used during summer gatherings; while heavier ones are chosen in winter.
The presented hanaire, one of a few vases of this kind in the collection of the Manggha Museum, stands out from other vases due to its history. It was created by an artist of the famous Kaneshige family, whose members have been baking ceramics since the 16th century. It was donated to the Manggha Museum by Gisele Jahn, a researcher and collector of Japanese ceramics, in 2010. At that time, the Museum, having suffered damage during a flood, organised an auction. The proceeds of this auction were intended to assist the renovation fund, and artists and collectors, who were sympathetic to the museum, donated their works for that purpose. The artwork in question was not sold, and it remained in the collection of the Museum, being a reminder of those dramatic events that took place a few years previously. It is also a splendid example of bizen ceramics, with its coarse surface and almost metallic shade.

Elaborated by Aleksandra Görlich (The Manggha Centre of Japanese Art and Technology), editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

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Tea — a nasty poison or a healthy drink?

It is difficult to say with certainty when the Polish first encountered tea. Herba the, which means “the tea herb”, probably came to Poland in the 2nd half of the 17th century, and was undoubtedly known in the 18th century already, even though it has never been as popular as coffee.

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It is difficult to say with certainty when the Polish first encountered tea. Herba the, which means “the tea herb”, probably came to Poland in the 2nd half of the 17th century, and was undoubtedly known in the 18th century already, even though it has never been as popular as coffee. Even during the reign of King Stanisław August, the new drink was mainly imbibed by the progressive aristocracy, while people holding more traditional views considered it a hideous and harmful stimulant. Incidentally, they perceived the more popular coffee in a similar way. The unflattering opinion of tea was expressed, among others, by Father Krzysztof Kluk, who was active during the reign of Stanisław August and was of opinion that:

“if China sent us all its poisons, they would not be able to harm us as much as with its tea. It may be that in some cases it is useful, but the frequent use of this warm water weakens the nerves, the digestive organs and their juices, and excessively thins the stool. It is always harmful to children and young people. If the leaves have some efficiency, it is probably not so exceptional that none of the domestic plants could be found which would equal them, and maybe even surpass them”.

It is not true, however, that tea did not earn any recognition in Poland. Tomasz Ormiński, PhD wrote about the infusion of leaves, saying that: “it takes sleepiness away without harm, which is why the merchants who have a lot to write at night, drink Thee in Venice; it benefits the stomach a lot; even I tried a little bit of this herb, but I find coffee more agreeable”.

See:
Tea container
“Hiratemae” imperial tea set used during the summer season
“Hanaire” flower vase used to decorate tea ceremonies
Teapot with lid

Elaborated by Adam Spodaryk (Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums),

Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

 

Bibliography:
Aleksander Brückner, Encyklopedia staropolska, t. 1, Warszawa 1939, p. 435–436.
Zygmunt Gloger, Encyklopedia staropolska, t. 2, Warszawa 1901, p. 246.

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“Hanaire” flower vase used to decorate tea ceremonies

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