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The Centaur sculpture is a copy of one of two marble sculptures found in Rome in 1736, during excavation works in Hadrian's Villa, but substantially reduced in size. At present, the Furietti Centaurs, named after their discoverer, Giuseppe Alessandro Furietti, can be found in the Capitoline Museums in Rome.

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The sculpture is of a centaur: half-man, half horse – it depicts a young man with curly hair and a straight torso, his head is turned left, and his left arm is raised. A coat is slung over the man's left shoulder. The right front leg of the horse is raised, and its tail falls on the right side.
The sculpture is a copy but substantially reduced in size (the original is 156 cm high) of one of two marble sculptures found in Rome, in 1736 during excavation works in Hadrian's Villa. At present, the Furietti Centaurs, named after their discoverer, Giuseppe Alessandro Furietti, can be found in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The Capitoline sculptures, probably created at the request of Hadrian, the Roman Emperor, around the years 117–138, constitute copies of Hellenist sculptures in bronze. These were created by Aristeas and Papias (these names can be seen on the plinths of Hadrian's sculptures). The Young Centaur (also: The Smiling Centaur) is regarded as the depiction of Chiron, the teacher of Asclepius, the centaur famous for his wisdom. It is a counterpart of a sculpture depicting an old centaur. Both sculptures were often copied, especially in the 18th century. There are also known copies dated back to the early 20th century.

Elaborated by  Joanna Winiewicz-Wolska PhD (Wawel Royal Castle), editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

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Sculpture “Young Centaur (Smiling Centaur)”

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