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This bowl sits on a high base with a hemispherical goblet that opens up at the rim. Featuring white-metallised and decorated with a broad inscribed strip filled with geometrical and inscriptional black polish and set against a background of a delicate plant. There is an inscription written in italicised Arabic script with Nastaliq calligraphy and with a niche separating the beginning from the end. Inside it, there is an Arabic inscription praising Allah, always placed at the end of the sacred text.

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This bowl sits on a high base with a hemispherical goblet that opens up at the rim. Featuring white-metallised and decorated with a broad inscribed strip filled with geometrical and inscriptional black polish and set against a background of a delicate plant. There is an inscription written in italicised Arabic script with Nastaliq calligraphy and with a niche separating the beginning from the end. Inside it, there is an Arabic inscription praising Allah, always placed at the end of the sacred text (appearing among others in the Quran verses). Mentioned in the verse are the twelve prophets worshiped by Shia Muslims in Iran, beginning with Muhammad, through Ali – his successor, Saint Fatimah (a daughter of Muhammad, the wife of Ali and the mother of Hasan and Hussein, the martyr brothers) to Mahdi. Among the names of the prophets is an incantatory prayer of praise written in the holy Arabic language (since only prayers in this language can be answered). The inscription is encircled with a ribbon of a grated pattern. Below, there is a frieze of three-leave arcades and palmettes.
The bowl was not used for religious purposes, but it was a dish which was used domestically for holding fruit. A similar bowl dated 1701–1702 can be found in the collection of the State Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg.

Elaborated by Anna Petrus (Wawel Royal Castle), editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

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