List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 1229
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

During the mid-18th century it was popular to set the table on the occasion of the most important ceremonies with porcelain statuettes forming rich iconographic stories. Along the entire length of the table, next to the silverware and the china, sat an arrangement of many statuettes in the form of garden paths, streets or castle arcades, placed on a mirror sheet or coloured sand.

more

The statuette presents a woman carrying a spotted dog and she is wearing a billowing pink dress cut low at the front, an unbuttoned green frock coat and a small peaked cap, as well as yellow shoes. The woman is carrying a gun and a hunting bag on her shoulder. The figure is standing on a small pedestal covered with raised leaves and rocaille ornamentation.
During the mid-18th century it was popular to set the table on the occasion of the most important ceremonies with porcelain statuettes forming rich iconographic stories. Along the entire length of the table, next to the silverware and the china, sat an arrangement of many statuettes in the form of garden paths, streets or castle arcades, placed on a mirror sheet or coloured sand. The minor arts were modelled on court life scenes; hence, there were numerous portrayals of ladies wearing wide crinolines and playing the spinet, depictions of love trysts, as well as hunters' portrayals, as hunting was a popular form of entertainment. The presented statuette is complemented by a figure of A Hunter Killing a Wild Boar.

Elaborated by Dorota Gabryś (Wawel Royal Castle), editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

less

“(...) and it was the famous Saxon porcelain from Myszna (Meissen)”

Two curved and crossed cobalt swords are the hallmark of the porcelain factory in Meissen and have marked its products for over three hundred years. The Meissen Royal Factory first started the production of European porcelain. Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus, in collaboration with Johann Friedrich Böttger, discovered the closely guarded secret of its production in 1708. Under Böttger's supervision, pursuant to the Royal Decree, in 1710, Kursächsische Manufaktur started to function in the castle of Albrechtsburg in Meissen.

more
The trademark of Porcelain Manufactory in Meissen,source: Wikipedia, public domain

Two curved and crossed cobalt swords are the hallmark of the porcelain factory in Meissen and have marked its products for over three hundred years. The Meissen Royal Factory first started the production of European porcelain. Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus, in collaboration with Johann Friedrich Böttger, discovered the closely guarded secret of its production in 1708. Under Böttger's supervision, pursuant to the Royal Decree, in 1710, Kursächsische Manufaktur started to function in the castle of Albrechtsburg in Meissen. The activity of the Meissen factory was divided into several periods, named after the artists employed at the time. Each one of them was a genuine, creative personality, who imparted a unique style to the factory products.
The initial period (1710–1719), under the management of Böttger, was a time of experiments in the field of production. The first European proto-porcelain was the so-called Böttger's red stoneware, which did not require glazing. Johann Jakob Irminger—a goldsmith—was employed in 1711. He adapted the forms of traditional metal utensils for the new material. Further experiments conducted by Böttger, aimed at obtaining a snow-white shade of porcelain, did not bring satisfactory results, and eventually enabled him to achieve a yellowish colour. Despite various attempts at developing pigments and methods of under- and over-glaze painting, the glaze itself was also imperfect. Böttger's death, in 1719, put an end to this pioneering phase of the factory's operation.
The work of the painter, Johann Gregorius Höroldt, started the next stage of technological and artistic development. He turned out to be a brilliant paint specialist or rather the creator of the European onglaze painting decoration on porcelain. Creating motifs for his own products, Höroldt copied the patterns of Chinese and Japanese porcelain. During that period, produced porcelain was extremely exquisitely decorated with chinoiserie, motifs of “Indian blossoms”, various paintings, and landscapes. In the Meissen factory, Höroldt organized a painting workshop, where many prominent painters and technologists worked. That time in the factory's activity was labelled the pictorial period (1719–1731), because, in the field of decoration, painters gained supremacy over sculptors and modelers who worked in the factory at the time.
This situation reversed, when the next phase—called the sculptural period (1731–1763) —commenced. In that period of time, Joachim Kändler was the master modeler. He was considered to be the father of European porcelain sculpture, because he revolutionized the character of Meissen products by emphasizing their plasticity. After 1736, Kändler— as well as making the previously produced porcelain sculptures—began to create small ceramic figurines inspired by court life. For example, he created a great number of "crinoline" statuettes (from crinolines of female figures), actors of commedia dell'arte, and famous figures of Polish men and .[2] His resources expanded in the second half of the eighteenth century. Further figures were created, including characters from genre art scenes, such as figurines of craftsmen, villagers, and beggars, as well as the famous Monkey Orchestra (Affenkapelle ware).[3] Kändler’s best works include: the tableware set made for Aleksander Józef Sułkowski (1735–1737)—the first such set produced at the factory—and the most magnificent Meissen's Swan Tableware, created for the then factory's manager and the later Saxon minister: Heinrich Brühl (1737–1742).
During this period, the paint room, still managed by Höroldt (until 1765), was—in line with the spirit of that era—dominated by the rococo theme of light and delicate court and pastoral scenes in the style of Watteau and Boucher. The previously popular “Indian blossoms” were replaced by the theme of naturalistic representations of plants and insects inspired by botanical patterns, called”.[4] However, since 1739, thanks to the improved technique of cobalt underglaze painting, the production of ceramics, decorated with one of the most famous Meissen decorative motifs—“blue onion”—began.[5]
In the second half of the eighteenth century, the secrets of porcelain production were no longer a mystery. As a result, Meissen lost the monopoly on its production. At that time, there were already many rival manufacturers in Europe, whose products were maintained at a high artistic level. However, Meissen was still the forerunner in the field of porcelain production technique. During the time when the manager of the Meissen factory was Camill Marcolini (1773–1813), its products imitated French porcelain from Sèvres. Items were glazed in white, which made them look like antique marble. After 1814, in Meissen, imitations of products from the popular Wedgwood factory in England were produced: specifically, ceramics with a white relief on a pastel, matte background. The following periods of the Meissen factory's work introduced changes in the forms and types of product decoration, according to the current fashion of the prevailing era.
Undoubtedly, the highest artistic level of the workshop in Meissen was reached in the mid-eighteenth century, during the stewardship of Höroldt and Kändler. The patterns of glaze painting developed at that time and the types of porcelain sculptures established a characteristic repertoire, according to which traditional Meissen porcelain has been manufactured to this day.

Elaborated by Paulina Kluz (Editorial Team of Malopolska's Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Bibliography:
Ludwig Danckwert, Leksykon porcelany europejskiej, tłum. Agata Bobkiewicz, Barbara Bukowska, Roman Warszewski, Gdańsk 2008;
Jan Diviš, Porcelana europejska, Warszawa 1984;
Zygmunt Gloger, Encyklopedia staropolska ilustrowana, t. 4, Warszawa 1903;
Ingelore Menzhausen, Stara porcelana miśnieńska w Dreźnie, tłum. Andrzej Dulewicz, Warszawa 1990;
Maria Piątkiewicz-Dereniowa, Porcelana miśnieńska w zbiorach wawelskich. Katalog zbiorów, t. 1–2, Kraków 1983;
Słownik terminologiczny sztuk pięknych, red. Krystyna Kubalska-Sulkiewicz, Warszawa 1996.


[1] „Indyjskie kwiaty” to motyw zdobniczy zaczerpnięty z dekoracji chińskiej porcelany, utworzony z bujnych krzewów, kwitnących chryzantem i peonii, utrzymany w czerwonej i purpurowej kolorystyce.
[2] Figurki polskie należały do kategorii plastyki „kostiumowej”. Sarmacka kultura z jej wschodnimi strojami sprawiała wrażenie orientalnej dla saskiego dworu zdominowanego przez modę francuską.
[3] Porcelanowe figurki dobierano zazwyczaj z kilku grup tematycznych i komponowano w sceny, które w zależności od konfiguracji postaci wyrażały różne treści. Ustawiane w  takim układzie na lustrzanej tafli pośrodku stołu stanowiły jego dekorację podczas posiłku, zwaną surtout de table.
[4] Pojęcie Deutsche Blumen  obejmuje kilka typów dekoracji roślinnej, a mianowicie kwiaty „graficzne” i „cieniowane”, wzorowane na sztychach, bardzo rysunkowe (1735–1745); kwiaty „naturalistyczne”, malowane na podstawie kompendiów botanicznych (1745–1765); oraz kwiaty „manierystyczne”, czyli kompozycje rozwichrzonych bukietów (po 1765 roku).
[5] Zwiebelmuster to dekoracja typu orientalnego. Jej wzór utworzony jest z pędu bambusa (schakiako) oplecionego przez gałązkę (clematis) oraz z gałązki chryzantemy i japońskiego kwiatu (ominashi), które są obramowane owocami granatu i brzoskwiniami, przypominającymi właśnie tytułową cebulę.

less

“White gold” – concerning the beginnings of European porcelain

Chinese and Japanese porcelain was once an extremely valuable and desirable product in Europe, which was already being imported in the Middle Ages. It was called “white gold”, because it commanded value comparable to this precious metal and was often used as its substitute (e.g. as a gift). At that time, porcelain was viewed as a synonym of luxury and its possession testified to the splendour of the house; only the wealthiest people—mainly royalty—could afford it. In the modern era—in connection with the fashion for Orientalism—porcelain gained such great popularity, that a great effort was made to discover how it was manufactured: one of the most guarded secrets of the East.

more

Chinese and Japanese porcelain was once an extremely valuable and desirable product in Europe, which was already being imported in the Middle Ages. It was called “white gold”, because it commanded value comparable to this precious metal and was often used as its substitute (e.g. as a gift). At that time, porcelain was viewed as a synonym of luxury and its possession testified to the splendour of the house; only the wealthiest people—mainly royalty—could afford it.
Porcelain is the finest type of ceramics. The formula of its manufacture was developed in China as early as the 7th century. In the modern era—in connection with the fashion for Orientalism—porcelain gained such great popularity, that a great effort was made to discover how it was manufactured: one of the most guarded secrets of the East. Initially, half-measures were used to obtain faience: a type of ceramics differing from the mineral composition of porcelain clay, but bearing the closest resemblance to it after firing. Through the use of a similar form, and characteristic cobalt under-glaze decorations on a white background, producers attempted to give it the appearance of original Chinese porcelain. The second half of the 17th and the first half of the 18th centuries was the period in which the greatest number of porcelain imitations were manufactured in Europe. 
The first product of this kind was the so-called Medici porcelain, which was made in Florence in the 16th century. However, these vessels had an original form and resembled Chinese porcelain only in its colour scheme. Around 1600, in the French city of Nevers, the production of faience in the Italian tradition began, which—due to the then contemporary fashion trends—adopted the Chinese cobalt-white colour palette and stylistics in the middle of the 17th century. The history of the famous Delft faience—also produced since the beginning of the 17th century—was similar. At the beginning of the factory's operation, a characteristic collection of decorative motifs was developed, depicting landscapes or genre scenes, most often cobalt patterns on a white background (patterns of Dutch ceramics recognizable to the present day). In line with the increasing fashion for Chinese products in the second half of the century, Delft faience stared to resemble such products through the shape of its vessels and decorations, modelled on those from the Far East, although still retaining local features. In the following decades, the trend for this type of product resulted in the establishment of other production facilities of porcelain imitations, which vied with one another in the field of ideas for production techniques and designs of crockery.
The real breakthrough was the invention of a technique for making European porcelain by Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus in 1708. Von Tschirnhaus's research was continued by his collaborator, Johann Friedrich Böttger ( an alchemist who, before embarking on the research into the production of the "white gold", had conducted experiments on transmutating other metals into gold). In 1710, under Böttger's supervision, porcelain production commenced in the first European factory founded by Augustus II the Strong—Kursächsische Manufaktur—at the Albrechtsburg castle in Meissen. Saxon (or Meissen) porcelain was met with great appreciation from the very beginning and has been since produced almost continuously to the present day.

See also:
Chinese porcelain salt shaker
“Hydria” apothecary vase
Teapot with lid
Porcelain vase with a wooden base

Elaborated by Paulina Kluz (Editorial Team of Malopolska’s Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Bibliography:
Ludwig Danckwert, Leksykon porcelany europejskiej, tłum. Agata Bobkiewicz, Barbara Bukowska, Roman Warszewski, Gdańsk 2008;
Słownik terminologiczny sztuk pięknych, red. Krystyna Kubalska-Sulkiewicz, Warszawa 1996.

less

Serwisy stołowe dawniej

Naczynia, prócz swojej głównej funkcji użytkowej, zaczęły z czasem pełnić również rolę dekoracyjną, świadczącą o statusie ich właściciela. Początkowo miały uniwersalny charakter, jednak wraz z rozbudową ceremoniału związanego z jedzeniem i jego oprawy przeszły swoistą metamorfozę. Przede wszystkim ilość naczyń znacząco się powiększyła, gdyż utensylia o określonej formie przeznaczone były już do konkretnych dań. Odpowiedni dobór naczyń przeznaczonych do danych posiłków i napojów tworzył serwis (śniadaniowy, obiadowy, do herbaty, do kawy, do czekolady etc.), czyli komplet charakteryzujący się jednolitą dekoracją. Poszczególne serwisy mogły należeć do jednej całości wraz z serwisem obiadowym, najczęściej jednak stanowiły odrębne komplety. Szczególny rozwój bogato dekorowanych i rozbudowanych serwisów charakterystyczny był dla XVIII wieku, kiedy do użycia wchodziły wyroby z fajansu i porcelany, zastępując powoli gliniane i metalowe naczynia.

more

Naczynia, prócz swojej głównej funkcji użytkowej, zaczęły z czasem pełnić również rolę dekoracyjną, świadczącą o statusie ich właściciela. Początkowo miały uniwersalny charakter, jednak wraz z rozbudową ceremoniału związanego z jedzeniem i jego oprawy przeszły swoistą metamorfozę. Przede wszystkim ilość naczyń znacząco się powiększyła, gdyż utensylia o określonej formie przeznaczone były już do konkretnych dań.

Odpowiedni dobór naczyń przeznaczonych do danych posiłków i napojów tworzył serwis (śniadaniowy, obiadowy, do herbaty, do kawy, do czekolady etc.), czyli komplet charakteryzujący się jednolitą dekoracją. Poszczególne serwisy mogły należeć do jednej całości wraz z serwisem obiadowym, najczęściej jednak stanowiły odrębne komplety. Szczególny rozwój bogato dekorowanych i rozbudowanych serwisów charakterystyczny był dla XVIII wieku, kiedy do użycia wchodziły wyroby z fajansu i porcelany, zastępując powoli gliniane i metalowe naczynia.

Najbardziej rozbudowany pod względem ilościowym był serwis obiadowy. W jego skład wchodziły wazy na zupy, tzw. teryny, wazy do potraw o półpłynnej konsystencji, półmiski owalne do pieczystego i okrągłe do warzyw, całość uzupełniały salaterki, sosjerki, pojemniki do przypraw, kosze do owoców, do chleba oraz oczywiście talerzyki, głębokie i płaskie. W serwisach można było niekiedy znaleźć również wanienki do płukania i chłodzenia kieliszków, czyli weniery, oraz wiaderka do chłodzenia wina.

Odmiennym doborem naczyń charakteryzowały się serwisy do herbaty, kawy bądź czekolady. W skład każdego z nich wchodziły filiżanki o różnej formie razem ze spodkami (np. w serwisie do czekolady – wysokie filiżanki dwuuszne), należały do nich różne dzbanuszki, dzbanki, cukierniczki, mleczniki, puszki (np. puszka na herbatę) etc. Serwisy te mogły być przeznaczone dla wielu osób bądź stanowić zestaw wyłącznie dla dwóch, tzw. tête-à-tête, jak również istniały zastawy jednoosobowe, czyli solitery (fr. solitaire).

Modelowym przykładem pełnej zastawy stołowej składającej się ze wszystkich serwisów o tej samej dekoracji był miśnieński serwis Aleksandra Józefa Sułkowskiego, utworzony z serwisów: obiadowego, do kawy, do czekolady, deserowego (kubki cylindryczne na wermut, talerze, patery kredensowe na nóżkach, paterki, puszki na kandyzowane owoce, kociołki prostokątne, patery, płaskie misy) oraz zastawy do przypraw (tafelaufplatz, plat de manage), dekoracji środka stołu (sourtout de table) i lichtarzy.

Tego rodzaju zastawa, prócz tego, że była bardzo rozbudowana, posiadała również rzeźbiarsko kształtowaną formę oraz bardzo bogatą dekorację malarską. W niektórych przypadkach forma wręcz przerastała funkcję, jak chociażby w zastawie do przypraw (plat de menage) stanowiącej nieraz kilkukondygnacyjną konstrukcję, bogato rzeźbioną. Właśnie z niej wyodrębniła się osobna dekoracja środka stołu  ̶  sourtout de table, nie pełniąca żadnej innej funkcji, jak wyłącznie zdobniczą i treściową. Składała się z porcelanowych figurek komponowanych w grupy, na tle różnych aranżacji i konstrukcji. Była to jednak szczególna oprawa stołu, gdyż dobór postaci nie był przypadkowy. Dekoracja stołu miała za zadanie przekazywać jakąś myśl przewodnią podczas danej wystawnej uroczystości. Tylko w wyjątkowych przypadkach sourtout de table wykonywane było na zlecenie jako jeden, wielki zespół o określonym programie ikonograficznym. Tego rodzaju figurki porcelanowe tworzone były w manufakturach w seriach tematycznych (zob. Małpią orkiestrę, typy narodowe, np. Polki i Polacy), które kupowano i łączono według uznania, tak aby ilustrowały założoną koncepcję treściową.

Zastawę stołową i figurki przechowywano w dworskich kredensach. Jak pisze Zygmunt Gloger w Encyklopedii Staropolskiej: „(…) kredens urządzony był zwykle w końcu sali jadalnej, za balasami jak klatka, żeby do niego przystęp miał tylko kredencerz i ci, którzy mu pomagają: zmywający i obcierający naczynia. Nikomu innemu wnijść tam nie było wolno. Co potrzebnem było, usługujący do stołu odbierali przez balasy i podawali równie. W tej jakby komorze zabalasowanej stał jeden wielki stół i szafy kredensowe albo schodki aż pod sufit zastawione srebrem, miedzią i farfurą. Później dopiero nastał zwyczaj umieszczania kredensu w osobnym pokoiku przy jadalni”. Na dworze istniała nawet osobna funkcja kredencerza, który był odpowiedzialny za dobra przetrzymywane w kredensie, a więc „srebra i farfury” oraz za rozkładanie ich na stole i ustawienie dekoracji stołu.

Opracowanie: Paulina Kluz (Redakcja WMM),
Licencja Creative Commons

Ten utwór jest dostępny na licencji Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska.

Bibliografia:
Elwira Bogusławska, Kultura materialna okolic Błaszek w XVIII wieku: http://www.boguslawscy.pl/pl/?site=11 [dostęp: lipiec 2017].
Kredencerz, Kredens, [w:] Zygmunt Gloger, Encyklopedja staropolska, Warszawa 1900: http://literat.ug.edu.pl/~literat/glogers/0021.htm [dostęp: lipiec 2017].
Wanda Załęska, Rozwój form zastaw stołowych i porcelanowych dekoracji stołu w 1 połowie XVIII wieku (na wybranych przykładach), [w:] Zastawy stołowe XVI – XX. Materiały z sesji towarzyszącej wystawie „Splendor stołu” w Muzeum Sztuki Złotniczej, Kazimierz Dolny 26–27 października 2006, s. 23–36.

less

Statuette of a Woman in Hunting Clothes

Pictures


Recent comments

Add comment: