List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 5639
(Votes: 3)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

Imaginary animals are not predominant in tapestry presentations but sometimes appear there. Their presence usually has a symbolic meaning. In the tapestry Dragon Fighting with a Panther, this is derived from Physiologus, which is an ancient treatise on animals containing, aside from their description, an allegorical interpretation of animals, plants and minerals. According to it, the panther is loved by all animals, with the exception of the dragon. Such a presentation was interpreted as an allegory of Christ's struggle against Satan. Here, the dragon symbolises the forces of evil, and the panther the forces of good.

more

This is one of the most famous verdures in the collection of Sigismund II Augustus. A dragon and a panther fight in a forest clearing. On the left side of the scene, three young dragons crowd together: above them, on an overgrown fallen tree, another panther lurks, possibly hurrying to help the one already fighting. In the bottom right corner, a lizard stands stock-still. Further in the background, by the lake, another predator can be seen, as well as a deer and two fantastic hoofed creatures.
Imaginary animals are not predominant in tapestry presentations, but sometimes appear. Their presence usually has a symbolic meaning. In the tapestry Dragon Fighting with a Panther, the symbolism is derived from Physiologus, an ancient treatise on animals containing, aside from their description, allegorical interpretations of animals, plants and minerals. According to the treatise, the panther is loved by all animals, with the exception of the dragon. A presentation such as this one, would have been interpreted as an allegory of Christ's struggle against Satan. Here, the dragon symbolises the forces of evil, and the panther the forces of good.
The tapestry is part of a small group of five large, rectangular verdures. A wide border with mythological deities, festoons and bouquets of flowers closes the pictorial field of the tapestry along its upper edge.

Elaborated by Magdalena Ozga (Wawel Royal Castle), editorial team of Małopolska's Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

less

The history of Sigismund Augustus’s collection of tapestries

Sigismund Augustus probably ordered some of these fabrics around the year 1548. According to Wychwalnik weselny [Wedding praiser] by Stanisław Orzechowski (Panagyricus Nuptiarum Sigimundi Augusti Poloniae Regis, ed. 1553), the three series of tapestries: the History of the First Parents, the Story of Moses and the Story of Noah already adorned the interiors of Wawel Castle on 30 July 1553, for the wedding celebrations of Sigismund Augustus and Catherine of Austria. It is assumed that after this year the king ordered further fabrics, and that around 1560, the entire collection was already in his possession.
 

more

Sigismund Augustus probably ordered some of these fabrics around the year 1548. According to Wychwalnik weselny [Wedding praiser] by Stanisław Orzechowski (Panagyricus Nuptiarum Sigimundi Augusti Poloniae Regis, ed. 1553), the three series of tapestries: the History of the First Parents, the Story of Moses and the Story of Noah already adorned the interiors of Wawel Castle on 30 July 1553, for the wedding celebrations of Sigismund Augustus and Catherine of Austria. It is assumed that after this year the king ordered further fabrics, and that around 1560, the entire collection was already in his possession.
In his last will from the year 1571, the heirless Sigismund Augustus stated that his collection of tapestries would be redistributed to his three sisters: Sophie, Duchess of Brunswick; Catherine, Queen of Sweden; and  the future Queen of Poland, Anne. According to the king’s will, after their deaths, the collection was to become the property of the Polish and Lithuanian Commonwealth. As early as 1572, the tapestries were deposited in the royal castle in Tykocin, and then they were split between the royal residences (Kraków, Niepołomice, Grodno, and Warsaw). In 1578, Anna handed part of the collection to one of the heirs in Stockholm — Catherine — and, by chance, the tapestries returned to Poland in 1587 or 1591, together with the son of the latter, King Sigismund III Vasa.
Traditionally, the tapestries were part of the artistic setting of the most important royal celebrations, even after the death of Sigismund Augustus. The tapestries were used during the king’s funeral ceremony in 1572, as well as during the coronation of Henry III of France in 1574. After these events, they returned to their function in 1592, when they decorated the Wawel chambers during the first wedding of Sigismund III Vasa to Anne of Austria, as well as during his second — with her sister Constance of Austria in 1605. Sigismund’s tapestries were also used as the decorations in St. John’s Archcathedral and in the royal castle in Warsaw, during the wedding of king Władysław IV to Cecilia Renata in September 1637.
During the Swedish Deluge (1655–1657), the collection was moved to an unknown location. Against the will of Sigismund Augustus, the tapestries were treated as private property by King Jan Kazimierz Vasa and became the subject of the political games of the abdicating ruler. The ex-king took a loan against the “Deluge Curtains” (as the tapestries were then collectively labelled), which was handed over to Francis Grattta, a banker and merchant from Gdansk. Then, in 1669, Jan Kazimierz — in order to secure the guaranteed commission for himself — ordered Grattta to hide the tapestries. In spite of this, in February 1670, the collection was borrowed from a “mysterious” storage place in order to decorate the monastery and the church of the Pauline Fathers at Jasna Góra, on the occasion of the wedding of Michał Korybut Wiśniowiecki to Eleanor of Austria and for the decoration of the St. John’s Archcathedral in Warsaw, during the coronation of Eleanor. The death of Jan Kazimierz did not solve the problem, because the Commonwealth and the heir of the ex-king both had claims to the tapestries being still subject of lien. In 1673, the Deluge Declaration was passed, according to which only the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania could claim the collection of tapestries, and it was the only entity which could redeem them, as it did in 1724. The recovered collection of fabrics was placed in the monastery of Discalced Carmelites in Warsaw. From then on, the tapestries belonged to the Crown Treasury, managed by consecutive treasurers. They were used, among others, during the Corpus Christi ceremonies, as well as for the decoration of St. John’s Archcathedral and Warsaw Castle, on the occasion of the coronation of Stanisław August Poniatowski in 1768.
Since 1785, the collection was stored in the Palace of the Commonwealth, which performed the function of state archive. Ten years later, in November 1795, during the siege of Warsaw laid by the invader’s army — on the orders of Catherine II — the fabrics were stolen and brought to the storehouses of the Taurida Palace in St. Petersburg. After 1860, the collection of tapestries was separated, some of which were used to decorate the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg and the tsar’s residences in Gatchina and Livadia in the Crimea, while others were transferred to the Museum of Court Stables, the collections of the Academy of Fine Arts, and the Theatre Office. Only after one hundred and twenty-six years — thanks to the Treaty of Riga in 1921—were most of the old tapestries recovered from the Soviet Union; the return of the collection was accomplished in instalments by 1928.
In September 1939, at the outbreak of World War II, a decision was made to move all the tapestries, along with other works from the Wawel treasury, outside Poland. The artefacts were moved  to France through Romania, where they were repaired in Aubusson weaving centre. After the French resistance was crushed, the collection was transported by sea to England. The latter also turned out to be a dangerous place, because the Battle of Britain was about to begin. Because of this, the tapestries were transported to Canada on the Polish ship Batory, where they were stored in very good conditions. After the end of the world war, the Canadian authorities delayed returning the deposit, because they were concerned with the political situation in Poland after 1945. Maurice Duplessis, the guardian of the tapestries in Quebec, was the one who resisted that idea with particular vehemence. The threat of the appropriation of the tapestries by the Canadian government caused a huge uproar in the country and among the officials of the Polish government-in-exile. Only after the death of Duplessis in 1959, thanks to numerous interventions and the great efforts of leading Polish figures, were the tapestries reclaimed and returned to Wawel, in February 1961.
Two of the identified tapestries from the former collection of Sigismund Augustusts are outside Wawel. The first fabric — The moral decline of humanity from series the Story of Noah — was found in the Kremlin and returned to Poland in 1977, as a gift of the Soviet authorities for the reconstruction of the Warsaw castle, where it is held to this day. On the other hand, the other one — the only tapestry intended for presentation above windows, preserved in its entire form — for some unknown reason, found its way from Russia to the antiquarian market. It was purchased by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and it has been part of their collection since 1952.

Elaborated by Magdalena Ozga (Wawel Royal Castle), Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

less

Theatre of Nature

The complete novelty was an animal and plant landscape, no longer treated as a background or complement to the scene, but as a separate subject matter. This type of textile was called a verdure (French: verdure) from the word verdir, or “to paint in green”, because of the predominance of this colour. It is sometimes claimed that one of inspirations for this kind of woven depictions was the hunting preferences of clients , as they are often also described as tapestries “to admire hunting” (ad venationem spectantia peristromata) or “fighting animals” (pugnae ferarum). The plant and animal landscape as a separate subject matter initially appeared in tapestries, later in paintings (for example paintings by Roelant Savery, 1576–1639). Verdures created between 1553 and 1560 that are part of the collection of tapestries of Sigismund II Augustus are probably among the first examples of this subject matter in tapestry art.

more

Nature has always been a very important source of inspiration for fine arts. The original interest in it as a model evolved over time into a real cognitive and documentary passion for the surrounding world. Artists interested in the appearance of animals, diverse in terms of forms and colours, and the way they move, as well as the structure and behaviour of plants, studied their nature with analytical inquisitiveness. This kind of scientific and artistic work contributed to the development of the natural sciences.
Realistic tendencies in the field of weaving art appeared in the late Middle Ages. One example of this can be tapestries of the millefleur type, manufactured in France and Flanders from the beginning of the fifteenth century. They depicted figural scenes and heraldic motifs presented against a background of a flat meadow devoid of perspective, filled with the title “a thousand flowers” and figures of animals and insects (e.g. the series The Lady and the Unicorn of the late fifteenth century). Flora and fauna were shown in textiles in a totally naturalistic manner, which allows us today to recognise the majority of their species.
Somewhat later, a complete novelty was an animal and plant landscape, no longer treated as a background or complement to the scene, but as a separate subject matter. This type of textile was called a verdure (French: verdure) from the word verdir, or ”to paint in green”, because of the predominance of this colour. It is sometimes claimed that one of inspirations for this kind of woven depictions was the hunting preferences of clients, as they are often also described as tapestries “to admire hunting” (ad venationem spectantia peristromata) or “fighting animals” (pugnae ferarum). The plant and animal landscape as a separate subject matter initially appeared in tapestries, later in paintings (for example paintings by Roelant Savery, 1576–1639). Verdures created between 1553 and 1560 that are part of the collection of tapestries of Sigismund II Augustus are probably among the first examples of this subject matter in tapestry art.

Porcupine, Conrad Gesner, Historiae Animalium, Vol. 1, 1551, source: Wikipedia, public domain (compare with the over-door tapestry with the Arms of Poland on landscape background with animals - Beaver and Porcupine)

All sorts of collections of patterns available in the sixteenth century, such as sketchbooks (taccuino di disegni), very popular engravings by Albrecht Dürer, zoological atlases or works of animaliers and naturalists such as Pierre Belon and Conrad Gesner, the author of the famous Historiae animalium, provided a rich source of inspiration for artists of that period. Works of this type were included in the range of creative inspiration of weaving workshops and constituted a source of an extensive and relatively unchanging repertoire of motifs, as evidenced by a repetitive nature of certain kinds of animals, for example in tapestries of one series. Tapestries also showed exotic animals from Africa and the New World. This resulted from an interest in contemporary geographical discoveries. In the case of less known or fantastic specimens, creators of tapestries tried to depict them by making use of descriptions, as well as various accounts and legends; that is why their images were often created on the basis of projection. Interestingly, at that time many of the views on the origin, nature and symbolism of plants and animals still constituted a lasting legacy of antiquity and the Middle Ages (Physiologus). Artist used available patterns, in which individual specimens were presented as isolated, devoid of any context because animals and plants themselves were their object of interest. Therefore, they did not take into account realities such as the natural environment of existence, and put them together according to their own invention; that is why an exotic animal, such as a camel, could unexpectedly appear with rabbits in the middle of a broadleaved forest (Tapestry A Camel, a Rabbit and a Peacock).
Verdures ilustrated botanical and zoological knowledge at that time in which the real world interspersed with the imaginary one. Therefore, they can be treated as a “theatre of nature”, in which the setting was a mannerist forest and actors were real and fantastic creatures. Separated from the natural environment and arbitrarily compiled, they resulted in the whole composition creating an image slightly diverging from reality, even though its every detail constituted a fully realistic representation of elements of nature.

Elaborated by Paulina Kluz (Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Bibliography:
Maria Hennel-Bernasikowa, Arrasy krajobrazowo-zwierzęce (Animal and landscape tapestries), [in:] Arrasy wawelskie (The Wawel Tapestries), edited by Jerzy Szablowski, Anna Misiąg-Bocheńska, Maria Hennel-Bernasikowa, Magdalena Piwocka, Warszawa 1994, pp. 173–268;
Magdalena Piwocka, Arrasy Zygmunta Augusta (The Tapestries of Sigismund Augustus),  Kraków 2007;
Magdalena Piwocka, Arrasy króla Zygmunta Augusta: zwierzęta, cz. 1 (The Tapestries of King Sigismund Augustus: Animals, Part 1), Kraków 2009;
Słownik terminologiczny sztuk pięknych (Terminological Dictionary of Fine Arts), Krystyna Kubalska-Sulkiewicz (ed.), Warszawa 2002.

less

From Ornament of Late Antiquity to Netherlandish Grotesque

On one of the seven hills of Rome – the Esquiline Hill – caves full of ancient paintings were excavated around 1480 under the foundations of medieval buildings. Their walls were decorated with fantastic, light and symmetrical structures created of figural, animal and floral motifs. La grotte, or caves, were in fact ruins of the villa of the Emperor Nero. It was called Domus Aurea because of the extraordinarily rich decoration of the walls and the inner part of the dome, which were covered with gold and paintings. They were created between AD 54 and 68 and related to the turn of the Third Style and Fourth Style of Pompeian painting.

 

more

On one of the seven hills of Rome – the Esquiline Hill – caves full of ancient paintings were excavated around 1480 under the foundations of medieval buildings. Their walls were decorated with fantastic, light and symmetrical structures created of figural, animal and floral motifs. La grotte, or caves, were in fact ruins of the villa of the Emperor Nero. It was called Domus Aurea because of the extraordinarily rich decoration of the walls and the inner part of the dome, which were covered with gold and paintings. They were created between AD 54 and 68 and related to the turn of the Third Style and Fourth Style of Pompeian painting.

Grotesque, Raphael Santi, decoration of the Vatican loggias, 1518, source: Wikipedia, public domain

The term grotesque (grottesche) was derived from the name of the finding (la grotte). The way the ornament is called can also be translated as “weird, weirdness”. In its form, grotesque resembled ornaments of ancient origin popular in the Renaissance, namely arabesque or Islamic moresque. However, they both assumed the shape of a more or less stylised braided plants; on the other hand, grotesque was enriched with numerous additional motifs, and it created a fantastic structure. Formally, the latter was also close to its predecessor – the late medieval braided plants – since characters and animals were entwined in it in the same way. However, in medieval ornament it had an apotropaic or allegorical function.
Renaissance ornamentation was immensely influenced by the discovery of Domus Aurea. The finding was the main source of inspiration for artists, even though at that time there were known examples of other ancient grotesques decorating, for instance, the Colosseum and Hadrian’s villa in Tivoli. The popularity and strengthening of the fashion for Renaissance grotesque was primarily an effect of the influence of works by artists from the early 16th century, which were travesty of ancient paintings. The most important works of art in this field were paintings of the Vatican loggias, the Villa Madama and Palazzo Baldassini – the works of Raphael and his apprentice Giovanni da Udine. They were almost a total novelty in the field of decoration and this contributed to their extraordinary popularity among contemporary artists. Grotesque became a decoration type widely known and used in the 1st half of the 16th century (especially after 1520) thanks to the Italian works mentioned above, as well as widely accessible patterns created by ornamentalists.
Through numerous imitations of ancient grotesque in various art centres, this ornament gained its local variants. Netherlandish grotesque, even though based on the same formula as the Italian one, had a slightly different structure and elements. It gained extraordinary popularity thanks to replicated in graphic arts designs of Cornelis Floris or Cornelis Bos (e.g. The Book of Moresque of 1554), ornamentalists unequalled in their skill and imagination.
Initially, Netherlandish grotesque included mostly floral motifs but in time, because of oriental inspirations, exotic animals and fantastic creatures appeared, as well. The following mythological motifs were depicted particularly frequently: pairs of deities, their frolics, Bacchic processions, and various fantastic creatures or hybrids of human, animals and plants. In their details, depictions of an allegorical nature and even allusions to the exoticism of the New World (e.g. figures of Indians) can be noticed.
Netherlandish grotesque seemed to be, above all, more filled up than the Italian one. It had a much richer repertoire of motifs, and its spaces, separated in a certain way by the structure (scaffolding), were almost entirely filled with ripe fruit garlands and putti, as well as exotic plants and animals. However, horror vacui did not disturb the sense of order, which was controlled by the symmetry of the arrangement of all elements of the decoration. Interestingly, in its expanded form, the scaffolding structure, on which individual elements were based, was similar to metal fittings and fragments of rolled metal sheet, heralding the ferrule ornament that appeared in the art of the Netherlands in the mid-16th century.
The specificity of Netherlandish grotesque was its characteristic dualism manifested in the almost encyclopaedic realism of some depictions of plants and animals (species of which we are able to recognise), as well as fantasy affecting construction of its form, typical of this ornament.

See also:
Borders of tapestries of the Story of the First Parents, Story of Noah and Story of the Tower of Babel series;
Grotesque tapestries of monogram, heraldic and under-window types
Grotesque decoration of a pharmaceutical mortar

Elaborated by Paulina Kluz (Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

Bibliography:
Aleksandra Bernatowicz, Niepodobne do rzeczywistości. Malowana groteska w rezydencjach Warszawy i Mazowsza 17771821 (Unlike reality. Painted grotesque in residences of Warsaw and Mazovia), Warszawa 2006;

Magdalena Piwocka, Arrasy z groteskami (Tapestries with grotesques), [in:] Arrasy wawelskie (Wawel Tapestries), edited by Jerzy Szablowski, Anna Misiąg-Bocheńska, Maria Hennel-Bernasikowa, Magdalena Piwocka, Warszawa 1994, pp. 271–348;
Słownik terminologiczny sztuk pięknych (Terminological Dictionary of Fine Arts), Krystyna Kubalska-Sulkiewicz, Warszawa 2007.

less

Smoki w sztuce średniowiecznej: profanum

Bogata kultura średniowiecznej Europy była mieszanką tradycji antycznych (grecko-rzymskich i bliskowschodnich) oraz północnoeuropejskich wierzeń ludów, które Rzymianie określali barbarzyńcami. W mitach wszystkich tych kręgów kulturowych występowały smoki, nic więc dziwnego, że w średniowiecznej literaturze i sztuce wielokrotnie pojawiały się te fascynujące stworzenia. Mieszana natura smoków pozwalała wiązać te bestie z każdym z czterech żywiołów: wedle wielu legend smoki żyły w wodzie, wedle innych chowały się w ziemi; ponadto zionęły ogniem oraz miały skrzydła, więc mogły się wznosić w powietrze.

more

Bogata kultura średniowiecznej Europy była mieszanką tradycji antycznych (grecko-rzymskich i bliskowschodnich) oraz północnoeuropejskich wierzeń ludów, które Rzymianie określali barbarzyńcami. W mitach wszystkich tych kręgów kulturowych występowały smoki, nic więc dziwnego, że w średniowiecznej literaturze i sztuce wielokrotnie pojawiały się te fascynujące stworzenia. Mieszana natura smoków pozwalała wiązać te bestie z każdym z czterech żywiołów: wedle wielu legend smoki żyły w wodzie, wedle innych chowały się w ziemi; ponadto zionęły ogniem oraz miały skrzydła, więc mogły się wznosić w powietrze.

Smok z wawelskiego arrasu

Wśród arrasów ze zbiorów Zamku Królewskiego na Wawelu znajduje się tkanina z przedstawieniem walki smoka z panterą. Arras ten pochodzi z kolekcji Zygmunta Augusta, powstał w Brukseli ok. 1555 roku, a zaprojektował go artysta z kręgu Pietera Coecke van Aelsta. Temat tego arrasu odnosi się do opowieści, którą znajdziemy w średniowiecznych bestiariuszach.

Arras Walka smoka z panterą, ok. 1555, Zamek Królewski na Wawelu, digitalizacja: RPD MIK, domena publiczna


Bestiariusze (bestiaria) były to księgi zawierające opisy zwierząt, zarówno tych prawdziwych, jak i fantastycznych. Opisom towarzyszyły wyjaśnienia o charakterze moralizującym, tłumaczące chrześcijańską symbolikę każdej bestii. Głównym źródłem tekstowym średniowiecznych bestiariuszy był Physiologus („Fizjolog” – nazwa ta wywodzi się od początkowych słów tekstu: „Fizjolog mówi, że…”). Był to anonimowy tekst grecki, powstały prawdopodobnie na terenie Egiptu (może w Aleksandrii?). Niektórzy badacze datowali go na II wiek, obecnie zaś większość opowiada się raczej za połową III stulecia lub początkami IV. W każdym razie tekst ten był już powszechnie znany w IV i V wieku, jako że często go cytowano. W V wieku istniał też już jego przekład łaciński.
Autor Fizjologa niewątpliwie czerpał ze starożytnych dzieł dotyczących historii naturalnej (z twórczości Arystotelesa, Pliniusza Starszego, Herodota) oraz z pism wczesnochrześcijańskich. Tekst omawiał 49 zwierząt, głównie występujących w obszarach śródziemnomorskich, a także kamienie oraz rośliny. Późniejsze średniowieczne bestiariusze wzbogacone zostały opisami zwierząt występujących w Europie północnej.

Smok, miniatura z Bestiariusza z 3. ćw. XIII w., British Library w Londynie, z kodeksu Harley 3244, fol. 59


Oczywiście jedną z najważniejszych bestii opisywanych w bestiariuszach był smok. Określano go jako największego węża, którego siła kryje się głównie w ogonie, choć uznawano także, że może zatruć oddechem. W ilustracjach średniowiecznych bestiariuszy smoki zazwyczaj są skrzydlate i mają dwie lub cztery łapy; rzadko natomiast ukazywano je jako ziejące ogniem. Wierzono, że smok jest wrogiem słonia, a ponadto – że panicznie boi się słodkiego zapachu oddechu pantery.

Zwierzęta podążają za oddechem pantery, smok się chowa. Miniatura z Bestiariusza z Rochester,
Anglia, 2. ćw. XIII w., British Library w Londynie, Royal 12 F XIII, fol. 9


Pantera w wielu średniowiecznych bestiariuszach wygląda jak tęczowy pies. Teksty mówiły, że jest to piękne, wielobarwne zwierzę. Po obfitym posiłku pantera miała zasypiać na trzy dni, a po obudzeniu się wydawać z siebie ryk, który uwalniał z jej pyska słodki zapach, przyciągający wszystkie zwierzęta, a odstraszający właśnie smoka. Panterę interpretowano jako symbol Chrystusa, zaś smok był oczywiście symbolem szatana.

   
Detale arrasu Walka smoka z panterą, ok. 1555, Zamek Królewski na Wawelu, digitalizacja: RPD MIK, domena publiczna


Starożytni Grecy i Rzymianie uważali, że smoki żyją na wschodzie, zwłaszcza w Indiach – stąd też interakcje ze słoniami, opisane w Fizjologu. Pliniusz Starszy napisał, że smok znienacka rzuca się na słonia, dusi go i wypija jego krew, lecz martwy słoń upadając miażdży smoka i w efekcie oba zwierzęta giną. Ze szczątków zgniecionego smoka, którego krew zmieszała się z krwią słonia, można było według Pliniusza uzyskać niepowtarzalny barwnik, zwany „smoczą krwią”. W rzeczywistości barwnik ten sporządzano z wyciągu z żywicy niektórych drzew z rodzaju dracena (nazwa ta zresztą wywodzi się od greckiego określenia smoczycy), na przykład smokowca: endemitu Madery i Wysp Kanaryjskich. Średniowieczni malarze używali „smoczej krwi” nie tylko jako pigmentu do wyrobu czerwonej farby, ale przede wszystkim do barwienia werniksów, którymi pokrywano złocenia w obrazach czy rękopisach dla wzmocnienia ciepłej świetlistości złota; „smocza krew” bywała też składnikiem złotych farb lub po prostu barwnikiem imitującym złoto. Był to pigment kosztowny, sprowadzany do Europy wraz z egzotycznymi przyprawami i wonnościami.

Słoń i smok, miniatura z Bestiariusza z 3. ćw. XIII w., British Library w Londynie, z kodeksu Harley 3244, fol. 39v


Smok Wawelski

Wzgórze wawelskie od wieków wiązane było z legendą o smoku – być może nie jest przypadkiem, że na jego terenie rozkwitał kult świętych pogromców smoka. Oto bowiem na środku wzgórza znajdowały się w średniowieczu niezachowane do dziś kościoły pod wezwaniami św. Michała i św. Jerzego, zaś gotycką katedrę zaczęto wznosić w latach dwudziestych XIV wieku, zaczynając od kaplicy pod wezwaniem św. Małgorzaty. Dziś zachodnie wejście do katedry zdobią rzeźby wstawione w ościeża w 2. połowie XIV wieku, a pochodzące zapewne z kamiennego ołtarza z tejże kaplicy (zamienionej na zakrystię), przedstawiające św. Małgorzatę oraz św. Michała ze smokami. Zaś powyżej, także przy wejściu do katedry, wiszą kości smoka!

        
Św. Małgorzata i św. Michał Archanioł, przed 1322, rzeźby z kaplicy św. Małgorzaty (obecnie zakrystia),
wstawione w ościeża wejścia do katedry na Wawelu. Wikimedia Commons


Oczywiście w rzeczywistości to nie są kości prawdziwego smoka, lecz szczątki prehistorycznych zwierząt: mamuta, wieloryba i nosorożca włochatego. Są one świadectwem niezwykle interesującego i szeroko występującego w całej Europie zwyczaju kolekcjonowania w kościołach rozmaitych „dziwów natury”. Szczególnie popularne były szczątki kostne mamutów czy waleni, ale także kły słoni, strusie jaja oraz relikty, które uważano za rogi jednorożca. Wawelskie kości pozyskano (wykopano?) w nieznanych okolicznościach jeszcze w średniowieczu i prawdopodobnie już co najmniej od XIV wieku znajdowały się w katedrze.

Kości przy zachodnim wejściu do katedry na Wawelu. Fot. Yohan euan o4


Jakkolwiek Smoka Wawelskiego kojarzą w Polsce chyba wszyscy, to niewiele osób wie, że Dratewka nie funkcjonował w średniowiecznej legendzie – postać sprytnego szewca, który zaszył siarkę w baranią skórę pojawiła się dopiero w nowożytnych wersjach opowieści (pierwszą wzmiankę o szewcu Skubie znajdziemy w opisie herbu Abdank, w dziele Bartosza Paprockiego Herby rycerstwa polskiego z 1584 roku). Tymczasem najstarszą wersją legendy jest zapis z Kroniki (Historia Polonica) Wincentego Kadłubka (zm. 1223). Otóż według niego w jaskini żył potwór zwany olofagiem, czyli całożercą (z czego wynika, że wszystko połykał bez gryzienia), który pożerał okoliczne bydło, a jak nie dostał bydła, to zjadał ludzi. W końcu sam władca Krak wpadł na pomysł, by smokowi podrzucić siarkę, zaszytą w bydlęce skóry (nie jedną, lecz kilka). Siarka miała być podpalona, a całożerca zadusił się od połkniętych płomieni. Samą operacją zgładzenia potwora zajęli się synowie Kraka, lecz niestety młodszy z nich postanowił przy okazji pozbyć się brata; zabił go, ogłaszając, że ów zginął, walcząc ze smokiem. Gdy bratobójstwo wyszło na jaw, morderca został wygnany, a władzę przejęła córka Kraka, Wanda. Kadłubek napisał, że nazwa Kraków wzięła się od imienia Kraka (Grakcha), lecz wspomniał także, że niektórzy zwą Kraków od krakania kruków, które zleciały się do padliny smoka.

Niewątpliwie jednym ze źródeł dla Wincentego Kadłubka była biblijna opowieść z Księgi Daniela o zniszczeniu węża, czczonego przez Babilończyków (Dn 14,23-27) – w Biblii Jakuba Wujka we fragmencie tym pojawia się zdanie: „Wziął tedy Daniel smoły, sadła i sierści, i uwarzył je razem; a naczynił kołaczy, i dał w paszczę smokowi, a smok pękł”. Wincenty Kadłubek był erudytą i czerpał nie tylko z Biblii, ale także z literatury świeckiej, również klasycznej – najprawdopodobniej znał zatem legendy o Aleksandrze Wielkim. To właśnie wśród przygód Aleksandra znajdziemy opowieść o tym, że bohater ten zgładził smoka, podsuwając mu do połknięcia zaszytą w skórę woła mieszankę, składającą się z gipsu, smoły, ołowiu i siarki. Gdy smok to połknął, Aleksander rozkazał strzelać do niego rozpalonymi w ogniu kulami; dzięki temu wybuchowa mieszanka eksplodowała. Takie wyjaśnienie celu nakarmienia potwora siarką wydaje się zresztą logiczne – zabrakło go w naszej krakowskiej wersji, w której pominięto strzelanie do smoka.

Spłodzony przez smoka

Niewiele osób wie dzisiaj o tym, że w średniowieczu bardzo popularne były poematy wywodzące się z literatury antycznej. Średniowieczni miłośnicy świeckiej literatury znali Romans o Troi, napisany na podstawie dzieła Homera, Eneasza powstałego w oparciu o twórczość Wergiliusza, a przede wszystkim zaczytywali się w licznych historiach, których bohaterem był właśnie Aleksander Wielki. Redakcji tych opowiadań było wiele, powstawały one od IV aż do XVI wieku, zarówno w Europie, jak i na Bliskim Wschodzie. Najsłynniejszy poemat, zatytułowany Roman d’Alexandre, był dziełem spisanym w oparciu o różne wcześniejsze teksty przez Alexandra de Berneya, normandzkiego poetę z XII wieku. Poemat ten składa się z czterech części: pierwsza opowiada o wydarzeniach od poczęcia Aleksandra do oblężenia Tyru, druga relacjonuje zdobycie Tyru, wejście do Jerozolimy i pobicie Dariusza Perskiego, trzecia zawiera przygody Aleksandra w Indiach, zaś czwarta opisuje jego śmierć. W XIII wieku powstała wersja Aleksandra pisana prozą, a z zachowanych późnośredniowiecznych rękopisów wiele jest bogato ilustrowanych.
Wśród niesamowitych przygód bohatera trafiły się także potyczki z różnymi smokami: były takie, które miały szmaragdy na głowach, były bestie rogate, i wreszcie były smoki dwugłowe i ośmiołape, w całości pokryte oczami. Każdy z tych gatunków odnajdziemy w dekoracjach rękopisów.

Aleksander Wielki w walce ze smokami ze szmaragdami na głowach, miniatura z Le livre et la vraye hystoire du bon roy Alixandre, Paryż, ok. 1420–1425, British Library w Londynie, Royal MS 20 B XX, fol. 73

Aleksander Wielki w walce z rogatymi smokami, miniatura z Le livre et la vraye hystoire du bon roy Alixandre, Paryż, ok. 1420–1425, British Library w Londynie, Royal MS 20 B XX, fol. 78v

Aleksander Wielki w walce z dwugłowymi smokami pokrytymi oczami, miniatura z Le livre et la vraye hystoire du bon roy Alixandre, Paryż, ok. 1420–1425, British Library w Londynie, Royal MS 20 B XX, fol. 83v


Najważniejszym jednak powiązaniem Aleksandra Wielkiego ze smokiem był fakt, że… smok go spłodził! Mówiąc precyzyjniej, spłodzić go miał (w jednej z wersji legendy) sam Zeus pod postacią smoka. Opowieści o boskim pochodzeniu Aleksandra Wielkiego krążyły już w starożytności; jak zanotował grecki historyk Plutarch (zm. po 120 r.), „ludzki” ojciec Aleksandra, król Filip II Macedoński, udał się do wyroczni w Delfach po radę, gdyż miał wątpliwości odnośnie wierności swej żony Olimpias (córki króla Epiru). Widział ją bowiem, jak leżała z wężem... Od wyroczni dowiedział się, że podejrzał żonę w trakcie zbliżenia z Zeusem-Amonem (Grecy identyfikowali egipskiego Amona-Ra z Zeusem), który jest prawdziwym ojcem dziecka królowej. Za to, że podglądał boga, Filip miał stracić oko – i rzeczywiście, w 354 roku p.n.e., strzała wybiła oko Filipa podczas oblężenia greckiej kolonii Metony. W średniowiecznych rękopisach znajdziemy dość dosłowne ilustracje takiej sceny: oto królowa leży ze smokiem, a jej mąż podgląda ją przez okienko w drzwiach. 

Poczęcie Aleksandra Wielkiego, miniatura z Les faize d’Alexandre (Quintus Curtius Rufus, tłum. Vasco da Lucena), Południowe Niderlandy (Brugia?), ok. 1468–1475, British Library w Londynie, Burney 169, fol. 14


Smocza matka

Matka Aleksandra Wielkiego miała spłodzić dziecko ze smokiem, lecz mianem „smoczej matki” można chyba nazwać inną bohaterkę średniowiecznego romansu, a mianowicie Meluzynę. Najpopularniejsze wersje opowieści o tej pani powstały na przełomie XIV i XV wieku – wśród nich ważną pozycją jest tekst z 1393 roku, autorstwa Jeana d’Arras, dworzanina księcia Jeana de Berry. Oto bowiem wśród licznych zamków, które posiadał książę de Berry, był Lusignan w regionie Poitou, czyli rodowa siedziba Lusignanów, który to ród miał wywodzić się od Meluzyny i jej potomstwa. Była to księżniczka i czarodziejka; niestety w wyniku zaangażowania się w konflikt rodziców ona i jej siostry zostały obłożone klątwami. W przypadku Meluzyny klątwa polegała na tym, że w każdą sobotę od pasa w dół zamieniała się w węża. Gdy bohaterka wyszła za mąż za Raymondina (Raymonda z Poitou), wymusiła na nim obietnicę, że nigdy nie będzie jej oglądał w soboty – zamykała się wówczas w swej komnacie i zażywała kąpieli. Przez jakiś czas małżonkowie żyli zgodnie (Meluzyna urodziła Raymondinowi aż dziesięciu synów), ale w końcu mąż, podejrzewając, że żona go zdradza, odkrył jej sekret, podglądnąwszy ją w pewną sobotę przez otwór w drzwiach. Gdy Meluzyna dowiedziała się, że Raymondino złamał obietnicę, opuściła go – odleciała, przyjmując kształt smoka.

    
Zamek Lusignan, miniatura dekorująca marzec w kalendarzu Bardzo Bogatych Godzinek Księcia de Berry,
przed 1416 i po 1440 (Bracia Limbourg, dokończył Berthelemy d’Eyck?), Musée Condé w Chantilly, Ms. 65, fol. 3


W Europie Środkowej legenda o Meluzynie stała się popularna dzięki prozaicznej parafrazie na język niemiecki, zrealizowanej w 1456 roku przez Thüringa von Ringoltingena. Z niemieckiego romans ten przełożono po połowie XVI wieku najpierw na język czeski, a następnie na polski.

Godło ze smokiem

W mitologii ludów północnoeuropejskich (Wikingów, Gotów, Celtów) smoki pojawiały się jako groźne, ale i potężne bestie, strzegące skarbów i godne podziwu. Osadzone w anglosaskich legendach smoki zadomowiły się na zachodnioeuropejskich chorągwiach i w herbach, szczególnie w kręgu kultury bretońskiej. To właśnie w tam powstały niezwykle popularne w całej Europie opowieści o Królu Arturze i Rycerzach Okrągłego Stołu; sam Artur jako wspaniały władca też miał być określany mianem „smoka”. Zachodnioeuropejska kultura (w tym również legendy arturiańskie) docierała i na piastowskie dwory; zapewne głównie przez Czechy i Śląsk (czego przykładem może być cykl przygód Lancelota w malowidłach zdobiących czternastowieczną wieżę w Siedlęcinie). W takim „arturiańskim”, pozytywnym znaczeniu smok pojawił się właśnie w XIV wieku w herbach książąt czerskich (Piastów mazowieckich): Trojdena I i jego synów Siemowita III oraz Kazimierza I, i stał się godłem księstwa czerskiego. W Małopolsce natomiast znajdziemy go na przykład w herbie Nowego Żmigrodu (woj. podkarpackie), miasta na pograniczu z Rusią Halicko-Wołyńską, na szlaku z Sandomierza przez Karpaty na Węgry. Smok w kulturze słowiańskiej występował także jako „żmij” (pamiętajmy, że wedle średniowiecznych bestiariuszy smok był gigantycznym wężem), nie dziwi zatem jego obecność również w herbie dolnośląskiego Żmigrodu.

Herb Księstwa Czerskiego, Wikimedia Commons Herb Nowego Żmigrodu, Wikimedia Commons Herb Żmigrodu, Wikimedia Commons


Każda dzika bestia mogła uosabiać zło, a zarazem występować w pozytywnej roli symbolu siły i potęgi, szczególnie w kręgu świeckiej kultury rycerskiej. Smoki, lwy czy gryfy były bardzo często występującymi figurami w europejskiej heraldyce, a jako motywy zdobnicze w gotyckiej architekturze, iluminatorstwie i rzemiośle artystycznym jawią się nam jako tyleż popularne, co wieloznaczne. Gryf i lew mogą być zarówno groźnymi bestiami, jak i symbolami samego Chrystusa. Smok natomiast mógł występować pod postacią jaszczura: a z kolei jaszczurki interpretowano jako symbol duszy ludzkiej poszukującej Boga, ponieważ jaszczurka lubi wygrzewać się na słońcu. Poza tym wierzono, że oślepła jaszczurka może odzyskać wzrok, patrząc na wschodzące słońce, tak jak dusza grzesznika może uzyskać zbawienie, zwracając się ku Bogu. W Krakowie ciekawym przykładem przedstawienia dwóch gryzących się smoków lub jaszczurek jest godło kamienicy Pod Jaszczurką (przy Rynku Głównym 8).

Godło domu „Pod Jaszczurką”, XV/XVI w. (?), Muzeum Narodowe w Krakowie


Dzisiaj nad bramą tego domu znajduje się kopia, a oryginał przechowuje Muzeum Narodowe w Krakowie. Jest to rzeźba bardzo wysokiej klasy, datowana na schyłek XV wieku, powstała pod wpływem twórczości Wita Stwosza (a może nawet wykonał ją ktoś z jego warsztatu?). Znaczenie tego godła pozostaje tematem spekulacji badaczy – jak zresztą wiele elementów średniowiecznej kultury wizualnej. Całe piękno symbolu leży w jego wieloznaczności, a smoki niewątpliwie są jednym z najbardziej fascynujących tego przykładów.

Opracowanie: dr Magdalena Łanuszka
Ten utwór jest dostępny na licencji Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska.

Czytaj także: Smoki w sztuce średniowiecznej: sacrum

dr Magdalena Łanuszka – absolwentka Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie, doktor historii sztuki, mediewistka. Ma na koncie współpracę z różnymi instytucjami: w zakresie dydaktyki (wykłady m.in. dla Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego, Akademii Dziedzictwa, licznych Uniwersytetów Trzeciego Wieku), pracy badawczej (m.in. dla University of Glasgow, Polskiej Akademii Umiejętności) oraz popularyzatorskiej (m.in. dla Archiwów Państwowych, Narodowego Instytutu Muzealnictwa i Ochrony Zbiorów, Biblioteki Narodowej, Radia Kraków, Tygodnika Powszechnego). W Międzynarodowym Centrum Kultury w Krakowie administruje serwisem Art and Heritage in Central Europe oraz prowadzi lokalną redakcję RIHA Journal. Autorka bloga o poszukiwaniu ciekawostek w sztuce: www.posztukiwania.pl.

less

Jagiellonian tapestry “Dragon Fighting with a Panther”

Pictures

Links

Game

See also


Recent comments

Add comment: