List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 2011
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

The role of this object is in the play is double. On the one hand, a window opens Room of Childhood on the outside, allows the penetration of other spaces. Just as it was in the play The Dead Class (1975). The window is an unusual object that separates us from the world the other side, from» unknown «... of Death ...

more

This Window is a stage object from the performance of Cricot 2 Theatre, Wielopole, Wielopole, which premiered in Florence in June of 1980, in the building of the former convent at 25 via Santa Maria.
The Window, together with the wardrobe, bed, table, and chairs, were objects on stage, from which the artist was building a “room of the imagination“. He did not treat these objects as a stage action setting, but rather a construction referring to the mechanism of memory and memories. In the performance, Wielopole, Wielopole, the window and other stage props create the decor of the artist’s “Room of Childhood“, “recalled by memories“. Themes from his childhood in Wielopole Skrzyński, memorised by the artist, fragments of his room, the fate of the members of his family become “cliches of memory“ on the stage, along with the content of the spectacle.
In his Commentary to the score of the first act, the artist wrote: “An important WINDOW! behind it, (...) a STREET going deep inside, and at its end, A PINK TENEMENT HOUSE. My mother disappeared at this corner when she left for a long time, at this turn that was THE END OF THE WORLD“. Therefore, the window is not just a memory of the Galician town landscape, where “old Jewesses hung their cushions in the red covers“ through the windows, but also an area of experience. As the artist writes: “Because the window has many dark secrets. The window arouses fear and premonition of what is beyond“.

The role of this object is in the play is double. On the one hand, a window opens Room of Childhood on the outside, allows the penetration of other spaces. Just as it was in the play The Dead Class (1975). The window is an unusual object that separates us from the world the other side, from» unknown «... of Death ...

The window, however, which appears several times in the artist’s work, is also associated with “peeping“, “quietly and stealthily“. Peeping through the window from the outside was accompanied by the desire to cross this threshold.
The theme of the window and its mechanism of simultaneous being “here“ and “there“ appeared in the spectacle, The Dead Class, where peering through the window became an impulse to recall memories of the school’s class. In a similar way, we look through the dirty windows inside the building in the work, A school class, work closed (1983, 1985). The theme of the semi-open window was also used by the artist in Cricotage, A very short lesson (1988), and a series of paintings entitled, One shall not look through the window with impunity (1989), as well as in many drawing works from the 1960s and 1980s.
The construction of the Window is typical for the theatre objects of the spectacle. Two window units, painted with gray acrylic paint, were mounted on a metal frame, attached to a wooden platform. Plastic windows (plexiglass) were attached to the quarters. The construction of metal hinges allows the movement of the shutters, thanks to which the window can be opened and closed. As many objects from the performances of the Cricot 2 Theatre Window have installed wheels, thanks to which it became a mobile object. The Cricoteka Archives contain a technical sketch of Tadeusz Kantor precisely defining the object’s parameters.
It is also extremely important that the artist had re-used the objects—the window boxes are elements taken from reality. This is related to the idea of “the lowest rank of reality“, which Kantor consistently applied in his work.



Elaborated by Małgorzata Paluch-Cybulska (The Cricoteka Centre for the Documentation of the Art of Tadeusz Kantor), © all rights reserved

 

less

The girl from the cover

A prototype of the woman behind the window in the performance The class has died was probably a drawing by Stanisław Wyspiański, published on the cover of Interiors by Maurice Maeterlinck (1901). The sketch was created as a playbill of the poster announcing a lecture by Stanisław Przybyszewski, connected with the stage...

more

Litografia kredką: Prószyński A. w Krakowie, Wnętrze, Stanisław Wyspiański, ze zbiorów Muzeum Narodowego w Krakowie, © wszystkie prawa zastrzeżone

A prototype of the woman behind the window in the performance The class has died was probably a drawing by Stanisław Wyspiański, published on the cover of Interiors by Maurice Maeterlinck (1901). The sketch was created as a playbill of the poster announcing a lecture by Stanisław Przybyszewski, connected with the stage presentation of Maeterlinck’s drama.
Gabriela Zapolska, who, before the beginning of her literary career, performed as an actress on stage at the Warsaw Charity Society; the Municipal Theatres in Kraków, Łódź, and Poznań, played for the audience. Interestingly, the audience could then buy tickets, choosing a seat on an armchair, a chair, or the balcony (standing space).
The girl sketched by Wyspiański is looking in through the window, just like “the Woman behind the Window” in Kantor’s performance. Compare the picture above with the Window, which is in the collection of the Małopolska’s Virtual Museums.

Elaborated by Małgorzata Paluch-Cybulska ( The Cricoteka Centre for the Documentation of the Art of Tadeusz Kantor), Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums , © all rights reserved

less

Kantor’s theatre props

Theatre props/costumes/elements of scenography presented on the website are mostly incomplete objects which, although they are the key to many fascinating narratives, can hardly be examined in isolation from their staging. It is different when it comes to the objects from Tadeusz Kantor’s performances...

more

Theatre props/costumes/elements of scenography presented on the website are mostly incomplete objects which, although they are the key to many fascinating narratives, can hardly be examined in isolation from their staging. It is different when it comes to the objects from Tadeusz Kantor’s performances because they are not typical “props.” The author of The Dead Class wrote about the objects that he created in the following way:

„THEY ARE NOT THEATRE PROPS.
I HAVE EXCLUDED THIS CONCEPT FROM THE IDEA OF THE CRICOT 2 THEATRE
AS UNSUITABLE.

THESE WORKS ARE NOT THE RESULT OF THE AD HOC AND FLEETING NEEDS
 OF A GIVEN PERFORMANCE.
INSTEAD, THEY ARE CLOSELY CONNECTED WITH THE IDEAS THAT DEFINE MY
 ARTISTIC CREATION
THEY BELONG TO A SERIES OF WORKS ON A SPECIFIC SUBJECT,
LOCATED IN MUSEUMS SINCE TIME IMMEMORIAL.
THEY HAVE A SUFFICIENT QUANTITY OF INTERNAL TENSION
AND INDEPENDENT MEANING
TO
 BE AUTONOMOUS WORKS OF ART. (...)”[1]

Elaborated by Editorial team of Małopolskas Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

[1] Tadeusz Kantor’s statement regarding the objects of the Cricot 2 Theater stored in Cricoteka, author’s typescript, Cricoteka’s archives, inv. no. I/000604, p. 1.

less

“Window” (“Wielopole, Wielopole”, 1980)

Pictures


Recent comments

Add comment: