List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

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In the manor house from Droginia (moved to the Museum in Wygiełzów), in which the apartment interiors of a wealthy noble family were recreated, the more intimate side of life was also included. The bedroom, located in the alcove, equipped with 19th century furniture, also included a night-chair which served as a privy.

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In the manor house from Droginia (moved to the Museum in Wygiełzów), in which the apartment interiors of a wealthy noble family were recreated, the more intimate side of life was also included. The bedroom, located in the alcove, equipped with 19th century furniture, also included a night-chair which served as a privy. It has a low seat, enclosed, with a flap under which there is a hole, intended for a chamber pot. A door is fitted at the back, which could be opened with a key in order to replace the vessel. The chair is equipped with a high backrest with rungs, armrests and low legs. Made of wood, reduced to simple geometrical construction forms, devoid of ornamental decorations, it reflects the Biedermeier style. Biedermeier furniture was a popular furnishing style for landowners’ mansions and townhouses that belonged to the intelligentsia until the end of the 19th century.
In Poland, portable toilets like this chair were called, inter alia, a stool, a toilet or a cacatuar, a cacquet or a carafe, in French fashion. This item was located in a special separate room or was moved around the house when required. Grander versions sometimes resembled a real throne, hence perhaps the Polish term “sit on the throne,” referring to the toilet seat. The press advertised stools as “armchairs for going outside while staying inside”. Ebony wood.
 

Elaborated by Piotr Bujakiewicz (Museum — Vistula Ethnographic Park in Wygiełzów and Lipowiec Castle), © all rights reserved

Read about Biedermeier private quarters in this text by Emiliano Ranocchi Biedermeier. The birth of privacy from the Central European spirit („Autoportret. Pismo o dobrej przestrzeni”, nr 4/2007).
 

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A maze of sense and meaning

The fragment taken from Tadeusz Kantor’s Writings is an invitation.
More than 770 objects, which you will find on the portal, are also 770 stories, 770 separate yet intertwined worlds.
Małopolska’s Virtual Museums constitute a large library, which, as Umberto Eco wanted, is a place to hide (to store), but also to find; a labyrinth of various, often transient, objects and meanings. They can also be a space for the dialogue and discovery of the secret language of relics which, although once part of someone’s life, have been placed in museum collections. Now they breathe a different air – museum cabinets and storerooms...

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“List of 937 exhibits
sketches
drawings
projects
plans
ideas
definitions
analysis
manifests
albums
recipes
prescripts
records
descriptions
games
plays
landscapes
battles
metaphors
metamorphosis
wrecks
destruction
broken taxi
fears
obsessions
horizontal statues
vertical
standing
lying
cycles
specimen
perspectives
panoramas
relics
pauses
aneantyzacje [Kantor’s special artistic methods]
brikabraki [see above]
rendezvous
letters
documents
comments
assemblages,
collages,
embalmments,
and
so
on[1]

The fragment taken from Tadeusz Kantor’s Writings is an invitation.
More than 770 objects, which you will find on the portal, are also 770 stories, 770 separate yet intertwined worlds.

Małopolska’s Virtual Museums constitute a large library, which, as Umberto Eco wanted, is a place to hide (to store), but also to find; a labyrinth of various, often transient, objects and meanings. They can also be a space for the dialogue and discovery of the secret language of relics which, although once part of someone’s life, have been placed in museum collections. Now they breathe a different air – museum cabinets and storerooms.
These are sketches, drawings (such as those by Witkacy, Kantor  or Wyspiański), emanations of someone’s ideas and plans ( Mikiphone pocket phonograph, the flight board of the 308 Krakow Fighter Squadron), destruction and metamorphosis (a vase made from the shell of an artillery roundsalt haira signboard with moving fonts). Vertical figures (like St. Stanislas or Madonna from Krużlowa) and horizontal ones (Napoleon On Horseback). Unique objects (like the Vaca Muerta meteorite or skis of Adam Małysz) and ordinary-unusual objects (like a spoon-holder,a cranked butter churn or a night armchair), which successfully functioned in the homes of our great-grandmothers or great-grandparents, but with the end of the epoch discreetly went out of use.
In Kantor’s part „and so on” on the portal there are countless opportunities to explore and discover personal significance and meanings. The world of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums is just the beginning and the starting point for individual discoveries and wanderings, to which we cordially invite you.

Elaborated by: Anna Berestecka (Editorial team of Małopolskas Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.


[1] T. Kantor, Pisma, vol. I: Metamorfozy. Teksty o latach 1934–1974, Wrocław 2005, pp. 231–232.

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The place, where even the king walks on foot

Jan Długosz — describing the life and customs of King Władysław Jagiełło — stated that “depending on the circumstances, sometimes it was difficult to approach him, at other times, it was easy”. He was most accessible and accommodating to petitioners while sitting on the toilet, when he “went from his bed to a secluded place and defecated for a long time there, handling many affairs. And, apparently, he was never more accessible and gentler. And the knights strove to find such moments to make it easier for them to get what they had asked for”.

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Jan Długosz — describing the life and customs of King Władysław Jagiełło — stated that “depending on the circumstances, sometimes it was difficult to approach him, at other times, it was easy”. He was most accessible and accommodating to petitioners while sitting on the toilet, when he “went from his bed to a secluded place and defecated for a long time there, handling many affairs. And, apparently, he was never more accessible and gentler. And the knights strove to find such moments to make it easier for them to get what they had asked for”.

Sigismund I the Old, had a very different approach towards these matters and, as stated by Marcin Kromer, “throughout his life he was characterized by a great, almost virgin-like shyness. He hated it when anyone apart from those who served him in the inner-bedroom saw him naked or taking care of his natural needs”.

See: Biedermeier style night chair

Elaborated by Adam Spodaryk (Editorial team of Małopolskas

Virtual Museums),

Licencja Creative Commons

 
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.



 

 

 

Bibliography:
Piotr Węcowski, Słowa i gesty polskich Jagiellonów, [in:] Jagiellonowie i ich świat, red. Bożena Czwojdrak, Jerzy Sperka, Piotr Węcowski, Kraków 2015, pp. 13–32.

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Biedermeier style night chair

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