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This Art Nouveau dish, in the form of a bowl with a wavy irregular collar, is a very delicate and fragile object. It was handmade from glass blown on an iron rod, the so-called punty. At the bottom of the salt shaker, there is a grounded star sign visible after the cut off of the punty. Next to it, there are L. C. T. signs indicating the artist.

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This Art Nouveau dish, in the form of a bowl with a wavy irregular collar, is a very delicate and fragile object. It was handmade from glass blown on an iron rod, the so-called punty. At the bottom of the salt shaker, there is a grounded star sign visible after the cut off of the punty. Next to it, there are L. C. T. signs indicating the artist.
The salt shaker was made around 1902 in the New York-based manufacturer of the well-known creator of applied arts, Louis Comfort Tiffany, who, in 1894, patented a special type of iridescent glass – favrile. Such delicate and luxurious glass, with a beautiful metallic glow, brought his company worldwide fame at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. In 1900, they were awarded a prize at the World Exhibition in Paris, and they gained immense popularity. In the same year, vases with favrile glass found themselves in the collections of forty-three of the largest museums in the world.
The attractiveness of this precious – and very rare in Polish Art Nouveau, collections of glass – is shown in the salt shaker from Wieliczka, which, in full light, is almost transparent, and, at the same time, its metal shines. Its walls are so thin that the object can be moved even by a small gust of wind. One of the private collectors lost a similar object, which has been knocked down from the table by a curtain raised by a breeze from a slightly open window! It should be remembered that the salt shaker from Wieliczka is only 2.5 cm high with a diameter of 7 cm. This little thing takes us into the world of exquisite, refined villas and lounges belle époque. At the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries, the interiors were designed in a consistent manner of Art Nouveau along with the equipment in this style, starting with stained glass in the windows to the dresses of the lady of the house.


Elaborated by Klementyna Ochniak-Dudek (Kraków Salt Works Museum in Wieliczka), © all rights reserved

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The collection of salt shakers from Wieliczka

The Kraków Salt Works Museum has been continuously extending its collection of salt shakers from different eras and continents; currently, it has several hundred items. On our website, we present six of them, distinguished by their intricate decorations, as well as the place and time of their creation...

 

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The Kraków Salt Works Museum has been continuously extending its collection of salt shakers from different eras and continents; currently, it has several hundred items. On our website, we present six of them, distinguished by their intricate decorations, as well as the place and time of their creation:

The impressive, richly decorated salt pots, in the past belonged to the most important household utensils. They testified to the wealth of the owners. The place where the salt shaker was placed on the table during opulent feasts was strictly regulated by court ceremony. The importance and high rank of this representative container was evidenced by its impressive appearance, remaining in disproportion to the small amount of salt which it contained. Salt shakers took on yet more new shapes in the Gothic era: an hourglass, a wide container on a foot, a cylindrical casket and — at the end of the 16th century — a bell. A well-known salt shaker — made by B. Cellini on the orders of the French king Francis — had all features of sculpture. Apart from such precious models, salt shakers used every day, which prevailed at the beginning of the 17th century, became more conspicuous.


Elaborated by Kraków Salt Works Museum in Wieliczka, Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

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Glass salt shaker by Louis Comfort Tiffany

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