List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 1583
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

The document is the confirmation of the statute of the Grand Guild of Koszyce by the king, issued a year earlier by the city council, which is also presented on our website.

more

The document is the confirmation of the statute of the Grand Guild of Koszyce by the king, issued a year earlier by the city council, which is also presented on our website. A document of this rank had to be approved by the king, at that time – Stefan Batory.
A piece of parchment with a considerably damaged lesser crown seal, hung on a string made from red, white, blue and yellow silk.

Elaborated by the Stanisław Boduch Koszyce Land Museum, © all rights reserved

less

Koszyce, the royal city

The first source of information about Koszyce is contained in the data on Peter’s pence from the year 1328, where a record states: “Peter’s pence was donated jointly by the parish of Witów–Koszyce”.
A breakthrough in written sources regarding the city took place in 1374. That year, a city charter under Magdeburg law was granted to Koszyce by Elizabeth, daughter of Władysław I the Elbow-high.

more

The first source of information about Koszyce is contained in the data on Peter’s pence from the year 1328, where a record states: “Peter’s pence was donated jointly by the parish of Witów–Koszyce”.
A breakthrough in written sources regarding the city took place in 1374. That year, a city charter under Magdeburg law was granted to Koszyce by Elizabeth, daughter of Władysław I the Elbow-high.
Granting a city charter under Magdeburg law to Koszyce meant that it had already become a developed city by that time. On the one hand, the location privilege granted by Elizabeth under Magdeburg law could have been a confirmation, and, on the other hand, an extension of an earlier charter which is unknown to us. When bestowing the charter upon Koszyce, Queen Elizabeth established weekly markets on Mondays. After receiving the privileges, Koszyce became a royal free city, i.e. a state city.
It comes as a surprise that, in 1421, 47 years later, Koszyce received its second city charter under Magdeburg Law, granted by King Władysław Jagiełło. It is difficult today to provide a definite answer to the question of why Koszyce received two city charters under Magdeburg law. Two versions are considered. The first one assumes that the document from 1374 could have been lost and had to be renewed. According to the second version, the first city charter was not given by the crowned head, but by the regent who was then Elisabeth of Poland, and it was necessary that the king had it renewed.
In any case, Koszyce underwent rapid development during that time. Of significant influence, apart from the introduction of Magdeburg law, which contributed to the city’s boom, was the fact that there were three trade routes running through the royal city: the so-called royal route Kraków–Sandomierz, the Kiev route Kraków–Sandomierz–Lublin–Kiev, and the river route along the Vistula (in the town of Morsko near Koszyce, the fifth largest river port was located, from which salt from Bochnia, grain, and timber were floated down the river).
Koszyce as a city had a coat of arms, a market square, and a city hall. The coat of arms was a legal and political attribute of the city and appeared on its seal. The procedure and date of endowing the coats of arms are unknown. According to Prof. M. Gumowski, Koszyce had two coats of arms. The first one showed two baskets in a blue field. The second coat of arms showed the figure of St. Stanisław of Szczepanów in golden robes, and this type of civic identification mark appears on the seal presented on the portal.
During the initial period after the introduction of Magdeburg law, the power on behalf of the king was held by the vogt. Sources from 1382 state that the power in Koszyce was held by a vogt named Paweł, and, in 1412, they mentioned Wojciech, a village mayor from Jawiszowice, who was a town councillor. Along with the development of the city, city councillors appeared. The first information about city councillors from Koszyce dates back to 1399. Over time, the vogt’s authority was replaced by that of the mayor and city council, which held extensive authority. It could, among others, enact statutes for guilds, such as the statute of the grand guild in Koszyce presented by us, which later had to be approved by the king.
Koszyce belonged to cities with a craft and trade profile. According to the register from the end of the 17th century, there were 70 craftsmen in the town, as well as 12 traders, and 46 people were engaged in agriculture. For comparison, at that time, there were 56 craftsmen in Proszowice. This testifies to the rapid development of Koszyce, which also had its own measurement unit: i.e. 1 Koszyce bushel equalled ¼ of a Kraków bushel.
The 17th century saw a progressive decline of the Małopolska’s cities, including Koszyce. Then, along came the partitions, the Napoleonic wars (Koszyce were within the boundaries of the Duchy of Warsaw) and the January Uprising of 1863, which was important for Koszyce. The city then became a crossing point for movement of troops and weaponry, and the residents became allies of the insurgents. After the suppression of the uprising, severe repressions commenced on the tsar’s orders, who – through the Committee Ordering the Kingdom – on June 1, 1868, revoked the city rights of Koszyce and several dozen other cities. For the time being, irreversibly.

Elaborated by The Stanisław Boduch Koszyce Land Museum, © all rights reserved

See:
Seal of Koszyce

less

Guilds

The main aim of the existence of guilds was to ensure that the associated craftsmen would have exclusive rights to practice their craft in town (craftsmen who did not belong to guilds were called botchers). But the role of guilds was not limited to administrative functions...

more

The main aim of the existence of guilds was to ensure that the associated craftsmen would have exclusive rights to practice their craft in town (craftsmen who did not belong to guilds were called botchers). But the role of guilds was not limited to administrative functions (representation before the town authorities, acquiring new qualifications, ensuring standards of workmanship, caring for equal chances of sale by limiting the production and sale), the organisations also fulfilled religious and culture-forming functions.
Did you know that guilds were the courts for the first instance, resolving all disputes among craftsmen. In case of brawls, gambling, disputes connected with debts, or work outside of guilds (botchers), guilds imposed fines, which were usually paid with candles or wax.
Guild organisations still function, for example, the Polish Association of Stage Actors, although, under somewhat different names today.
In the past, a craftsman membership was obligatory; today guild associations only encourage voluntary association because thanks to this “the plant gains prestige and a craftsman does not feel lonely in the trade“. This is particularly significant when certain professions are dying out.
The mechanisation of many professions that used to be made by hand in workshops has resulted in a marginalised role of guilds and also in the disappearance of many guild rituals and celebrations.
Guilds which work to this day (there are 479 registered guilds in the structures of the Polish Craft Association) fulfil a communicative function – they settle disputes that may arise between a client and a craftsman; its members sit on examination boards before which young apprentices of the craft take a master’s exam to receive the title of master or journeyman).
The activity of guilds was not limited only to administrative and professional matters. Guild meetings and also rituals interfered in the zone of guild brothers’ spirit. Every member of the association was obliged to participate in religious rituals and ceremonies (masses, Corpus Christi processions).

Participation in ceremonies was often an occasion to show other people the affluence and wealth of a given association (banners embroidered with a gold thread were exhibited).
After the death of a guild brother, a funeral service was celebrated in a particular solemn way.
Members of guilds also founded altars, in which they placed valuable jewellery, treating them as a kind of treasury protecting them from being robbed.
Did you know that guilds were equipped with instruments of punishment, also called good advice?

Elaborated by Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

See also:
Chest of the tailors’ guild and related guilds in Kęty
Cross of tailors’ guild in Kęty
Stamp of the drapers’ guild
Obesłanie” – metal plate bearing the emblem of the grand guild of Tarnów
Welcoming cup of Sword Bearers' Guild
Manuscipt Charter of shoemakers’ guild

Read more about guilt chests.

less

Co oznacza skrót IHS?

Odpowiedzieć na pytanie postawione w tytule można bardzo prosto: to skrót od imienia Jezus – tak zwany Chrystogram, czyli monogram Chrystusa. Grecki zapis imienia: ΙΗΣΟΥΣ, skrócony do ΙΗΣ, przy użyciu łacińskiego alfabetu zamienił się w IHS. Z kolei od greckiej formy słowa „Chrystus” (ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ) powstał symbol łączący litery X i P, a także skrót XPI.
Posługiwano się nim już w czasach wczesnochrześcijańskich – bo też w ogóle pomysł skracania wyrazów jest zakorzeniony w starożytności. W sztuce chrześcijańskiej monogram Chrystusa funkcjonował także jako element dekoracyjny o sakralnym znaczeniu. Jednym z najciekawszych – moim zdaniem – przykładów jest karta ze słynnego iroszkockiego rękopisu z początków IX wieku, zwanego Księgą z Kells. Litery XPI zostały tu wplecione w taki gąszcz szalonej, plecionkowej ornamentyki, że na pierwszy rzut oka trudno je w ogóle dostrzec!

more

Odpowiedzieć na pytanie postawione w tytule można bardzo prosto: to skrót od imienia Jezus – tak zwany Chrystogram, czyli monogram Chrystusa. Grecki zapis imienia: ΙΗΣΟΥΣ, skrócony do ΙΗΣ, przy użyciu łacińskiego alfabetu zamienił się w IHS. Z kolei od greckiej formy słowa „Chrystus” (ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ) powstał symbol łączący litery X i P, a także skrót XPI.

Chrystogram, płaskorzeźba z sarkofagu z IV wieku, Muzea Watykańskie.
Wikimedia Commons
, fot. Jebulon, domena publiczna


Posługiwano się nim już w czasach wczesnochrześcijańskich – bo też w ogóle pomysł skracania wyrazów jest zakorzeniony w starożytności. W sztuce chrześcijańskiej monogram Chrystusa funkcjonował także jako element dekoracyjny o sakralnym znaczeniu. Jednym z najciekawszych – moim zdaniem – przykładów jest karta ze słynnego iroszkockiego rękopisu z początków IX wieku, zwanego Księgą z Kells. Litery XPI zostały tu wplecione w taki gąszcz szalonej, plecionkowej ornamentyki, że na pierwszy rzut oka trudno je w ogóle dostrzec! Największą część karty zajmuje asymetryczne X, pod którym zostało umieszczone P z wplecionym w środek I:

Karta 34. z Księgi z Kells, ok. 800, Trinity College Library w Dublinie, MS 58. Wikimedia Commons


Pytanie o znaczenie Chrystogramu możemy potraktować jako punkt wyjścia do rozważań o koncepcji stosowania skrótów w ogóle. Niektóre z nich, choć wykształcone w starożytności oraz średniowieczu, są w powszechnym użytku do dzisiaj.

Czy zauważyliście, że często w czasie sądowych rozpraw (szczególnie w amerykańskich filmach i serialach) protokolant pisze na malutkiej maszynie, która drukuje zapis na wąskich paskach papieru? Te urządzenia to maszyny do stenotypii, czyli do szybkiego pisania w systemie stenograficznym. W dzisiejszych czasach dysponujemy co prawda technologią pozwalającą po prostu nagrywać głos, lecz wcześniej przez wiele stuleci bieżące protokołowanie dyskusji i obrad było możliwe w zasadzie tylko dzięki technikom skróconego zapisu. Ich początki sięgają starożytności – z greki sposoby szybkiego pisania nazwano trachygrafią, a pierwszy system stworzyć miał w I wieku p.n.e. Marek Tuliusz Tyron, wyzwoleniec, przyjaciel i sekretarz Cycerona. Tak zwane noty tyrońskie składały się zazwyczaj z dwóch znaków: głównego, wywodzącego się z początku danego wyrazu, oraz posiłkowego, oznaczającego odpowiednio odmienioną końcówkę. Z kilkuset znaków szybko zrobiło się kilka tysięcy, a w średniowieczu nawet kilkanaście tysięcy! Ostatecznie jednak w stałym użytku była jedynie dość niewielka grupa najbardziej popularnych znaków.

Większość powszechnie stosowanych skrótów była jednak po prostu abrewiaturami, czyli nie w całości zapisanymi wyrazami. Zasadniczo opcje były dwie: kontrakcja lub suspensja. Takie metody skracania są zresztą stosowane do dziś. Kontrakcja polega na tym, że pomija się środkowe litery wyrazu: znakomitym przykładem jest skrót mgr oznaczający „magister”, albo dr zamiast „doktor”. Ponieważ skrót kończy się ostatnią literą słowa, w języku polskim nie dajemy na końcu kropki; ponadto końcówka zachowuje formę fleksyjną (odmieniamy zatem: dra, mgra). Tymczasem suspensja to odcięcie końcówki i zastąpienie jej kropką: tak skraca się na przykład słowo „profesor” (prof.) – z braku końcówki takiego skrótu nie odmieniamy.

Stosowanie skrótów pozwalało oszczędzić miejsce, co mogło mieć znaczenie na przykład w przypadku inskrypcji na przedmiotach lub budynkach, ale przede wszystkim ułatwiało szybkie pisanie. Ten aspekt był szczególnie istotny przy sporządzaniu protokołów, dokumentów prawnych czy też spisywaniu rachunków. Do takich celów stosowano pismo kursywne.

Akt erekcyjny króla Kazimierza Wielkiego z 4 października 1358 roku, Muzeum Niepołomickie — Zamek Królewski w Niepołomicach.
Digitalizacja: RPD MIK, domena publiczna


My dzisiaj najczęściej uważamy, że kursywa to pismo pochylone – historycznie jednak była po prostu pismem pospiesznym, a jego nazwa wywodzi się od łacińskiego czasownika curro (łac. biegnę, spieszę się, pędzę). W każdej epoce funkcjonowały pisma kursywne, najczęściej stosowane w kancelariach – dokumenty, listy i księgi spisane kursywą bywają trudne do odczytania, ponieważ owo pospieszne pismo charakteryzowało się niedbałością oraz stosowaniem dużej ilości skrótów. Od czasu do czasu zresztą władcy robili porządek w swoich kancelariach i wymuszali zmiany w kwestii używanego przez skrybów pisma. Najsłynniejszą reformą było wprowadzenie przez Karola Wielkiego czytelnego pisma zwanego minuskułą karolińską, z założeniem, że pisane nią teksty mają stosować jedynie niewielką ilość ustalonych i ściśle kontrolowanych skrótów. A jednak tak zwana młodsza rzymska kursywa (powszechnie stosowana w cesarstwie od III wieku, następczyni starszej rzymskiej kursywy) w Italii występowała nawet do XII stulecia. W końcu w 1231 roku Fryderyk Barbarossa zabronił jej stosowania, bo naprawdę było to pismo momentami niemal nieczytelne.

Fragment papirusu berlińskiego z zapisem starszą rzymską kursywą, datowanego między 41 a 54,
wg: F. Steffens, Lateinische Palaeographie, taf. 101, ed. 1906. Wikimedia Commons


Wielką oszczędnością miejsca były również tak zwane ligatury, czyli powiązanie kilku liter w jeden znak. W średniowieczu stosowano wiele rozmaitych ligatur, a niektóre z nich pozostały w użytku do dziś. Znakomitym przykładem jest stosowany w języku niemieckim znak ß, zastępujący zdwojone „s” – wydawać by się mogło, że jego forma powstała z zestawienia „s” długiego (które przypominało literę f) oraz „s” krótkiego. Tymczasem nazwa tej ligatury, czyli „Eszett”, wskazuje na to, że pierwotnie była ona połączeniem liter „s” i „z” – i faktycznie, na przykład w tekstach staropolskich pisanych pismami gotyckimi, ta właśnie ligatura zastępowała obecny w naszym języku dwuznak „sz”.

Trzeba jednak przyznać, że mistrzami ligatur w średniowieczu byli papieże: zdołali oni skleić w jedną wielką ligaturę całe dwa słowa: bene valete. Była to forma życzenia – „pozostawajcie w dobrym zdrowiu” – powszechnie używana w kancelarii papieskiej od XI wieku, najczęściej na uroczystych bullach papieskich nadających rozmaite przywileje.

Ligatura z papieskiego dokumentu Innocentego II z 1134 roku, Landesarchiv Speyer (Spira).
Wikimedia Commons


Niewątpliwie najpopularniejszą stosowaną do dziś ligaturą jest & – znak ten wywodzi się z połączenia liter „e” oraz „t” – czyli oznacza spójnik „i” (łac. et). Stosowanie ligatury ma oczywiście sens tylko w tych językach, w których spójnik ten jest słowem składającym się z co najmniej dwóch liter, a szczególnie – z trzech (jak w angielskim – and albo niemieckim – und). Po polsku zastępowanie litery „i” znakiem & jest kompletnie bez sensu – akurat w naszym języku spójnik ten wyrażony jest najwęższą literą, nie ma zatem potrzeby aby zastępować ją skrótem!

Potwierdzenie statutu Cechu Wielkiego w Koszycach wydane przez Stefana Batorego, 1578,
Muzeum Ziemi Koszyckiej im. Stanisława Boducha. Digitalizacja: RPD MIK, domena publiczna

 

Na koniec trzeba zwrócić uwagę na jeden z najbardziej intrygujących znaków, szczególnie wobec jego współczesnej popularności, a mianowicie: @. Po polsku nazywa się to małpa, po czesku – zavináč, a po angielsku at. To ostatnie wydaje się najsensowniejsze (choć czeski „zawijacz” też jest uroczy), gdyż rzeczywiście może to być ligatura łacińskiego ad („d” w średniowieczu zapisywano z laseczką pochyloną lub nawet zawijającą się w lewo). W przypadku zapisu adresu mailowego angielskie at czy też łacińskie ad tłumaczy się bardzo dobrze: kowalski@gmail.com oznacza po prostu konto osobiste Kowalskiego NA serwerze gmail.com. Szkopuł w tym, że najstarsze zachowane przykłady zastosowania tego znaku mają inne (i zupełnie różne) znaczenia: w czternastowiecznym rękopisie Kroniki Manassesa (Konstantyn Manasses był pisarzem i poetą bizantyńskim, żyjącym w XII wieku) pojawia się on jako inicjał w słowie amen, zaś w aragońskiej księdze rachunkowej z XV wieku symbolizuje jednostkę wagi zwaną arroba (w zapisie dotyczącym transportu określonej ilości zboża).

Fot. wg: Ivan Duichev, Miniatyurite na Manasievata letopis [Миниатюрите на Манасиевата летопис]
Sofia 1962. Wikimedia Commons


Tak czy inaczej, można te paleograficzne dywagacje podsumować moim ulubionym stwierdzeniem: wszystko już było w średniowieczu! A gdybyśmy byli ówczesnymi skrybami, ślęczącymi przez długie godziny nad przepisywaniem ksiąg, marznącymi w niedogrzanym klasztornym skryptorium, to także zapewne szukalibyśmy możliwości, aby tekst maksymalnie skrócić i jak najszybciej przepisać. W bardzo wielu średniowiecznych rękopisach na przestrzeni całego średniowiecza (co najmniej od początków VII wieku) znajdziemy dwuwiersz, który w najpopularniejszej wersji brzmi: Qui nescit scribere, nullum putat esse laborem, quia quo tres digiti scribunt, totus corpus laborat („Ten, kto nie potrafi pisać, sądzi, że to żadna praca, lecz choć trzy palce piszą, całe ciało pracuje”). Każdy skrót przyspieszający zakończenie takiej pracy był dla skryby prawdziwym błogosławieństwem.

Opracowanie: dr Magdalena Łanuszka
Ten utwór jest dostępny na licencji Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska.

dr Magdalena Łanuszka – absolwentka Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie, doktor historii sztuki, mediewistka. Ma na koncie współpracę z różnymi instytucjami: w zakresie dydaktyki (wykłady m.in. dla Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego, Akademii Dziedzictwa, licznych Uniwersytetów Trzeciego Wieku), pracy badawczej (m.in. dla University of Glasgow, Polskiej Akademii Umiejętności) oraz popularyzatorskiej (m.in. dla Archiwów Państwowych, Narodowego Instytutu Muzealnictwa i Ochrony Zbiorów, Biblioteki Narodowej, Radia Kraków, Tygodnika Powszechnego). W Międzynarodowym Centrum Kultury w Krakowie administruje serwisem Art and Heritage in Central Europe oraz prowadzi lokalną redakcję RIHA Journal. Autorka bloga o poszukiwaniu ciekawostek w sztuce: www.posztukiwania.pl.

Pozostałe teksty Magdaleny Łanuszki na portalu:

Modlitwa Chrystusa w Ogrójcu w realizacji Wita Stwosza
Niezwykły program dekoracji kielicha z kolekcji Muzeum Archidiecezjalnego w Krakowie
Winne opowieści – część pierwsza
Winne opowieści – część druga
Smoki w sztuce średniowiecznej: profanum
Smoki w sztuce średniowiecznej: sacrum
Średniowieczna miłość cudzołożna
Średniowieczne kobiety fatalne
Zmartwychwstanie w sztuce średniowiecznej

less

Confirmation of the statute of the Grand Guild in Koszyce issued by Stefan Batory

Pictures

Links

Game


Recent comments

Add comment: