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The Jewish wedding ring was purchased in 1985 in “Desa”. Its owner is unknown. The ring is decorated with a floral motif and a Jewish inscription, “Good luck” (“Mazel Tov”). It is topped with a model of a building — a symbolic depiction of the buildings in Jerusalem.

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The Jewish wedding ring was purchased in 1985 in “Desa”. Its owner is unknown. The ring is decorated with a floral motif and a Jewish inscription, “Mazel Tov” (“Good luck”). It is topped with a model of a building — a symbolic depiction of the buildings in Jerusalem.

Elaborated by the Irena and Mieczysław Mazaraki Museum in Chrzanów, © all rights reserved

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Remember about the temple, “Mazel Tov!”

The motif of decorating Jewish wedding rings with a model of a building appeared as early as the Middle Ages. The top represented either a house to be shared by a young married couple, or – as in the case of the ring presented on our website – a symbolic depiction of the Holy Temple of Jerusalem. The destruction of the Holy Temple is a recurring motif throughout the entire wedding ceremony.

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The motif of decorating Jewish wedding rings with a model of a building appeared as early as the Middle Ages. The top represented either a house to be shared by a young married couple, or – as in the case of the ring presented on our website – a symbolic depiction of the Holy Temple of Jerusalem. The destruction of the Holy Temple is a recurring motif throughout the entire wedding ceremony. Also, the famous custom of breaking a glass by the groom is connected with it.
The exclamation by the gathered, “Mazel Tov!” (Hebrew: מזל טוב – “Good luck!”) and the sound of breaking glass are the first associations connected with a Jewish wedding ceremony. In fact, a traditional Jewish wedding is a very solemn and joyful event with a deep spiritual significance (for a religious Jew, the joy felt because of a wedding means mitzvah, i.e. one of the religious duties). It consists of two stages: erusin and nisuin; it also has a civil and legal character. The customary breaking and subsequent crash of a wedding glass by the groom is intended to commemorate the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. This act reminds everyone that even in moments of exultation one should not forget about the destruction of Jerusalem and the desire to return to the Promised Land.

Elaborated by the editorial team of Małopolska's Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

See also:
Jewish wedding ring

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Jewish wedding ring

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Audio

Żydowski pierścień zaślubinowy odc. A Tells: Katarzyna Zimmerer
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Żydowski pierścień zaślubinowy [audiodeskrypcja] Tells: Fundacja na Rzecz Rozwoju Audiodeskrypcji KATARYNKA
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Żydowski pierścień zaślubinowy odc. B Tells: Katarzyna Zimmerer
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Marcin Grochoni
21/11/15 23:21
Interesujące

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