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The sculpture was made of polychrome and gilded lime wood. It presents the Saint in bishop’s robes, in a lively position: his body is slightly turned to the left and bent, his left leg lunged. The bishop is holding the hem of the coat in his right hand. With his left hand, he is picking up a man with a moustache from the ground, dressed in a short hooded coat and trousers, depicted in a reduced scale.

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The sculpture was made of polychrome and gilded lime wood. It presents the Saint in bishop’s robes, in a lively position: his body is slightly turned to the left and bent, his left leg lunged. The bishop is holding the hem of the coat in his right hand. With his left hand, he is picking up a man with a moustache from the ground, dressed in a short hooded coat and trousers, depicted in a reduced scale. The folds of bishop garments, sharply-edged, are quite loosely arranged, the hems of the coat as well as the mitre are ornamentally decorated. Particularly striking is a very realistic, almost portrait-like, elaboration of the face of the Saint. The back of the figure is hollow, which indicates that originally it was not a free-standing figure.
For many years it was thought that the sculpture depicts St. Stanislaus with the resurrected Komes Piotr kneeling at his feet. However, the figure of the komes is usually depicted half-naked, covered only with a shroud, whereas in this case the figure is fully dressed. Moreover, his shin is protected by a board intended to facilitate kneeling: the motif often appeared in late-Gothic depictions of beggars. Therefore, in the catalogue of the exhibition, Wokół Wita Stwosza (Around Veit Stoss), the sculpture was interpreted as the representation of St. Martin of Tours, who — due to his protective attitude towards beggars – was depicted in the company of a beggar.
The sculpture comes from a brick chapel in Młoszowa, where it perhaps found its way in the 2nd half of the 19th century. Taken from the chapel in the 1960s by the decision of the Provincial Department of Conservation in Kraków after conservation works, it was given to the collection of the museum in Chrzanów in 1969.

Elaborated by Anna Sadło-Ostafin (Irena and Mieczysław Mazaraki Museum in Chrzanów), © all rights reserved

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Sculpture “St. Stanislaus” (“St. Martin of Tours”?)

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Audio

Rzeźba „Św. Stanisław” („Św. Marcin z Tours”?) Tells: Piotr Krasny
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Rzeźba „Św. Stanisław” („Św. Marcin z Tours”?) [audiodeskrypcja] Tells: Fundacja na Rzecz Rozwoju Audiodeskrypcji KATARYNKA
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Janek
11/10/13 13:09
wow

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