List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 1304
(Votes: 3)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

The Megillat Esther binding is a case for storing a parchment scroll of the Book of Esther. The Biblical Book of Esther tells the story of how Esther, the wife of the Persian King Ahasuerus, thwarted the plans of Minister Haman aiming to annihilate the Jews who inhabited the Persian Empire. To commemorate these events, on the 14th and 15th day of the month of Adar the Jews celebrate the joyful holiday of Purim.

more

The Megillat Esther binding is a case for storing a parchment scroll of the Book of Esther. The Biblical Book of Esther tells the story of how Esther, the wife of the Persian King Ahasuerus, thwarted the plans of Minister Haman aiming to annihilate the Jews who inhabited the Persian Empire. To commemorate these events, on the 14th and 15th day of the month of Adar the Jews celebrate the joyful holiday of Purim. The Book of Esther, i.e. Megillat Esther, is a customary gift granted by a bride to her fiancé on the day of their wedding. It is usually placed in a decorated case in the shape of a cylinder, furnished inside with a movable bolt onto which a scroll is rolled with an oblong hole along the entire length of the binding. This binding was made of silver and equipped with a hexagonal handle for rolling the scroll. On the surface it bears an engraved decoration in the shape of a cartouche with a floral ornament and a meander pattern. It was made in Warsaw in Antoni Riedel’s goldsmithing workshop in 1884.

Elaborated by Anna Sadło-Ostafin, Irena and Mieczysław Mazaraki Museum in Chrzanów, © all rights reserved

less

Purim

One of the customs associated with the holiday Purim is sending each other gifts (mishloach manot), for which at least two portions of different delicacies are to be made. They may not require any additional treatment from the recipient; they must be suitable for immediate consumption.

more

One of the customs associated with the holiday Purim is sending each other gifts (mishloach manot), for which at least two portions of different delicacies are to be made. They may not require any additional treatment from the recipient; they must be suitable for immediate consumption. The most common are: cookies, fruit, grape juice, sweets, drinks, and alcohol. The gift is traditionally provided by a messenger. In the past, these types of gifts were passed on using special plates — called purim — usually made of ceramics or tin, whose mirror was usually decorated with scenes from the Book of Esther or representations of three entwined fish (meaning the constellation of Pisces in the month Adar).
On this day, generosity should be shown towards all the poor (cedaka). Fulfilling this mitzvah (matanot lewjonim) manifests itself in giving donations or presents, or funding a meal for at least two people. In this case, the dish is transferred via a middleman (szelijacha), for reasons of anonymity. Both of these commandments must be completed within one day.

Elaborated by The Irena and Mieczysław Mazaraki Museum in Chrzanów, Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

See: Jewish tin plate and also collection of judaica.

less

Megillat Esther binding

Pictures

Links

Game


Recent comments

Add comment: