List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 4528
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

Our Lady is shown as a half-figure. On her right arm we can see a baby Jesus pressing against her face. She is wearing a golden crown and her head is covered with a grey and silver scarf hemmed with gold. The coat is made in a similar design and it is additionally covered with golden lilies. Mary is grabbing the folded coat with her left hand.

more

Our Lady is shown as a half-figure. On her right arm we can see a baby Jesus pressing against her face. She is wearing a golden crown and her head is covered with a grey and silver scarf hemmed with gold. The coat is made in a similar design and it is additionally covered with golden lilies. Mary is grabbing the folded coat with her left hand. The Child is shown in the Raphael style, in a profile, with a golden crown on its head, wearing golden robes revealing his right arm and hand. The painting’s background bears transversal green stripes in brighter and darker shades.
The image was painted by Sebastian Stolarski as a copy of the miraculous painting of “Our Lady of Myślenice” made in 1611–1624 by an unknown artist not connected with Polish art circles. The painting was classified as characteristic of the late Mannerism of the 1st quarter of the 17th century.

Elaborated by Bożena Kobiałka (Museum of Independence in Myślenice), © all rights reserved

less

In the footsteps of the work of the author of “Our Lady of Myślenice”

The author of “Our Lady of Myślenice” is Sebastian Stolarski (1798-1875), a painter known in the region, whose works can be found not only in the “Greek House”, but also during a walk around Myślenice and by visiting nearby churches.
His works can be found in the parish church and on Stradom in Myślenice, as well as in churches in Wiśniowa, Zakliczyn, Trzebunia, and Skomielna Biała....

more

The author of “Our Lady of Myślenice” is Sebastian Stolarski (1798–1875), a painter known in the region, whose works can be found not only in the “Greek House”, but also during a walk around Myślenice and by visiting nearby churches.
His works can be found in the parish church and on Stradom in Myślenice, as well as in churches in Wiśniowa, Zakliczyn, Trzebunia, and Skomielna Biała. It is worth attempting thematic sightseeing of the area to search for further traces of the artist from Myślenice.
Stolarski painted on order for both the clergy and the middle class: paintings for altars, procession floats, and chapels. He also made polychromes in churches. He is known for the renovation of ancient paintings.
He returned with special fondness to copying the image of Our Mother of Myślenice, among others, on the facade of the tenement house of the Oboński family, the oldest tenement house in the Myślenice market square; his painting of Our Lady of Myslenice is to be found there. In the chapel of Saint Mary of the Snow, the so-called Studzienka, Stolarski painted a miraculous painting of Our Lady of Myślenice being transferred to the parish church and the miraculous healing in the “well”, with portraits of contemporary burghers and benefactors of the chapel (1866).
The art historian, Ewa Śnieżyńska-Stolot, evaluates Stolarski’s paintings in the following words:
 “Stolarski’s work is undoubtedly part of eclectic provincial painting. At the same time, the artist demonstrates great technical skill, which would indicate that he must have learnt his profession”.

Elaborated by Museum of Independence in Myślenice, Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

less

The wonderworking Images of the Holy Virgin

In many Polish Catholic homes, an image depicting the Holy Mary still occupies the most honourable place in the house. The belief in the miraculous power of a Marian image has survived to this day in many communities, especially rural ones. People pray to Mary every day, but also in times of danger, asking for support and protection...

more

In many Polish Catholic homes, an image depicting the Holy Mary still occupies the most honourable place in the house. The belief in the miraculous power of a Marian image has survived to this day in many communities, especially rural ones. People pray to Mary every day, but also in times of danger, asking for support and protection. In the past, miraculous images were even borrowed in a situation of illness, death, tragedy and whole families would ask for intercession in difficult times. The mother of Jesus of Nazareth, humane, protective and suffering from the loss of her son, became the closest to the folk approach to religiosity. It was through her that people turned to the fear-provoking God. And it was she who received the biggest number of representations in folk art, as well as ceremonies, holidays and sanctuaries (80% of sanctuaries in Poland are devoted precisely to the Marian cult).

It is fascinating to trace both the changes, as well as the permanent elements in Mary’s image. A careful analysis of her folk representations allows us to examine the changes in the customs prevalent in the Polish countryside. The most common way of depicting the Mother of God is to present her as a brand-new mother with the Child Jesus in her hands or in despair, with her dead son taken off the cross, in her lap. The Hodegetria (Holy Mary with the Child Jesus) and the Pietà (with dead Jesus Christ in her lap) are the most common Marian images. In both cases, she is simply a mother, first happy with her newly born child and subsequently in despair over the death of her young son. In both of these situations, she is not a great, distant figure on a pedestal, but a woman whose feelings are understandable and close, even to simpler people.

Elaborated by Editorial team of Małopolskas Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

See selected Marian images in the collection of Malopolska’s Virtual Museums:

Painting “Our Lady of Myślenice” by Sebastian Stolarski
Painting on glass “Our Lady of Ludźmierz” by Władysław Walczak-Baniecki
Icon “The Mother of God” (“Pokrow”)
Icon “Our Lady Hodegetria surrounded by prophets and saints”

less

Painting “Our Lady of Myślenice” by Sebastian Stolarski

Pictures

Audio

Obraz „Matka Boska Myślenicka” Sebastiana Stolarskiego [audiodeskrypcja] Tells: Fundacja na Rzecz Rozwoju Audiodeskrypcji KATARYNKA
play
Obraz „Matka Boska Myślenicka” Sebastiana Stolarskiego Tells: Piotr Krasny
play

Recent comments

Add comment: