List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 3337
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

Hunting arquebus with a wheel-lock, after Jan Klemens Branicki (1689–1771), the Grand Hetman of the Crown.

Old-time hunting, being an elite form of entertainment for the highest levels of society, required an adequate frame, created by, e.g., luxurious firearms. This kind of weapon was usually made from precious materials and artfully decorated in a style typical of the epoch.

more

Hunting arquebus with a wheel-lock, after Jan Klemens Branicki (1689–1771), the Grand Hetman of the Crown.

Old-time hunting, being an elite form of entertainment for the highest levels of society, required an adequate frame, created by, e.g., luxurious firearms. This kind of weapon was usually made from precious materials and artfully decorated in a style typical of the epoch. All the latest technological solutions, especially the ones which excluded mass production due to the high degree of complexity or price, were applied in its production. One of the key elements of the old firearm that was being continually improved was the lock, i.e. the mechanism intended for firing powder charge. Around 1500 the so-called wheel-lock was invented (its authorship is attributed either to Leonardo da Vinci or German gunsmiths). It was a highly precise, but very complicated and costly mechanism, and therefore it was applied mainly in luxurious guns. One type of gun that was furnished with this mechanism was the arquebus – a light gun used from the 16th to the 18th century. It had a peculiarly shaped butt and its production was dominated especially by German gunsmiths. Its stock was made of precious wood and was richly decorated with inlay work of ivory, non-ferrous metals or mother-of-pearl. The prevailing motif of the decorations were hunting scenes. The arquebus had thick-walled threaded barrels – more difficult to make, but of greater accuracy.

The specimen, part of the collection at the Museum in Tarnów, was made by the German gunsmith C. Keiner in a Czech town situated near the Bavarian border and, therefore, known under the name, Cheb or German Eger. Unfortunately, the commissioner of this beautiful firearm remains unknown, and the only trace left by its original owner is the large “SE” monogram under the crown, integrated into the decoration of the butt. The further history of the arquebus was described in the dedication engraved either in the 19th century or at the beginning of the 20th century on the trigger guard:

“After Jan Klemens Branicki

G.C. [Grand Crown] Hetman 

From Stefan Potocki

For Prince Roman Sanguszko”

Unfortunately, apart from Hetman Jan Klemens Branicki (1689–1771), the remaining persons mentioned in the inscription are far more difficult to identify. Both in the Sanguszko family and in the Potocki family there were several people bearing names that were identical to the ones mentioned and, therefore, could be distinguished exclusively by their second names, which are, unfortunately, not given here.

 

Elaborated by Łukasz Sęk (District Museum in Tarnów), © all rights reserved

less

Hunting arquebus

Pictures


Recent comments

Add comment: