List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 3086
(Votes: 3)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

The portrait of Klementyna Countess Ostrowska, of the aristocratic Sanguszko family (1786–1841), was made around 1822. The author was Vincenzo Camuccini, a famous Italian artist, professor of the Academy of St. Luke in Rome. It comes from the palace of the Sanguszko family in Gumniska where, among a rich collection of works of art, there was also a collection of family portraits.

more

The portrait of Klementyna Countess Ostrowska, of the aristocratic Sanguszko family (1786-1841), was made around 1822. The author was Vincenzo Camuccini, a famous Italian artist, professor of the Academy of St. Luke in Rome. It comes from the palace of the Sanguszko family in Gumniska where, among a rich collection of works of art, there was also a collection of family portraits.

The portrait of Ostrowska was presented to Helena Sanguszkówna in 1885, by Count Witold Aleksandrowicz. Princess Klementyna was the daughter of Janusz Modest Sanguszko and Aniela née Ledóchowska. She was also the last heiress to the Lubartów estate along with its magnificent palace, the main seat of the Sanguszko princely family. Her first husband was Władysław Tomasz Ostrowski. After the divorce, she was remarried to Napoleon Małachowski.
Intelligent, smart, and blessed with beauty, she travelled a great deal around Europe. Her trips were not limited only to “visiting the salons” of the local aristocracy. Her demeanour aroused much controversy among those surrounding her. She kept in touch with artists and was open to all novelties and inventions. She intended to rebuild the entire Lubartowski Palace, as well as change the park layout, in a new romantic style. Future generations blamed her for destroying the residence. The work was stopped due to the outbreak of the November Uprising. After the death of her husband, she left for Italy and Paris. She surrounded herself with works of high-class art. It is thanks to her that the collection of the Sanguszkos (now in the Museum in Tarnów) contains the painting by Carl Dolci, Ecce Homo. She also contributed to the publication of Adam Mickiewicz's works in Polish in Paris.
A representative portrait of Klementyna of the Sanguszkos was painted by the artist over the years 1820–1822, when she was married to Tomasz Ostrowski. The painter presented the entire figure of this woman of unique beauty sitting in an armchair, in an improvised interior. It seems that the pose, and the way in which the artist portrayed Countess Klementyna Ostrowska, had been  influenced by the person being portrayed. She is depicted wearing a dark dress revealing her arms. The head is decorated, according to the contemporary fashion, with an oriental turban, the colour of which highlights the blueness of this extraordinary lady's eyes. Beautiful jewellery, that complements the extremely tasteful dress, as well as being a testimony to the mastery of contemporary goldsmiths and the tastes of the owner, adds splendour to beauty of this woman.
Five successively presented portraits from the Tarnów museum, belong to the collection constituting the Sarmatian portrait gallery, which contains the greatest number of portraits and is the most valuable in Poland. These portraits were once part of the Podhorce gallery, which, along with the castle in Podhorce (now Ukraine), was purchased in 1865, by Prince Władysław Sanguszko from Leon Rzewuski.

Elaborated by District Museum in Tarnów, © all rights reserved

less

Painting “Portrait of Klementyna Sanguszko Ostrowska” of Vincenzo Camuccini

Pictures


Recent comments

Add comment: