List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 5142
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

This outfit, comprising the kontusz, żupan, trousers, kalpak, boots and karabela sabre, belonged to the Drohojowski Family from Czorsztyn. A full Polish national costume consists of an external part known as the kontusz and the żupan, the part which is worn underneath the kontusz.
The kontusz was made of velvet. The back was cut in a characteristic manner with the so-called pillar, flared with a system of deep pleats highlighted with the sewn-in silk haberdashery.

more

This outfit, comprising the kontusz, żupan, trousers, kalpak, boots and karabela sabre, belonged to the Drohojowski Family from Czorsztyn. A full Polish national costume consists of an external part known as the kontusz and the żupan, the part which is worn underneath the kontusz.
The kontusz was made of velvet. The back was cut in a characteristic manner with the so-called pillar, flared with a system of deep pleats highlighted with the sewn-in silk haberdashery. In the front is a clasp with three decorative loops of the same haberdashery, and eight metal buttons decorated with semi-precious stones and their imitations. The sleeve outlets are not sewn in, gathered with laid-out cuffs and lined with the same silk of which the żupan was made. On the kontusz there is a silk Słuck sash. 
The żupan worn underneath the kontusz was made of a patterned silk with a low upright collar. It is cut at the waist, well-fitting at the top and slightly broadening at the bottom. The middle back part is made of lining. It is tied with cloth-covered buttons at the front, with decorative metal buttons placed in special holes.
The inside of the kontusz and żupan feature the company’s label with the following inscription: K. Kropiowski and K. Matlas in Lviv. The entire outfit also includes the following: velvet trousers, velvet kalpak with a fur rim and a tassel of heron feathers embedded in the brass clasp, leather top boots, karabela sabre in a sheath made from an imitation of lizard leather, decorated with a silver shield featuring the Korczak coat of arms with jewel and mantling and a silver hilt shaped as a lion’s head. 
The Polish kontusz outfit was shaped over the centuries to reach the final appearance of the national costume commonly known as a kontusz in the mid-18th century. In the 19th century, kontusz outfits still enjoyed great popularity. They were often worn even at the beginning of the 20th century. They were sewn for the occasion of weddings, foreign trips, and nobility nominations. These outfits were obligatorily worn by participants of the sessions of the National Sejm in Lviv and the Viennese Parliament.

Elaborated by Beata Słotowa, PhD (The National Museum in Kraków), © all rights reserved

less

Kontusz sash and opasek

Kontusz sash was considered to be the most colourful piece of gentry dress. The sash was popular since the mid-16th century, but it gained particular significance in the 18th century (it was also then that the tying of the sash changed in a way to highlight its ends).

more

Kontusz sash was considered to be the most colourful piece of gentry dress. The sash was popular since the mid-16th century, but it gained particular significance in the 18th century (it was also then that the tying of the sash changed in a way to highlight its ends).
Initially, the gentry used imported Persian and Turkish sashes, obviously priced very high (the equivalent of today’s PLN 250).
Over time, the sashes came to be produced in Poland, initially with imported looms and materials, the Eastern sashes serving as models. The first workshops were set up in the 1740s in estate manors – in Brody and in Stanisławów, where Armenian weavers were settling in.
The Słuck-based workshop in the Radziwiłłowski estate (managed by Jan Madżarski) quickly became the most famous Polish workshop producing fabrics woven with Persian and Turkish methods. Soon, products from Słuck weavers became so popular that the Słuck sash became a synonym for the Polish sash in general. The brand was well identifiable thanks to its original patterns and compositions (the collection of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums includes a Słuck Kontusz sash from the collection of the National Museum in Kraków).

One sash has two heads.

The ends of the sash shown off were referred to as heads. Thus each sash has two heads…
Sashes were usually 3 metres long, their width reaching 40 cm.
Two ends featured identical embroidery, though with different colouring (just as in the case of the Słuck sash, sash ends were like the negative and the positive).
Additionally, colours applied on one half were used on the other half in an opposite order, which resulted in a four-sided system. Folded lengthwise, the sash turned into four different sashes. Edges of the fabric were adorned with a decorative border, which encircled both the heads and the middle part of the sash.

Where did this sash idea come from?

A sash on a nobleman's żupan played the role of a gem: a special technique was developed to press golden and silver threads to give the gold-laced sash a mirror-like look, such fabrics were most sought-after.
Although the wide variety of patterns evidenced Persian masters' creativity, sash heads usually only had a karumfil (Turkish: two branched carnations). Interestingly enough, even though the patterns were of Persian-Turkish-Armenian origin, they quickly became regarded as typically Polish, representative of the national style.
As a result, the nobility dress stood out among the European styles of the time. This distinctness was evident during foreign visits: one of such events being recorded in drawings by Stefano Della Bella, who reproduced a trip of Polish MPs in the 17th century with great detail.
The history of fashion follows traces of interpenetrating influences. The kontusz sashes were a typical piece of a nobleman’s attire, just as the broad opasek shepherd belts in the peasantry (opaska bacowska).

See the sculpture of a highlander with an opasek from the collection of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums.
Find out more about the opasek in the Bronowice costume.

Activity:
Name the elements of the Słuck sash by using the words included in the phrase below.
A sash encircled with a decorative board still has two heads.

Elaborated by Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

 

less

Kontusz style outfit

Pictures

Audio

Ubiór kontuszowy Tells: Piotr Krasny
play
Ubiór kontuszowy [audiodeskrypcja] Tells: Fundacja na Rzecz Rozwoju Audiodeskrypcji KATARYNKA
play

Recent comments

Add comment: