List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 4917
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

The Observer Badge (Navigator Badge) is one of the aviation’s specialty badges, worn by pilots and other members of the flying staff. The popular gapa is one of the most famous symbols of the Polish Military Aviation. The badge was worn by aviators in the inter-war period and the Polish Air Force during World War II. The design of the badge has survived from the time of the People’s Republic of Poland and is worn by Polish aviators to this day.

more

The Observer Badge (Navigator Badge) is one of the aviation’s specialty badges, worn by pilots and other members of the flying staff. The popular gapa is one of the most famous symbols of the Polish Military Aviation. The badge was worn by aviators in the inter-war period and the Polish Air Force during World War II. The design of the badge has survived from the time of the People’s Republic of Poland and is worn by Polish aviators to this day.
The museum exhibit is a special specimen of the Observer Badge made of gold that had been awarded to one of the best graduates of the Polish Air Force Academy in Dęblin, the famous “School of the Eaglets.” The badge is a symbol of the high quality of training that aviators received in the Second Republic of Poland. The perfectly trained pilots were considered some of the best aviators in the world, as demonstrated during World War II.
Aleksander Kremieniecki was a fresh graduate of the Academy awarded with this special specimen of the Observer Badge. In 1932 he completed his course in pilotage; in 1933 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant; and in 1934 he became a test pilot. Lieutenant Pilot A. Kremieniecki died in 1935 while navigating a prototype PZL.23 Karaś aircraft.
The badge represents an eagle flying straight ahead, with a laurel wreath in its beak and three lightning strokes (sparks, shots) shooting out of its claws. The wings feature lugs to which the aviator could attach a chain with a pin, which in turn was used to hang the badge. On the back of the badge is a metal bar and a screw cap, both used to attach the badge to the uniform.
The screw cap features the producer’s inscription: J. Knedler | Warszawa N. Świat 45 [J. Knedler | Warsaw N. Świat 45]. The Warsaw engraver Jan Knedler was one of the most eminent producers of military badges. On the backside of the badge you can see the number of the badge: 738 and a hand-engraved inscription: Czwartemu absolwentowi Szk. Pchor. Lot. w r. 1930 | Szef Deptu [Departamentu] Aeronautyki [For the fourth graduate of the Polish Air Force Academy in 1930 | Head of the Aeronautics Department]. Below is the hallmark and stamp of the producer, “J. Knedler.” This specific badge was made of gold, but a typical badge was made of bronze, awarded to a graduate of the Polish Air Force Academy upon their passing the theoretical and practical air navigator exams. What distinguished the Observer Badge from badges awarded for other specialties was the motif of lightning strokes (sparks). At the time of the badge’s production, the navigator’s duties included the operation of a spark-gap transmitter (an old type of a radio transmitter).
It is one of two badges of this kind kept at Polish museums.

Elaborated by Dawid Karamon (Polish Aviation Museum in Krakow), © all rights reserved

less

Rodin and Matejko – inspirations for industrial designers and the navigator badge

The history of the navigator badge dates back to 1918 and the rebirth of the Republic of Poland. As a result of Poland's having recovered its independence, new symbols, official forms and badges had to be designed. This mission was entrusted to artists – industrial designers...

more

The history of the navigator badge dates back to 1918 and the rebirth of the Republic of Poland. As a result of Poland's having recovered its independence, new symbols, official forms and badges had to be designed. This mission was entrusted to artists – industrial designers.
This also applies to the aviation badge. Initially, Polish pilots carried aviation badges of the occupying states. The task of designing a new model of the badge was assigned to a sculptor and medal maker, Władysław Gruberski (1873−1932), professor at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.
Gruberski was an acclaimed artist of his time with many commemorative badges, medals and sculptures to his credit. He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków. While in Paris, he was influenced by August Rodin, a great French sculptor of the era of Impressionism and Symbolism. A direct inspiration behind the design of the badge was probably the painting from the hall of the Lviv Polytechnic, made in accordance to Jan Matejko’s sketch that featured, among others, an eagle with a laurel wreath in its beak. The badge was approved on 19 February 1919 by order no. 24/19, signed by Colonel Jan Wroczyński, head of the Ministry of Military Affairs. Many variants and classes of the badge for various aviation specialties followed, but all of them share Gruberski’s eagle motif. Interestingly enough, design was not the only passion for the professor − he was also known as an Olympian. Between 1912 and 1948, the Olympics featured an Olympic Art and Literature Competition for writers, architects and artists. Władysław Gruberski was a member of the Polish Artists Representation at the 9th Olympic Games in Amsterdam in 1928.

Elaborated by Dawid Karamon (Polish Aviation Museum in Kraków), Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

See which artists whose works are presented in Małopolska’s Virtual Museums took inspiration from August Rodin’s work.

less

Navigator badge

Pictures


Recent comments

Add comment: