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The Bar-Lock typewriter is a patented design by the inventor and lawyer Charles Spiro in 1888. The presented model 10, was produced from 1900, under the brand Columbia Bar-Lock (in the United States) and Royal Bar-Lock in the British market. The keyboard used in the presented model is full, provided with 78 typing keys and one function key. The keyboard, constructed in this way, was adapted to English characters. For the needs of the non-English market, machines were produced with a set of 86 keys and only under the Royal Bar-Lock brand.

 

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The Bar-Lock typewriter is a patented design by the inventor and lawyer Charles Spiro in 1888. The presented model 10, was produced from 1900, under the brand Columbia Bar-Lock (in the United States) and Royal Bar-Lock in the British market. The keyboard used in the presented model is full, provided with 78 typing keys and one function key. The keyboard, constructed in this way, was adapted to English characters. For the needs of the non-English market, machines were produced with a set of 86 keys and only under the Royal Bar-Lock brand. The presented specimen was thus probably individually imported from the USA and adapted to the Polish font; perhaps this is related to the decal of the Kraków company Aksman, placed on the basket cover. The model 10 uses a mechanism for imprinting characters on the paper on the roller from the top, which ensured the visibility of the writing as you type. The roller was somewhat obscured by the lever basket and its cover; this could make it difficult to see, but the characteristic typewriters used at the time — with the table tops lower than the desk — reduced the effort of the hands and provided an oblique view from the top to the machine, suitable for a person with short stature. The full keyboard was characterized by a set of keys for all writing symbols; one font on each lever corresponded to this. Although it seems a bit complicated, this was simpler, because it did not require a mechanism to change the register of uppercase and lowercase letters, necessary in two-register machines. Full keyboards were commonly made with black and white diversification of keyboards for lowercase and uppercase letters. Top stamping was not usually connected to the full keyboard: machines with top stamping could have three-register keyboards, such as the British imperial or German rofa; single-entry machines could have a mechanism, for example, with a bottom stamping, such as the American caligraph: the first serial machine with a full keyboard, produced since 1880, constructed by George Yost.

Elaborated by the Municipal Engineering Museum, © all rights reserved

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Typewriter “Columbia Bar-Lock”

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