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Only a few of those who have visited the museum in Kęty are able to determine what the presented object was designed for. It is similar in shape to tea brewers, which were popular until recently, but its considerable size excludes this function. The device dates back to the 2nd half of the 19th century...

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Only a few of those who have visited the museum in Kęty are able to determine what the presented object was designed for. It is similar in shape to tea brewers, which were popular until recently, but its considerable size excludes this function. The device dates back to the 2nd half of the 19th century, the time when coffee, entering middle-class living rooms, was winning over more and more enthusiasts. At that time, it was sold in a form rarely seen today, namely in the form of unroasted coffee beans, which had to be roasted before grinding.
The metal construction, which consists of a mesh sphere (raw coffee beans were poured into it) and a sphere made of sheet metal covering the mesh ball, allowed one not only to roast the beans but also to separate them from coffee husks and other contaminants. After pouring the coffee, the locked sphere was placed over a fire; the turning of the mesh ball allowed one to roast all the beans evenly. Then they were ground by hand in a coffee-grinder and an aromatic beverage was brewed.
According to the Lviv paper Przyjaciel Domowy (Home Friend) from 1872, the coffee roaster was offered in three sizes at that time: half-pound, one-pound and two-pound (1 pound = 0.405 kg). Its price differed, depending on the size; the cheapest one cost 2 guldens 85 kreuzers, while the biggest one cost as much as 6 guldens 60 kreuzers.
The device disappeared when roasted coffee started to be sold. But it was also used for other purposes, for example, to easily prepare chicory coffee still today.
The device consists of a spherical wire mesh which has an opening on its side to pour in raw coffee and empty roasted coffee. The sphere is equipped with a hemisphere made of sheet metal, to which a handle is attached. Brewing coffee was carried out over an open fire by setting the spherical part in motion.

Elaborated by the Aleksander Kłosiński Museum in Kęty, © all rights reserved

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From the crisis of Kraków tea to coffee from the Pluton roasting plant

The tradition of drinking coffee in Poland dates back to the 17th century (though initially a lot of people showed distrust towards it).
In noble houses and manors, consuming this beverage was a sort of ritual — the green coffee beans were bought, then they were roasted in special devices, brewed in melting-pots, and served in cups...

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The tradition of drinking coffee in Poland dates back to the 17th century (though initially a lot of people showed distrust towards it).
In noble houses and manors, consuming this beverage was a sort of ritual — the green coffee beans were bought, then they were roasted in special devices, brewed in melting-pots, and served in cups. To this end, among highly qualified servants, not only medicine-maids were employed but also coffee-maids, who took care of the condition of coffee utensils and guaranteed the highest quality of the served beverage.
By the turn of the 20th century, every house was equipped with a coffee roaster.
Coffee devices started to fall into oblivion among others thanks to Tadeusz Tarasiewicz’s entrepreneurship. The failure of his first idea also indirectly contributed to it; Tarasiewicz resigned from his post of director of the Galician Bank in order to set up a shop with tea in Kraków. But the enterprise did not provide the expected profits; what is more, it turned out to be a complete disaster.
In 1882, Tarasiewicz moved to Warsaw where he set up another, innovative for those times, enterprise – the Pluton coffee roasting plant, the first one in Poland.
Initially, he had difficulties persuading clients to buy pre-roasted coffee (the volume of coffee decreased in the process of roasting, and because of that it seemed to be more expensive than the one prepared at home on a frying pan). As Kordian Tarasiewicz (the founder’s grandson) mentioned in a conversation with Jakub Kowalski in Tygodnik Powszechny [General Weekly], the new place also aroused curiosity – people lined up at the door in order to smell the intensive aroma of coffee, which they could not get at home.
Finally, the success of Pluton affected the change of habits. Roasted and ground coffee shortened the process of preparing this beverage and settled on shop shelves permanently. Green coffee beans disappeared from the market for many years. Today, we can buy them again (but this time they are much more expensive) and roasting at home has become popular among people who value the slow process.

Elaborated by Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

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Coffee made from acorns

Coffee is not always a beverage prepared from cocoa beans. Cereal grains (chicory) and even less obvious ingredients like acorns are also used to make coffee. In Obyczaje w Polsce od Średniowiecza do czasów współczesnych, Lidia Korczak writes about coffee prepared from broad beans, wheat or roasted peas...

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Coffee is not always a beverage prepared from cocoa beans. Cereal grains (chicory) and even less obvious ingredients like acorns are also used to make coffee. In Obyczaje w Polsce od Średniowiecza do czasów współczesnych, Lidia Korczak writes about coffee prepared from broad beans, wheat or roasted peas.

Acorn coffee was most popular in the pre-war years and during the World War II when substitutes for the black beverage were particularly valuable.

Today, acorn coffee is making a comeback as an alternative to natural coffee. It is available in eco-friendly shops. Acorn coffee from the Bug river region has even been entered into the regional products register.

Elaborated by Editorial team of Małopolskas Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

See: 
Device — coffee roaster
Coffee grinder

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Coffee with almond milk

In Poland, in the 19th century, the habit of drinking coffee with almond milk was adopted. The very thought of coffee served in this way stimulates the imagination (taste, smell). Although nowadays hardly anyone prepares coffee in this way...

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In Poland, in the 19th century, the habit of drinking coffee with almond milk was adopted. The very thought of coffee served in this way stimulates the imagination (taste, smell). Although nowadays hardly anyone prepares coffee in this way (it is easier to buy coffee with an almond aroma in a store or in a coffee roasting shop), such milk can easily be prepared at home.
Just soak peeled almonds or flaked almonds in boiled or mineral water (in a proportion of one glass of almonds – about 150 g – to three glasses of water) and leave it overnight. Then pour the water off, mix the almonds in a blender with three glasses of fresh water, add one more glass, then drain the liquid through a piece of gauze and it’s ready! The almond mass can be used as cheese or as one of the ingredients for a cake. You can also make a homemade marzipan by adding sugar (in the proportion of 40–30%). To make the mass stick together more easily, add a few drops of almond oil, rose water or, for example, amaretto.
The milk prepared in this way can be stored in a glass bottle for several (preferably two) days. Marzipan, due to its unique flavour, will probably be used up much quicker.

Read also how acorn coffee was prepared and how the first coffee roasting plants were created in Poland.
 

Elaborated by Editorial team of Małopolskas Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.



 

 

See: 
Device — coffee roaster
Coffee grinder
Coffee pot

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Kawa — szkaradna trucizna i jady

Zanim Polacy docenili smak kawy, stosunkowali się względem niej raczej negatywnie, czego wynikiem są różne komentarze. Warto tu przytoczyć pierwszą znaną w literaturze opinię Andrzeja Morsztyna, który wspominał: „W Malcie-śmy, pomnę, kosztowali kafy...

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Zanim Polacy docenili smak kawy, stosunkowali się względem niej raczej negatywnie, czego wynikiem są różne komentarze. Warto tu przytoczyć pierwszą znaną w literaturze opinię Andrzeja Morsztyna, który wspominał:
„W Malcie-śmy, pomnę, kosztowali kafy,
Trunku dla Turków... Ale tak szkarady
Napój, tak brzydka trucizna i jady,
Co żadnej śliny nie puszcza za zęby,
Niech chrześcijańskiej nie plugawią gęby...”[1].

Opracowanie: Redakcja WMM,
Licencja Creative Commons

 Ten utwór jest dostępny na licencji Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska.

Zobacz też:
Piecek do palenia kawy

Młynek do kawy
Dzbanek do kawy
Serwis kawowy projektu Stanisława Witkiewicza
Przeczytaj więcej o kawie palonej, która zastąpiła przygotowywane w domu ziarna.


[1] Gloger Zygmunt, Encyklopedia staropolska: http://literat.ug.edu.pl/glogers/0021.htm

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Device — coffee roaster

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Piecek do palenia kawy odc. B Tells: Wojciech Nowicki
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Piecek do palenia kawy [audiodeskrypcja] Tells: Fundacja na Rzecz Rozwoju Audiodeskrypcji KATARYNKA
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Piecek do palenia kawy odc. A Tells: Wojciech Nowicki
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