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One of the rooms in a barn is traditionally called a mow (sąsiek). In this case, the name refers to a wooden chest, usually situated in a hall or in a chamber behind a hall, which was designed for keeping grains for sowing. A chest belonging to the collection of the Museum in Kęty is typical of southern Poland. Inside the chest are two chambers for two types of grain. 

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One of the rooms in a barn is traditionally called a mow (sąsiek). In this case, the name refers to a wooden chest, usually situated in a hall or in a chamber behind a hall, which was designed for keeping grains for sowing. A chest belonging to the collection of the Museum in Kęty is typical of southern Poland. Inside the chest are two chambers for two types of grain.
Because grain was very valuable, a corn chest had to meet peculiar requirements. The wood used to make it was carefully chosen. Before being put together, the elements were boiled in lye solution, which was obtained by pouring grass ash or ash from the wood of deciduous trees like beech, into boiling water (a similar mixture was used for washing a hundred years ago). Such a procedure allowed one to protect the wood and grains from insects. It also helped preserve many old corn chests until contemporary times.
The 19th-century chest is made of wood, and the wrought staple fixed with a leather strap and a handle blocking a staple are its only metal elements. The chest is made of four vertical posts, joined with wide slats at the bottom and at the top. They form frames, whose surfaces are filled with vertical slats joined like a shingle on a roof; the planed edge of one plank goes into a groove in the ridge of the second one. The lid of the chest is made in a similar way. The corn chest from the Kęty Museum was conserved in 1977.

Elaborated by the Aleksander Kłosiński Museum in Kęty, © all rights reserved

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Corn chest — “sąsiek”

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