List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 3604
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

A funny puppet representing Jacek Malczewski in a caricatural character of Jacek Symbolewski was purchased for the collection of the Historical Museum of the City of Kraków in 1962. It makes a valuable reminder related with the Young Poland cabaret called “Zielony Balonik” (”Green Balloon”) operating in the period from 1905 to 1912 on Floriańska Street in Kraków in the Cukiernia Lwowska (Lviv Confectionery) opened by Jan Apolinary Michalik and hence called “Jama Michalika” (”Michalik’s Den”).

more

A funny puppet representing Jacek Malczewski in a caricatural character of Jacek Symbolewski was purchased for the collection of the Historical Museum of the City of Kraków in 1962. It makes a valuable reminder related with the Young Poland cabaret called “Zielony Balonik” (“Green Balloon”) operating in the period from 1905 to 1912 on Floriańska Street in Kraków in the Cukiernia Lwowska (Lviv Confectionery) opened by Jan Apolinary Michalik and hence called “Jama Michalika” (”Michalik’s Den”). The puppet comes from the famous nativity play of 1911, staged in the newly-restored Michalik’s confectionery, the interior of which was designed by Karol Frycz. This is how the play was described by Tadeusz Boy-Żeleński, its animator and co-author:
“And we came up with the idea of making a nativity play (szopka) there, with a totally new text and new figures; and to stage it not only once, as it had happened in the past, but for a public with tickets and for as many times as possible! The demon of greed already entered our hearts. We got down to work with an enthusiasm not seen in a long time. A faded nativity scene was thus restored, shining with all the colours of the rainbow; it was furnished with modern lighting installations. The puppets were made by Szczepkowski and Kunzek, several puppets—real masterpieces—were made by Puszet [Ludwik Puget]. Me and Nos [Witold Noskowski], with the frequent participation of Teofil [Trzciński], got down to writing the texts.”  (T. Boy-Żeleński, O Szopce krakowskiej „Zielonego Balonika” [About the Kraków Szopka of the Zielony Balonik Cabaret”] [in:] idem, O Krakowie [On Kraków], Kraków 1974, p. 491).
The numerous characters appearing as puppets in the nativity play included, e.g., Julian Fałat, the rector of the Academy of Fine Arts; Stanisław Badeni, the Marshal of the Parliament; Aleksander Bandrowski, a singer; professor Jerzy Mycielski, mayor Juliusz Leo, Teofil Trzciński, Feliks Manggha Jasieński, Leon Wyczółkowski, count Stanisław Tarnowski as well as Jacek Malczewski — a symbolist painter. It is the puppet representing Malczewski, called Jacek Symbolewski by the authors, that belongs to the most valuable exhibits related with the ”Zielony Balonik” nativity play from the collection of the Historical Museum of the City of Kraków. The full-figure sculpture of the head is a faithful portrait of the artist, while the body—half man, half satyr with goat horns and a tail, dressed in a brown jacket and a silver armour instead of a waistcoat—perfectly reflects the atmosphere of the artistic world created by Jacek Malczewski, attired in mysterious, symbolical costumes. The fragment of the text put into the mouth of Jacek Symbolewski in the nativity play ideally complements the accurate description of the painter, combined with a somewhat malicious evaluation of his work:

(...) I can see a perfect model.
Here comes Trzciński, with a beard like Chochoł from the wedding.
I shall make him a young brave Cossack:
Letting out a swarm of hummingbirds from a coop,
A plain man with canvas trousers.
The Kraków meadows in the background
With the Munich Philharmonic.
A Hussar drinking honey to Icek,
And Selma Kurz in a Bronowice costume as the host.

The climate of gentle satire and funny caricature, characteristic of the ”Zielony Balonik” cabaret can also be found in other figures coming from this historic Kraków nativity play of 1911. The puppets representing Teofil Trzciński, Tadeusz Boy-Żeleński, Jerzy Mycielski and Juliusz Leo are kept in the collection of the Historical Museum of the City of Kraków.

Elaborated by Małgorzata Palka (Historical Museum of the City of Kraków), © all rights reserved

less

The legend of the “Zielony Balonik” cabaret

The originator of the idea of creating an artistic cabaret was Jan August Kisielewski, after his return from Paris. Cukiernia Lwowska (Lviv Confectionery), run by Jan Michalik, was a meeting place for the Kraków bohemians to which belonged students and graduates of the Academy...

more

The originator of the idea of creating an artistic cabaret was Jan August Kisielewski, after his return from Paris. Cukiernia Lwowska (Lviv Confectionery), run by Jan Michalik, was a meeting place for the Kraków bohemians to which belonged students and graduates of the Academy of Fine arts, who gathered at one of the tables.
The creation of the Zielony Balonik cabaret would not have been possible were it not for the favourable circumstances providing fertile ground for this initiative. One of the factors heralding the breath of fresh air was the transformation of the School of Fine Arts into the Academy of Fine Arts after the death of Jan Matejko, as well as the new cadre of professors, including Wyczółkowski, Axentowicz and Pankiewicz. Equally important for the Kraków bohemians was the previous emergence of Wyspiański and the activity of Przybyszewski. All these destroyed the image of a sleepy and venerable Kraków, seen through the conservatism represented by Stanisław Tarnowski, the then rector of the Jagiellonian University and president of the Polish Academy of Learning, who was frequently dubbed the pope of Kraków due to his conservative views.
The tradition of the Kraków nativity scenes, animated by bricklayers from Krowodrza who remained unemployed during the wintertime, inspired the Kraków bohemians, who saw in it the best inspiration for their cabaret. The building of the nativity scene, being a replica of the church in Modlnica, was made by young painters and artists: Kamocki, Frycz, Czajkowski brothers, Tadeusz Rychter, Szczygliński, Wojtkiewicz, Rzecki, Kuczborski.
The puppets were sculpted by Jan Szczepkowski together with the sculptor and ophthalmologist, Dr. Brudzewski. The costumes for the puppets were designed by their wives. The whole process of creation was supervised by the author of the texts – Witold Noskowski. When the work was finished, the artists brought the nativity scene to Michalik's confectionery.
As Boy-Żeleński mentioned, The view of the construction, grand in size and of beauty far exceeding all the nativity scenes made by bricklayers, caused a stir among Kraków «andrusy» (pranksters). One could also hear murmurs of discontent because of this unexpected «competition»(Boy o Krakowie [Boy about Kraków], Kraków 1968, p. 485).
The subjects of the nativity scene were current affairs, widely discussed in the press: the need for revitalisation of the Wawel, conflicts between Manggha Jasieński and Wilhelm Feldman, the voices of Bujdowa. Leo, the then mayor of Kraków, was portrayed in the nativity scene as Herod.
The task of animating the puppets was taken on by Józef Czajkowski and Alfons Karpiński (later replaced by Puszet).
The first nativity play — staged in 1906 — was met with a euphoric reception. Sharp comments and witty ripostes were a novelty in the sleepy atmosphere of Kraków. Although the public was small (the room of the confectionery could hold no more than 100–120 people), initially the performance was not repeated. Only the last two nativity plays (the fourth and the fifth one) were staged several times and appeared also in print.
Boy-Żeleński joined the cabaret upon the realisation of the second nativity play (he began to write texts together with Noskowski).
The gallery of characters, apart from Leo, included also the puppet of Feliks Manggha Jasieński, Wilhelm Feldman, Bujwidowa, Stanisławski and Miciński.
The third nativity play was staged in the Hotel pod Różą(Under the Rose Hotel); this was due to a conflict which arouse between the artists and the owner of the confectionery. It was also necessary to create new puppets, and this task was conferred on Henryk Kunzek. Previously, only folk tunes were used; this time motifs derived from opera arias were also employed.
After the third nativity play there came a two-year break. The change was sparked by the proposal from the owner of Jama Michalika who enlarged his confectionery, hence the venue could hold more guests.
The fourth nativity play to be staged and simultaneously the first one to be sponsored by Michalik (all the previous performances were organised spontaneously thanks to the engagement of the artists) was furnished with new lights and several new puppets of Szczepkowski, Kunzek, Litwin and Herbaczewski.
Admission fees were introduced for the first time and the nativity play was staged 13 times! Teofil Trzciński protested against a higher number of performances, as each time for three hours he had to sing and animate the nativity scene characters — this time the play had 30 puppets (and each time Trzciński, with real virtuosity, imitated both the male as well as female voices).
The last nativity play to be staged in Jama Michalika was presented in 1912; the activities of the Kraków artists, however, inspired others — nativity plays began to appear in other cities.
As Boy-Żeleński put it: The «Zielony Balonik» cabaret was the first collective burst of laughter to be heard in Poland from time immemorial; it was then no surprise that the laughter turned out to be epidemic. The wave of imitation spread: in Warsaw «Momus», in Lviv various «Wesołe Jamy» (Jolly Dens), «Ule» (Beehives), etc. Different varieties of nativity plays were spreading: of a Poznań style, Tarnów style, Lviv style, Paris style, etc. There was virtually no town in Galicia in which a small group of young intelligentsia would not try to create their own «cabaret», which obviously usually led to conflicts, quarrels, etc. (p. 505).

Cabaret in Jasło
Is singing rhythmically today
That schnitzels at collectors
Are not fried in butter;
Cabaret in Sędziszów
Shall tell you from the stage
What Lady Counsellor
Does with a younger judge (…) – this is how we ridiculed this epidemic of cabarets in «Zielony Balonik». (p. 506).

The fact that the archbishop of Lviv in his Great Lent sermon preached against the cabaretisation in which he saw the source of moral corruption of citizens shows how strong this cabaret epidemic was.
The youth even collected signatures under the open letter entitled Down with Cabaret, which, among others, included the following appeal: Let us defend our hearts before the desecration, let us defend peace and honour of individuals, whipped to the wild delight of unruly crowds (p. 506).
In Kraków there were also numerous critical voices. Distinguished and devout matrons spread gossip about orgies and naked dances, indecent behaviours and situations with the participation of guests to the cabaret evenings.
Despite those unfavourable opinions circulating in the city, for many people the cabaret was a valve, creating a counter-balance for the stifling atmosphere of Kraków.

What did the cabaret evenings look like?

The meetings were usually held after the theatrical premieres, for the preparation of which there were only several weeks. The evening began at midnight and often lasted until three o'clock. The end of the artistic part, however, did not mean the end of the meeting. Initially the evenings of the Zielony Balonik cabaret were largely improvised: everybody could stand up and sing his or her favourite song or improvise a speech. The group of spectators was elitist, as only those who received invitations could attend the meetings. If someone showed dissatisfaction, he or she was not invited any more.

Elaborated by the editorial team of Małopolska's Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

See the puppets from the Zielony Balonik (Green Balloon) nativity play:
Puppets from the Zielony Balonik (Green Balloon) nativity play — Juliusz Leo
Puppets from the Zielony Balonik (Green Balloon) nativity play — Jacek Malczewski, by Jan Szczepkowski
Puppets from the Zielony Balonik (Green Balloon) nativity play — Jacek Malczewski, by Juliusz Puget

less

Szopka ludowa – szopka satyryczna

Wykorzystywanie formuły parateatralnej podczas celebracji danych świąt miało za zadanie urozmaicać przekaz, który z formy zwykłego odczytania tekstu Pisma Świętego, najczęściej podczas liturgii, przeszedł w odgrywanie przed oczami wiernego wydarzeń z życia Chrystusa. Jednak stopniowo jasełka zaczynały się laicyzować ‒ powiększono grono osób dramatu oraz wprowadzono wiele scenek o świeckim charakterze. Na kanwie treści religijnej zaczęły pojawiać się epizody zabawowe (komediowe).

more

Jasełka stanowiły udramatyzowaną formę szopki bożonarodzeniowej, która odgrywana była podczas obrzędu w formie dramatu liturgicznego. Wywodziły się z okazjonalnej dekoracji kościelnej, jaką była stajenka ze Świętą Rodziną. Szopka przyjmując z czasem konwencję widowiska została opatrzona dialogami oraz śpiewem. Rozbudowano ją o proscenium, na którego płaszczyźnie poruszały się laleczki składające pokłon Dzieciątku, animowane przez postacie schowane w jej podstawie. Wykorzystywanie formuły parateatralnej podczas celebracji danych świąt miało za zadanie urozmaicać przekaz, który z formy zwykłego odczytania tekstu Pisma Świętego, najczęściej podczas liturgii, przeszedł w odgrywanie przed oczami wiernego wydarzeń z życia Chrystusa. Jednak stopniowo jasełka zaczynały się laicyzować ‒ powiększono grono osób dramatu oraz wprowadzono wiele scenek o świeckim charakterze. Na kanwie treści religijnej zaczęły pojawiać się epizody zabawowe (komediowe), czy nawet, jak dzisiaj moglibyśmy to określić – gagi (przeczytaj Skąd wzięła się tradycja szopek bożonarodzeniowych?).
Ta zmiana formy przekazu, przybierająca charakter znacznie bardziej rozrywkowy, wpłynęła na wyodrębnienie się jasełek poza przestrzeń kościoła w XVIII wieku w związku z nakazem biskupim. Odgrywane odtąd we wsiach i miastach, przyjęły formę okazjonalnych, przenośnych teatrzyków, w rodzaju ludowego widowiska o charakterze również zarobkowym, wykonywanych przez służbę kościelną, nauczycieli i uczniów, a także mieszczan. Ludowa oraz rozrywkowa konwencja (prostota przekazu, rubaszny humor) wzmogły tendencję do uzupełniania tekstu dramatu aktualną tematyką (postacie, wydarzenia), w tym elementami  satyrycznymi (komentarze danej sytuacji np. społecznej). Główną atrakcją i efektem zeświecczenia szopek stały się właśnie scenki rodzajowe, które lokalnie różniły się specyfiką i ulubionymi przez publiczność postaciami.

Szopka ludowa, czy też kolędowa rozwijała się silnie w Warszawie, natomiast w tradycji krakowskiej zakorzeniła się w swojej lokalnej odmianie. Jej konwencjonalną formę ustaliła twórczość XIX wiecznego szopkarza krakowskiego Michała Ezenekiera, który wprowadził typowy dziś repertuar postaci, a także scenografię inspirowaną architekturą kościoła Mariackiego i zamku wawelskiego. Przez teksty szopki Ezenekiera silnie przezierały aktualności polityczne o charakterze patriotycznym, jak również czytelne trawestacje ówczesnej literatury.
Szopka ustanowiła zwyczajowy model, na którego płaszczyźnie można było przemycić wiele treści, zwłaszcza zaś dzięki elastyczności fabuły i postaci dawała dużo możliwości interpretacyjnych.
Zatem nic dziwnego, że już w połowie XIX wieku zaczęły pojawiać się pojedyncze dzieła literacko-publicystyczne stworzone w konwencji szopki. Teksty te bazowały na fabule udramatyzowanej szopki ludowej, wykorzystując jej stałe elementy (scenki, osoby), które służyły wewnątrzśrodowiskowej krytyce, bądź komentarzowi aktualności, przedstawione dodatkowo w formie satyry, często ukierunkowanej personalnie (osoby dramatu reprezentowały konkretne osoby żyjące). W 1849 roku wydana została słynna Szopka Teofila Lenartowicza (Wrocław, 1849), czy Rok 1849 w jasełkach Leszka Dunina-Borkowskiego („Tygodnik  Lwowski”, 1849), w 1880 opublikowano zaś teksty Szopka dla dorosłych dzieci i Szopka warszawska autorstwa Wiktora Gomulickiego.
Na gruncie krakowskim pojawiły się tzw. jasełka polityczne, które zaszczepili Józef Szujski (Jasełka galicyjskie, 1875) i Stanisław Tarnowski (Wędrówki po Galilei, 1873) oraz Lucjan Rydel w swoim słynnym dramacie Betlejem polskie (premiera teatralna ‒ 1904, publikacja ‒ 1906). Ciągle żywe i popularne widowisko w postaci szopki ludowej oraz zjawisko chłopomanii przełomu XIX i XX wieku stały się podwaliną dla miejscowej bohemy do przywrócenia tej tradycji w formie teatralno-literackej, lecz w odmianie satyrycznej. W 1906 roku w Jamie Michalika wystawiono pierwszą Szopkę krakowską kabaretu „Zielony Balonik”, która stała się fenomenalną i dotychczas najlepszą trawestacją szopki ludowej. Artyści oraz literaci wykorzystując schemat formalny szopki bożonarodzeniowej w kpiarskiej i prześmiewczej konwencji zaprezentowali ówczesne aktualności ze sceny krakowskiego życia artystycznego i społecznego, nie szczędząc komentarzy i personalnych dowcipów. Szopka zielonobalonikowa wystawiana była okazjonalnie, jej tematyka, mimo iż oscylująca wokół Bożego Narodzenia, zmieniała każdorazowo repertuar scenek i osób dramatu, reprezentujących różnych przedstawicieli tego środowiska (lalki o cechach portretowych). Szopka literacka kontynuowana były w międzywojniu przez Skamandrytów, w tym samym satyrycznym charakterze, wystawiana w ramach działalności kabaretu „Pod Pikadorem”, jej teksty publikowano zaś w „Cyruliku Warszawskim”.
Suma tych zjawisk, stanowiąca ewolucję gatunkową szopki (od dekoracji, przez dramat liturgiczny, teatrzyk ludowy, formę literacką, aż po kabaret) pozwala zrozumieć potencjał drzemiący w jej konwencji fabularnej. Rozbudowywana, zgodnie z lokalną specyfiką, o scenki rodzajowe, utożsamiła się z rodzimą problematyką – przez co utworzyła stałe tło i typologiczny repertuar postaci (jak w commedia dell’arte). Dało to możliwość aktualizacji, czyli eksplorowania i komentowania wydarzeń bieżących, przybierających niemal charakter „nigdy niestarzejącego się żartu”, dodatkowo prezentowanego w widowiskowej, żartobliwej odsłonie, wzmagającej jej atrakcyjność.
Oddźwięk tradycji typowo polskiej szopki satyrycznej usłyszeć można we współczesnym języku, czego konsekwencją jest nowe, potoczne rozumienie słowa „szopka”, jako: „sytuacji, zachowania itp. obliczonego na pokaz, ocenianego jako niepoważne”.

Zobacz również:
Szopki krakowskie autorstwa Macieja Moszewa, Romana Sochackiego, Mariana Dłużniewskiego, szopki laleczkowe z Wieliczki, z Chrzanowa (obecnie w Wygiełzowie);
Lalki z Szopki krakowskiej kabaretu „Zielony Balonik” przedstawiające Juliusza Leo i Jacka Malczewskiego.

Opracowanie: Paulina Kluz (Redakcja WMM),
Licencja Creative Commons

 Ten utwór jest dostępny na licencji Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa 3.0 Polska.

Bibliografia:
Słownik języka polskiego PWN [dostęp: 06.2015];
Grzegorz Sinko, "Betlejem polskie" po czterdziestu latach [dostęp: 06.2015];
Tomasz Weiss, Legenda i prawda Zielonego Balonika, Kraków 1976;
Ryszard Wierzbowski, O szopce: studia i szkice, Łódź 1990.

less

Puppets from the “Zielony Balonik” (“Green Balloon”) nativity play — Jacek Malczewski

Pictures

Audio

Lalka z szopki kabaretu „Zielony Balonik” przedstawiająca Jacka Malczewskiego, autorstwa Juliusza Pugeta [audiodeskrypcja] Tells: Fundacja na Rzecz Rozwoju Audiodeskrypcji KATARYNKA
play
Lalka z szopki kabaretu „Zielony Balonik” przedstawiająca Jacka Malczewskiego, autorstwa Juliusza Pugeta Tells: Piotr Krasny
play

Links

Game


Recent comments

Add comment: