List of all exhibits. Click on one of them to go to the exhibit page. The topics allow exhibits to be selected by their concept categories. On the right, you can choose the settings of the list view.

The list below shows links between exhibits in a non-standard way. The points denote the exhibits and the connecting lines are connections between them, according to the selected categories.

Enter the end dates in the windows in order to set the period you are interested in on the timeline.

Views: 3083
(Votes: 2)
The average rating is 5.0 stars out of 5.
Print metrics
Print description

The plaster sculpture representing Tadeusz Kościuszko is a fragment of the model of the monument erected in Washington in 1910. Spacious, small-size models of monumental sculptures were demonstrative objects for a commissioner or for competitions. They were made of plaster—brittle, non-durable material — and, therefore, many of them did not survive.

more

The plaster sculpture representing Tadeusz Kościuszko is a fragment of the model of the monument erected in Washington in 1910. Spacious, small-size models of monumental sculptures were demonstrative objects for a commissioner or for competitions. They were made of plaster—brittle, non-durable material — and, therefore, many of them did not survive. This makes the model of the Washington monument a highly valuable work of art, both in artistic as well as historical terms.
The full figure on the low, quadrilateral plinth shows Tadeusz Kościuszko standing straight and proud. The national hero was depicted in an American general’s uniform consisting of a short waistcoat, a double-breasted tail-coat with a high collar and general epaulettes on the shoulders; girded with a sash on the hips, tight trousers and high boots. His head is decorated with a bicorn, a military hat worn in the Napoleonic times by officers and generals in European and North American armies. In his right hand, resting on his leg, Kościuszko is holding a partially unrolled scroll. In his left hand is an unidentified object (Note — a request to the Museum for consultation: is it a sword hilt?). At his feet is a cannonball.
In 1903 in Chicago the Polish National Alliance, together with other Polish fraternal organisations operating in the United States at that time, passed a resolution to fund the monument commemorating Tadeusz Kościuszko. One year later, the Congress of the United States together with President Theodor Roosevelt agreed to erect the monument at the expense of “Polish-American organisations and the People of Poland in the United states.” At the end of 1905, the monument committee announced the competition for the design of the Tadeusz Kościuszko monument, which was addressed exclusively to Polish artists. Twenty models were sent, from among which the committee chose the work by the artist from Lviv—Antoni Popiel. A typical 19th-century monument consisted of the full figure representing the Polish national hero in an American uniform, with a map of American fortifications in Saratoga and a sword in his hand. It was placed on a tall, architectural plinth, surrounded with figural groups symbolising the Polish and American armed struggle for independence. The monument was erected in the years 1907–1909 in La Fayette Square in Washington. It was placed next to the monuments of three other foreigners who heroically participated in the war for the independence of the United States. The ceremonious unveiling of the Tadeusz Kościuszko Monument was held on 11 May 1910. A century later a faithful copy of the monument was placed in Plac Żelaznej Bramy [Iron-Gate Square] in Warsaw.
The creator of the monument was Antoni Sulima Popiel (1865–1910), a Polish sculptor, graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków and Vienna, disciple of Izydor Jabłoński, Władysław Łuszczkiewicz and Walery Gadomski. Having returned from his travels to Berlin and Florence, he finally settled in Lviv, where he took the position of the assistant to Professor Leonard Marconi in the department of drawing and modelling at the local polytechnic university. He went down in history of sculpture as the creator of numerous monumental works in Lviv. His works include the decoration of the vestibule in the Palace of Justice and the tympanum for the Grand Theatre and, primarily, the Adam Mickiewicz Monument. He has ties with Kraków by the work over the Tadeusz Kościuszko Monument, realised after the death of its designer, Leonard Marconi.
In the collection of the Historical Museum of the City of Kraków are numerous memorabilia connected with Tadeusz Kościuszko, including an epaulette from his American uniform from 1783.

Elaborated by Elżbieta Lang (Historical Museum of the City of Kraków), © all rights reserved

less

Artistic episode in Tadeusz Kościuszko’s life

Could Tadeusz Kościuszko, the famous leader of the Uprising in 1794, have been a painter?
In the National Museum in Kraków, there are nudes made with a red-brown chalk (so-called sanguine) and watercolour panoramas of Rome painted by Kościuszko.

more

 

T. Kościuszko, Ruins of ancient Rome, drawing made of
imagination during his studies in Paris in the period 1769—1774,
public domain

Could Tadeusz Kościuszko, the famous leader of the Uprising in 1794, have been a painter?
In the National Museum in Kraków, there are nudes made with a red-brown chalk (so-called sanguine) and watercolour panoramas of Rome painted by Kościuszko. The future general of the Polish and American armies painted them during his stay in France, which lasted for more than four years (the views of Rome were probably painted by him on the basis of works seen in Parisian museums). He went to France thanks to a royal scholarship, which he owed to the intercession of Prince Adam Czartoryski, his teacher in the famous Corps of Cadets (School of Knights); he attended the school in the years 1765–1769.
As a prominent student, he continued military education in France. He was trained in the field of military architecture, the usage of artillery and tactics. He broadened his knowledge of building fortifications and soon became famous in his field: during the American struggle for independence. He was always interested in military engineering, planning and deployment of defensive and artillery positions; that is why he attended lectures given by famous French engineers and architects. He also enrolled as a student at the Academy of Painting and Sculpture in Paris. Did he treat his studies at the Academy as a complement to his military education and preparation for sketching strategic battle plans, or did he discover a different calling than the military in the artistic atmosphere of Paris?

Elaborated by Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

See:
Model of Tadeusz Kościuszko Monument for Washington
Tadeusz Kościuszko’s sukmana coat

less

Model of Tadeusz Kościuszko Monument for Washington

Pictures

Links

Game


Recent comments

Add comment: