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Native bismuth is a mineral of the native element group, which very rarely occurs in nature, developing small rhombohedral or cuboid forms that resemble crystals. It usually develops grainy aggregates – compact, lamellate or dendritic.

 

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Native bismuth is a mineral of the native element group, which very rarely occurs in nature, developing small rhombohedral or cuboid forms that resemble crystals. It usually develops grainy aggregates – compact, lamellate or dendritic. It is created due to processes related to igneous and hydrothermal activity. Native bismuth most often occurs in ore veins, in deposits of tin, wolfram, cobalt, and uranium. It primarily occurs in Bolivia and the specimen in the museum collection comes from there.
This bismuth was part of the mineral collection which was donated by Ignacy Domeyko to the Academy of Learning during his visit to Kraków in 1884, which he mentioned in the 5th volume of Moje podróże, Pamiętniki wygnańca [My journeys, The Exile's Journal], published in Wrocław in the years 1962–1963.
The specimen is accompanied by a specification certificate written by Ignacy Domeyko in French, including additional notes concerning the mineral, e.g. the forms of its occurrence.

Elaborated by Barbara Kietlińska-Michalik (The Geological Museum of the Institute of Geological Sciences, Polish Academy of Sciences), editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums, © all rights reserved

Bibliography:
Jerzy Żaba, Ilustrowana Encyklopedia Skał i Minerałów, Katowice 2010.

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