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Set on a profiled base with bar holes is a picture painted on both sides of a board, presented in a simple frame, flanked with a wavy ribbon on the sides and topped with a decoratively cut peak with a cross. The structure of the procession float is painted with oil based cobalt paint.

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Set on a profiled base with bar holes is a picture painted on both sides of a board, presented in a simple frame, flanked with a wavy ribbon on the sides and topped with a decoratively cut peak with a cross. The structure of the procession float is painted with oil based cobalt paint. An image of the Mother of God presented frontally with her head turned 3/4. The Madonna is dressed in a dark-cobalt robe with a green neckline and vermilion coat. The dress is decorated with a row of pearls at shoulder height and around the cuffs . Three rows of beads hang around the neck. The head is covered with a white, short veil, from under which light brown hair flows. Her face has a a fair complexion, with features painted with a brown line. The head is surrounded by a yellow-olive aureole with a brown contour, and white straight and wavy rays. The Madonna's hands point to the vermilion heart on her chest, surrounded by pearls, against the background of a yellow-olive aureole with white rays. The background of the image is blue. Around the head of the Mother of God, five flowers (stars) were printed with cinnabar rhombuses and white dots. Jesus is viewed frontally with his head turned 3/4. Clothed in a vermilion robe with small yellow and white flowers, with a wide yellow-olive neckline, finished with white lace. His arms and back are covered with a dark-cobalt coat with white contours decorated with pearls, adorned with stylized flowers made from dots printed with a stamp. Jesus points to a burning, vermilion heart in the middle of the breast, surrounded by white dots, covered with a yellow-olive round aureole with white rays. His facial hair and hair falling on his shoulders are light brown. His face has a fair complexion, with features sketched with a thin brown line. The head and shoulders are surrounded by a yellow-olive nimbus with a vermilion contour, filled with zigzag rays. The whole is surrounded by white rays and round cinnabar roses with dark green leaves and branches made from white dots. The background of the image is blue. 

Elaborated by the Seweryn Udziela Ethnographic Museum in Kraków, © all rights reserved
 

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Feretron

Feretron (a procession float) derives from the Greek pheretron, meaning “litter” (in Latin feretrum — litter, bier, stretcher). It is an object akin to a stretcher, often with additional rods, formerly used in ancient Greece to carry the statues of deities.
Feretron is a term applied to a special type of paintings or sculptures depicting the images of saints, set on special platform, which were once used in processions during ecclesiastical ceremonies and also as a portable altar during pilgrimages.

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Feretron (a procession float) derives from the Greek pheretron, meaning “litter” (in Latin feretrum — litter, bier, stretcher). It is an object akin to a stretcher, often with additional rods, formerly used in ancient Greece to carry the statues of deities.
Feretron is a term applied to a special type of paintings or sculptures depicting the images of saints, set on special platform, which were once used in processions during ecclesiastical ceremonies and also as a portable altar during pilgrimages.
In contrast to Western Europe, in Poland, feretrons were mostly paintings and reliefs placed on a special platform, into which wooden rods were inserted for the purpose of carrying them.
During the Middle Ages, feretrons, similar to flags and banners, were owned by brotherhoods and craftsmen’s guilds. Nowadays, feretrons are mostly owned by church associations and clubs which operate in parishes.

Elaborated by Museum – Vistula Ethnographic Park in Wygiełzów and Lipowiec Castle, © all rights reserved

See feretrons from the Małopolska’s Virtual Museums collection:
Procession float, obverse: “Heart of Our Lady”, reverse: “Heart of Jesus”
Wooden feretrum
Feretory depicting St. Anne and Christ crowned

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Procession float, obverse: “Heart of Our Lady”, reverse: “Heart of Jesus”

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