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A white cassock with small buttons (just like red shoes) is an everyday Pope’s outfit. White symbolises the purity of body and soul. The history of the papal outfit of that colour dates back to the time of Pope Pius V — a Dominican who, during his pontificate (1566–1577), introduced decisions of the Council of Trent connected, among others, with the renewal of the hierarchy in the Church.

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A white cassock with small buttons (just like red shoes) is an everyday Pope’s outfit. White symbolises the purity of body and soul. The history of the papal outfit of that colour dates back to the time of Pope Pius V — a Dominican who, during his pontificate (1566–1577), introduced decisions of the Council of Trent connected, among others, with the renewal of the hierarchy in the Church.
The cassock, which belonged to John Paul II, is special due to the fact that one of its inner pockets has an embroidered note, “6–10 June 1979, Kraków” — a date which coincides with his first pilgrimage to Poland (2–10 June 1979).
Even the announcement of the visit, arranged on the anniversary of St. Stanislaus’s martyr death, caused anxiety among the communist government which unsuccessfully tried to ban the visit. During the homily in the Victory Square in Warsaw (former Piłsudski Square), historic words were spoken: “Let your spirit descend! Let your spirit descend! And renew the face of the earth. The face of this land!”
Among eight cities, Kraków was placed on the route of the pilgrimage (6 and 8–10 June) twice, along with Warsaw, Gniezno, Wadowice, Częstochowa, Oświęcim, Nowy Targ and Kalwaria Zebrzydowska. It was in Kraków that John Paul II met the youth, initiating the tradition of meetings under the window on 3 Franciszkańska Street, which was later cultivated.
“When he appeared at the window for the first time in 1979 (…) he bantered with the clamorous youth: ‘It is hard to be the pope in Rome but it would be even harder to be one in Kraków, standing at the window with no time to sleep and think’”[1].
Under pressure put by the then authorities during the first visit, he did not manage to visit Nowa Huta. It was not possible until 1983, during his second pilgrimage.

Elaborated by the editorial team of Małopolska's Virtual Museums,
Licencja Creative Commons

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

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The Pope’s different faces

Andrzej Jawień, A.J., Stanisław Andrzej Gruda, Piotr Jasień – what do these names have to do with Karol Wojtyła? Karol was a young priest, but also a poet and a playwright. He wrote often, but kept his writings in a drawer and published them rarely under the selected pseudonyms.

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Andrzej Jawień, A.J., Stanisław Andrzej Gruda, Piotr Jasień – what do these names have to do with Karol Wojtyła? Karol was a young priest, but also a poet and a playwright. He wrote often, but kept his writings in a drawer and published them rarely under the selected pseudonyms.
Marek Skwarnicki wrote initially in the preface to Poezje, dramaty i szkice [Poems, Dramas and Literary Sketches] (Kraków 2004) that the novel Niebo w płomieniach [Sky on Fire], written by Jan Parandowski, with Jawień as the main character, was the source of his first assumed name.
Later it was discovered that Jawień was the family name of one of the parishioners of Niegowić, where Karol Wojtyła performed pastoral ministry as a vicar after his ordination.
Stanisław Andrzej Gruda appeared in Karol Wojtyła’s cardinal period when he handed over a manuscript of Promienowanie ojcostwa [The Radiation of Fatherhood] to the Znak Publishing House.

After he was elected pope, his writings appeared in print and were translated into numerous languages; however, he himself remained silent as a poet for the next twenty four years. In 2003 he finally published Tryptyk rzymski [Roman Triptych, Meditations].

Elaborated by Anna Berestecka (Editorial team of Małopolska’s Virtual Museums),
Licencja Creative Commons

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Poland License.

See also:
Diary with notes by Karol Wojtyła

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Cassock and zucchetto of Pope John Paul II

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