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The flying suit was made of brown wadded satin, closed on the front with a metal zip. Legs from the waist to the lower edges and on the sides are closed with metal zips. Additionally, the suit has an internal pocket...

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The flying suit was made of brown wadded satin, closed on the front with a metal zip. Legs from the waist to the lower edges and on the sides are closed with metal zips. Additionally, the suit has an internal pocket set in on the left-hand side around the crotch, vertically closed with a flap. The left sleeve features a British badge for RAF's non-commissioned officers.
The suit belonged to a pilot from the 34th SAAF Division, Sgt Ronald Pithr, who was flying with an airdrop for the Home Army (Cekinia 202—Końskie outpost) with the aircraft Liberator EW250 of the 34th Division of the South-African Air Forces. The airplane was shot down on the night of 16 October 1944. The victims were Lt Cullingwort, pilot; Lt Franklin, pilot; McLeod, navigator; Lt Ray-Howett,  wireless operator; Sgt Speed, bomb-aimer; Sgt Richmong, rifleman; Sgt Bowden, rifleman. Sgt Pithr was the only person of the 8-man crew to survive; he did a parachute jump around Kocina—Czarkowy village located at the bifurcation of the Vistula and Nida Rivers. The remaining crew members were buried at the Rakowicki cemetery in Kraków. Ronald Pithr was saved by the Home Army and hid until the German occupation came to an end.
Note the hole around the right breast — a trace of the soldier being wounded by the shrapnel of a bullet from a Luftwaffe night fighter plane, the shrapnel is also a part of the Home Army Museum's collection. Night fighters were a curse for airdrop crews flying in the night to Poland. Poland's southern territories, crossed by flying routes running beside positions of anti-aircraft artillery, were packed with night fighters hunting for Allied planes flying to aid the Home Army.

Elaborated by the Museum of the Home Army dedicated Gen. Emil Fieldorf “Nil”, © all rights reserved

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